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1.
J Immunol ; 208(6): 1467-1482, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690085

ABSTRACT

Asthma is a chronic disease of childhood, but for unknown reasons, disease activity sometimes subsides as children mature. In this study, we present clinical and animal model evidence suggesting that the age dependency of childhood asthma stems from an evolving host response to respiratory viral infection. Using clinical data, we show that societal suppression of respiratory virus transmission during coronavirus disease 2019 lockdown disrupted the traditional age gradient in pediatric asthma exacerbations, connecting the phenomenon of asthma remission to virus exposure. In mice, we show that asthmatic lung pathology triggered by Sendai virus (SeV) or influenza A virus is highly age-sensitive: robust in juvenile mice (4-6 wk old) but attenuated in mature mice (>3 mo old). Interestingly, allergen induction of the same asthmatic traits was less dependent on chronological age than viruses. Age-specific responses to SeV included a juvenile bias toward type 2 airway inflammation that emerged early in infection, whereas mature mice exhibited a more restricted bronchiolar distribution of infection that produced a distinct type 2 low inflammatory cytokine profile. In the basal state, aging produced changes to lung leukocyte burden, including the number and transcriptional landscape of alveolar macrophages (AMs). Importantly, depleting AMs in mature mice restored post-SeV pathology to juvenile levels. Thus, aging influences chronic outcomes of respiratory viral infection through regulation of the AM compartment and type 2 inflammatory responses to viruses. Our data provide insight into how asthma remission might develop in children.


Subject(s)
Age Factors , Aging/physiology , Asthma/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Influenza A virus/physiology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Lung/immunology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology , Respirovirus Infections/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sendai virus/physiology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Animals , Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , United States/epidemiology
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 797390, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686476

ABSTRACT

Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are immunomodulatory drugs approved to treat diseases associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as COPD, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Tanimilast (international non-proprietary name of CHF6001) is a novel, potent and selective inhaled PDE4 inhibitor in advanced clinical development for the treatment of COPD. To begin testing its potential in limiting hyperinflammation and immune dysregulation associated to SARS-CoV-2 infection, we took advantage of an in vitro model of dendritic cell (DC) activation by SARS-CoV-2 genomic ssRNA (SCV2-RNA). In this context, Tanimilast decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6), chemokines (CCL3, CXCL9, and CXCL10) and of Th1-polarizing cytokines (IL-12, type I IFNs). In contrast to ß-methasone, a reference steroid anti-inflammatory drug, Tanimilast did not impair the acquisition of the maturation markers CD83, CD86 and MHC-II, nor that of the lymph node homing receptor CCR7. Consistent with this, Tanimilast did not reduce the capability of SCV2-RNA-stimulated DCs to activate CD4+ T cells but skewed their polarization towards a Th2 phenotype. Both Tanimilast and ß-methasone blocked the increase of MHC-I molecules in SCV2-RNA-activated DCs and restrained the proliferation and activation of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Our results indicate that Tanimilast can modulate the SCV2-RNA-induced pro-inflammatory and Th1-polarizing potential of DCs, crucial regulators of both the inflammatory and immune response. Given also the remarkable safety demonstrated by Tanimilast, up to now, in clinical studies, we propose this inhaled PDE4 inhibitor as a promising immunomodulatory drug in the scenario of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells , Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitors/pharmacology , RNA/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Activation/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokines/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Humans , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Virus Activation/immunology
3.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 149(2): 455-465, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676782

ABSTRACT

Severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease encompassing different phenotypes and endotypes. Although patients with severe asthma constitute a small proportion of the total population with asthma, they largely account for the morbidity and mortality associated with asthma, indicating a clear unmet need. Being distinct from mild and moderate disease, new insights into the immunopathogenesis of severe asthma are needed. The disease endotypes have provided better insights into the immunopathogenic mechanisms underlying severe asthma. Current stratified approach of treating severe asthma based on phenotypes is met with shortcomings, necessitating unbiased multidimensional endotyping to cope with disease complexity. Therefore, in this review, we explore the distinct endotypes and their mechanistic pathways that characterize the heterogeneity observed in severe asthma.


Subject(s)
Asthma/immunology , Airway Remodeling , Asthma/etiology , Asthma/therapy , Autophagy/physiology , Bronchial Thermoplasty , Humans , Mitochondria/physiology , Obesity/complications , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 761382, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638133

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to several pioneering scientific discoveries resulting in no effective solutions with the exception of vaccination. Moderate exercise is a significant non-pharmacological strategy, to reduce the infection-related burden of COVID-19, especially in patients who are obese, elderly, and with additional comorbidities. The imbalance of T helper type 1 (Th1) or T helper type 2 (Th2) cells has been well documented among populations who have suffered as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and who are at maximum risk of infection and mortality. Moderate and low intensity exercise can benefit persons at risk from the disease and survivors by favorable modulation in Th1/Th2 ratios. Moreover, in COVID-19 patients, mild to moderate intensity aerobic exercise also increases immune system function but high intensity aerobic exercise may have adverse effects on immune responses. In addition, sustained hypoxia in COVID-19 patients has been reported to cause organ failure and cell death. Hypoxic conditions have also been highlighted to be triggered in COVID-19-susceptible individuals and COVID-19 survivors. This suggests that hypoxia inducible factor (HIF 1α) might be an important focus for researchers investigating effective strategies to minimize the effects of the pandemic. Intermittent hypoxic preconditioning (IHP) is a method of exposing subjects to short bouts of moderate hypoxia interspersed with brief periods of normal oxygen concentrations (recovery). This methodology inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory factors, activates HIF-1α to activate target genes, and subsequently leads to a higher production of red blood cells and hemoglobin. This increases angiogenesis and increases oxygen transport capacity. These factors can help alleviate virus induced cardiopulmonary hemodynamic disorders and endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, during the COVID-19 pandemic we propose that populations should engage in low to moderate exercise individually designed, prescribed and specific, that utilizes IHP including pranayama (yoga), swimming and high-altitude hiking exercise. This would be beneficial in affecting HIF-1α to combat the disease and its severity. Therefore, the promotion of certain exercises should be considered by all sections of the population. However, exercise recommendations and prescription for COVID-19 patients should be structured to match individual levels of capability and adaptability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Aging , COVID-19/pathology , Comorbidity , Humans , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Immunomodulation/immunology , Pandemics , Th1-Th2 Balance
6.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 624483, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574395

ABSTRACT

The immune response type organized against viral infection is determinant in the prognosis of some infections. This work has aimed to study Th polarization in acute COVID-19 and its possible association with the outcome through an observational prospective study. Fifty-eight COVID-19 patients were recruited in the Medicine Department of the hospital "12 de Octubre," 55 patients remaining after losses to follow-up. Four groups were established according to maximum degree of disease progression. T-helper cell percentages and phenotypes, analyzed by flow cytometer, and serum cytokines levels, analyzed by Luminex, were evaluated when the microbiological diagnosis (acute phase) of the disease was obtained. Our study found a significant reduction of %Th1 and %Th17 cells with higher activated %Th2 cells in the COVID-19 patients compared with reference population. A higher percent of senescent Th2 cells was found in the patients who died than in those who survived. Senescent Th2 cell percentage was an independent risk factor for death (OR: 13.88) accompanied by the numbers of total lymphocytes (OR: 0.15) with an AUC of 0.879. COVID-19 patients showed a profile of pro-inflammatory serum cytokines compared to controls, with higher levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-15, and IP-10. IL-10 and IL-13 were also elevated in patients compared to controls. Patients who did not survive presented significantly higher levels of IL-15 than those who recovered. No significant differences were observed according to disease progression groups. The study has shown that increased levels of IL-15 and a high Th2 response are associated with a fatal outcome of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Immunity , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Prospective Studies , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology
7.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 102: 108383, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521087

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: To date, the effects of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines on people living with HIV (PLWH) were mainly focused on messenger RNA (mRNA) and adenovirus vector-based vaccines, and little is known about the effects of inactivated virus-based vaccine. This study was designed to determine the effects of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines on PLWH. METHODS: Twenty-four HIV-positive individuals and 24 healthy donors (HD) were respectively recruited from Malipo Country People's Hospital and community in Kunming city. Enumeration of lymphocyte and CD4+CD45RO+ memory T cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. Competitive ELISA was used to measure the level of Anti-SARS-CoV-2 neutralization antibody. Spearman or Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyze the relationship between laboratory indicators and neutralization antibodies in PLWH. T-cell responses (Th1, Th2, Th17, Treg) and intracellular expression of cytokines (IL-2 and TNF-α) in CD4 or CD8 were induced by spike protein in SARS-CoV-2 (SARS-2-S) and further measured by intracellular staining. RESULTS: CD4, B cells, CD4+CD45RO+ memory T cells in peripheral blood of PLWH are dramatically decreased in comparison with HD. Importantly, PLWH display comparable neutralizing antibody positive rate to HD after inoculation with inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. However, PLWH showed weaker responses to vaccines exhibited by lower levels of neutralizing antibodies. Correlation analysis shows that this is possibly caused by low number of CD4 and B cells. Furthermore, SARS-2-S-induced Th2 and Th17 responses are also decreased in PLWH, while no influences on Treg and other cytokines (IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ) observed. CONCLUSIONS: PLWH and HD have comparable neutralizing antibodies positive rates, but PLWH display weaker responses to inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in magnitude, which suggests that a booster dose or dose adjustment are required for HIV-infected individuals, especially for those with lower counts of CD4 T and B cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , HIV Infections/blood , HIV Infections/complications , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 757691, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463478

ABSTRACT

The increase in confirmed COVID-19 cases and SARS-CoV-2 variants calls for the development of safe and broad cross-protective vaccines. The RBD of the spike protein was considered to be a safe and effective candidate antigen. However, the low immunogenicity limited its application in vaccine development. Herein, we designed and obtained an RBD heptamer (mHla-RBD) based on a carrier protein-aided assembly strategy. The molecular weight of mHla-RBD is up to 450 kDa, approximately 10 times higher than that of the RBD monomer. When formulated with alum adjuvant, mHla-RBD immunization significantly increased the immunogenicity of RBD, as indicated by increased titers of RBD-specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, Th2 cellular immune response, and pseudovirus neutralization activity, when compared to RBD monomer. Furthermore, we confirmed that RBD-specific antibodies predominantly target conformational epitopes, which was approximately 200 times that targeting linear epitopes. Finally, a pseudovirus neutralization assay revealed that neutralizing antibodies induced by mHla-RBD against different SARS-CoV-2 variants were comparable to those against the wild-type virus and showed broad-spectrum neutralizing activity toward different SARS-CoV-2 variants. Our results demonstrated that mHla-RBD is a promising candidate antigen for development of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines and the mHla could serve as a universal carrier protein for antigen design.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Hemolysin Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Th2 Cells/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/metabolism , Cell Line , Escherichia coli Proteins , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Protein Domains/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
9.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(12): 3194-3201, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437042

ABSTRACT

Accelerate lung repair in SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia is essential for pandemic handling. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are likely players, given their role in mucosal protection and tissue homeostasis. We studied ILC subpopulations at two time points in a cohort of patients admitted in the hospital due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. COVID-19 patients with moderate/severe respiratory failure featured profound depletion of circulating ILCs at hospital admission, in agreement with overall lymphocyte depletion. However, ILCs recovered in direct correlation with lung function improvement as measured by oxygenation index and in negative association with inflammatory and lung/endothelial damage markers like RAGE. While both ILC1 and ILC2 expanded, ILC2 showed the most striking phenotype changes, with CCR10 upregulation in strong correlation with these parameters. Overall, CCR10+ ILC2 emerge as relevant contributors to SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia recovery.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptors, CCR10/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , Antigens, Neoplasm/metabolism , Cell Proliferation , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Male , Middle Aged , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Recovery of Function , Th2 Cells/immunology , Up-Regulation
10.
Cell Rep ; 37(1): 109798, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415262

ABSTRACT

Despite the worldwide effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the underlying mechanisms of fatal viral pneumonia remain elusive. Here, we show that critical COVID-19 is associated with enhanced eosinophil-mediated inflammation when compared to non-critical cases. In addition, we confirm increased T helper (Th)2-biased adaptive immune responses, accompanying overt complement activation, in the critical group. Moreover, enhanced antibody responses and complement activation are associated with disease pathogenesis as evidenced by formation of immune complexes and membrane attack complexes in airways and vasculature of lung biopsies from six fatal cases, as well as by enhanced hallmark gene set signatures of Fcγ receptor (FcγR) signaling and complement activation in myeloid cells of respiratory specimens from critical COVID-19 patients. These results suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection may drive specific innate immune responses, including eosinophil-mediated inflammation, and subsequent pulmonary pathogenesis via enhanced Th2-biased immune responses, which might be crucial drivers of critical disease in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Eosinophils/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antigen-Antibody Complex/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Complement Activation , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/metabolism , Eosinophils/virology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/virology , Lung Injury/immunology , Lung Injury/pathology , Lung Injury/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Receptors, IgG/immunology , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction , Th2 Cells/immunology , Viral Load , Young Adult
11.
J Med Virol ; 94(1): 404-406, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377591

ABSTRACT

The presence of a complex immune dysregulation syndrome has been established in COVID-19 patients. We aimed to assess Th1/Th2 response in COVID-19 patients and its association with disease severity by performing a prospective cohort study in a tertiary hospital COVID-19 referral center. We report no difference between Th1/Th2 responses between patients with severe and mild disease, except for levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10. Future larger studies should examine lung-specific versus systemic inflammatory responses, as well as, diverse immunotypes driving poor clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-6/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Female , Greece , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
12.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 282: 114574, 2022 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373117

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Gekko gecko is used as a traditional medicine for various diseases including respiratory disorders in northeast Asian countries, mainly Korea, Japan, and China. AIM OF THE STUDY: Allergic asthma is a chronic respiratory disease caused by an inappropriate immune response. Due to the recent spread of coronavirus disease 2019, interest in the treatment of pulmonary disorders has rapidly increased. In this study, we investigated the anti-asthmatic effects of G. gecko extract (GGE) using an established mouse model of ovalbumin-induced asthma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To evaluate the anti-asthmatic effects of GGE, we evaluated histological changes and the responses of inflammatory mediators related to allergic airway inflammation. Furthermore, we investigated the regulatory effects of GGE on type 2 helper T (Th2) cell activation. RESULTS: Administration of GGE attenuated asthmatic phenotypes, including inflammatory cell infiltration, mucus production, and expression of Th2 cytokines. Furthermore, GGE treatment reduced Th2 cell activation and differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that GGE alleviates allergic airway inflammation by regulating Th2 cell activation and differentiation.


Subject(s)
Anti-Asthmatic Agents/therapeutic use , Asthma/drug therapy , Medicine, East Asian Traditional , Mucus/metabolism , Ovalbumin , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Animals , Asthma/chemically induced , Asthma/pathology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19 , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Flow Cytometry , Immunoglobulin E/immunology , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Pandemics , Th2 Cells/drug effects , Th2 Cells/immunology , Tryptamines/pharmacology
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346498

ABSTRACT

Eosinophils are granulocytes primarily associated with TH2 responses to parasites or immune hyper-reactive states, such as asthma, allergies, or eosinophilic esophagitis. However, it does not make sense from an evolutionary standpoint to maintain a cell type that is only specific for parasitic infections and that otherwise is somehow harmful to the host. In recent years, there has been a shift in the perception of these cells. Eosinophils have recently been recognized as regulators of immune homeostasis and suppressors of over-reactive pro-inflammatory responses by secreting specific molecules that dampen the immune response. Their role during parasitic infections has been well investigated, and their versatility during immune responses to helminths includes antigen presentation as well as modulation of T cell responses. Although it is known that eosinophils can present antigens during viral infections, there are still many mechanistic aspects of the involvement of eosinophils during viral infections that remain to be elucidated. However, are eosinophils able to respond to bacterial infections? Recent literature indicates that Helicobacter pylori triggers TH2 responses mediated by eosinophils; this promotes anti-inflammatory responses that might be involved in the long-term persistent infection caused by this pathogen. Apparently and on the contrary, in the respiratory tract, eosinophils promote TH17 pro-inflammatory responses during Bordetella bronchiseptica infection, and they are, in fact, critical for early clearance of bacteria from the respiratory tract. However, eosinophils are also intertwined with microbiota, and up to now, it is not clear if microbiota regulates eosinophils or vice versa, or how this connection influences immune responses. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge of eosinophils as regulators of pro and anti-inflammatory responses in the context of both infection and naïve conditions. We propose questions and future directions that might open novel research avenues in the future.


Subject(s)
Bordetella Infections/immunology , Bordetella bronchiseptica/immunology , Eosinophils/immunology , Helicobacter Infections/immunology , Helicobacter pylori/immunology , Microbiota/immunology , Animals , Humans , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology
14.
J Immunol ; 207(4): 1099-1111, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328168

ABSTRACT

Understanding the function of SARS-CoV-2 Ag-specific T cells is crucial for the monitoring of antiviral immunity and vaccine design. Currently, both impaired and robust T cell immunity is described in COVID-19 patients. In this study, we explored and compared the effector functions of SARS-CoV-2-reactive T cells expressing coinhibitory receptors and examine the immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 S, M, and N peptide pools in regard to specific effector T cell responses, Th1/Th2/Th17, in COVID-19 patients. Analyzing a cohort of 108 COVID-19 patients with mild, moderate, and severe disease, we observed that coinhibitory receptors (e.g., PD-1, CTLA-4, TIM-3, VISTA, CD39, CD160, 2B4, TIGIT, Gal-9, and NKG2A) were upregulated on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Importantly, the expression of coinhibitory receptors on T cells recognizing SARS-CoV-2 peptide pools (M/N/S) was associated with increased frequencies of cytokine-producing T cells. Thus, our data refute the concept of pathological T cell exhaustion in COVID-19 patients. Despite interindividual variations in the T cell response to viral peptide pools, a Th2 phenotype was associated with asymptomatic and milder disease, whereas a robust Th17 was associated with severe disease, which may potentiate the hyperinflammatory response in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. Our data demonstrate that T cells may either play a protective or detrimental role in COVID-19 patients. This finding could have important implications for immune correlates of protection, diagnostic, and prophylaxis with respect to COVID-19 management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Viral Matrix Proteins/immunology
15.
J Immunol ; 206(7): 1409-1417, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314814

ABSTRACT

Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are a set of effectors that mediate the expulsion of helminthic parasites but also drive allergic lung inflammation. As innate agents, they do not recognize Ag, instead, they are sensitive to alarmin engagement, upon which they produce type 2 cytokines that amplify adaptive immunity. Their lymphoid identity appoints them as an intriguing group of unconventional cells; however, increasing evidence is unraveling a series of unprecedented functions that <5 years ago were unthinkable for ILC2s, such as acquiring a proinflammatory identity that enables them to support TH1 immune responses. Their plastic nature has allowed the characterization of ILC2s in more detail than ever; however, the novelty of ILC2 biology requires constant updates and recapitulations. This review provides an overview of ILC2s and describes memory ILC2, regulatory ILC2, inflammatory ILC2, and type 1 ILC2 subsets based on activation status, tissue environments, and function.


Subject(s)
Lymphocytes/immunology , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Animals , Cellular Microenvironment , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Immunologic Memory , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism
16.
Front Immunol ; 12: 691725, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305646

ABSTRACT

After more than one year since the COVID-19 outbreak, patients with severe disease still constitute the bottleneck of the pandemic management. Aberrant inflammatory responses, ranging from cytokine storm to immune-suppression, were described in COVID-19 and no treatment was demonstrated to change the prognosis significantly. Therefore, there is an urgent need for understanding the underlying pathogenic mechanisms to guide therapeutic interventions. This study was designed to assess myeloid cell activation and phenotype leading to recovery in patients surviving severe COVID-19. We evaluated longitudinally patients with COVID-19 related respiratory insufficiency, stratified according to the need of intensive care unit admission (ICU, n = 11, and No-ICU, n = 9), and age and sex matched healthy controls (HCs, n = 11), by flow cytometry and a wide array of serum inflammatory/immune-regulatory mediators. All patients featured systemic immune-regulatory myeloid cell phenotype as assessed by both unsupervised and supervised analysis of circulating monocyte and dendritic cell subsets. Specifically, we observed a reduction of CD14lowCD16+ monocytes, and reduced expression of CD80, CD86, and Slan. Moreover, mDCs, pDCs, and basophils were significantly reduced, in comparison to healthy subjects. Contemporaneously, both monocytes and DCs showed increased expression of CD163, CD204, CD206, and PD-L1 immune-regulatory markers. The expansion of M2-like monocytes was significantly higher at admission in patients featuring detectable SARS-CoV-2 plasma viral load and it was positively correlated with the levels of specific antibodies. In No-ICU patients, we observed a peak of the alterations at admission and a progressive regression to a phenotype similar to HCs at discharge. Interestingly, in ICU patients, the expression of immuno-suppressive markers progressively increased until discharge. Notably, an increase of M2-like HLA-DRhighPD-L1+ cells in CD14++CD16- monocytes and in dendritic cell subsets was observed at ICU discharge. Furthermore, IFN-γ and IL-12p40 showed a decline over time in ICU patients, while high values of IL1RA and IL-10 were maintained. In conclusion, these results support that timely acquisition of a myeloid cell immune-regulatory phenotype might contribute to recovery in severe systemic SARS-CoV-2 infection and suggest that therapeutic agents favoring an innate immune system regulatory shift may represent the best strategy to be implemented at this stage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Monocytes/immunology , Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , Cell Differentiation , Critical Care , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Respiratory Insufficiency , Severity of Illness Index , Th2 Cells/immunology
17.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(7): 950-961, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: BBV152 is a whole-virion inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (3 µg or 6 µg) formulated with a toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist molecule (IMDG) adsorbed to alum (Algel). We previously reported findings from a double-blind, multicentre, randomised, controlled phase 1 trial on the safety and immunogenicity of three different formulations of BBV152 (3 µg with Algel-IMDG, 6 µg with Algel-IMDG, or 6 µg with Algel) and one Algel-only control (no antigen), with the first dose administered on day 0 and the second dose on day 14. The 3 µg and 6 µg with Algel-IMDG formulations were selected for this phase 2 study. Herein, we report interim findings of the phase 2 trial on the immunogenicity and safety of BBV152, with the first dose administered on day 0 and the second dose on day 28. METHODS: We did a double-blind, randomised, multicentre, phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of BBV152 in healthy adults and adolescents (aged 12-65 years) at nine hospitals in India. Participants with positive SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid and serology tests were excluded. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either 3 µg with Algel-IMDG or 6 µg with Algel-IMDG. Block randomisation was done by use of an interactive web response system. Participants, investigators, study coordinators, study-related personnel, and the sponsor were masked to treatment group allocation. Two intramuscular doses of vaccine were administered on day 0 and day 28. The primary outcome was SARS-CoV-2 wild-type neutralising antibody titres and seroconversion rates (defined as a post-vaccination titre that was at least four-fold higher than the baseline titre) at 4 weeks after the second dose (day 56), measured by use of the plaque-reduction neutralisation test (PRNT50) and the microneutralisation test (MNT50). The primary outcome was assessed in all participants who had received both doses of the vaccine. Cell-mediated responses were a secondary outcome and were assessed by T-helper-1 (Th1)/Th2 profiling at 2 weeks after the second dose (day 42). Safety was assessed in all participants who received at least one dose of the vaccine. In addition, we report immunogenicity results from a follow-up blood draw collected from phase 1 trial participants at 3 months after they received the second dose (day 104). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04471519. FINDINGS: Between Sept 5 and 12, 2020, 921 participants were screened, of whom 380 were enrolled and randomly assigned to the 3 µg with Algel-IMDG group (n=190) or 6 µg with Algel-IMDG group (n=190). Geometric mean titres (GMTs; PRNT50) at day 56 were significantly higher in the 6 µg with Algel-IMDG group (197·0 [95% CI 155·6-249·4]) than the 3 µg with Algel-IMDG group (100·9 [74·1-137·4]; p=0·0041). Seroconversion based on PRNT50 at day 56 was reported in 171 (92·9% [95% CI 88·2-96·2] of 184 participants in the 3 µg with Algel-IMDG group and 174 (98·3% [95·1-99·6]) of 177 participants in the 6 µg with Algel-IMDG group. GMTs (MNT50) at day 56 were 92·5 (95% CI 77·7-110·2) in the 3 µg with Algel-IMDG group and 160·1 (135·8-188·8) in the 6 µg with Algel-IMDG group. Seroconversion based on MNT50 at day 56 was reported in 162 (88·0% [95% CI 82·4-92·3]) of 184 participants in the 3 µg with Algel-IMDG group and 171 (96·6% [92·8-98·8]) of 177 participants in the 6 µg with Algel-IMDG group. The 3 µg with Algel-IMDG and 6 µg with Algel-IMDG formulations elicited T-cell responses that were biased to a Th1 phenotype at day 42. No significant difference in the proportion of participants who had a solicited local or systemic adverse reaction in the 3 µg with Algel-IMDG group (38 [20·0%; 95% CI 14·7-26·5] of 190) and the 6 µg with Algel-IMDG group (40 [21·1%; 15·5-27·5] of 190) was observed on days 0-7 and days 28-35; no serious adverse events were reported in the study. From the phase 1 trial, 3-month post-second-dose GMTs (MNT50) were 39·9 (95% CI 32·0-49·9) in the 3µg with Algel-IMDG group, 69·5 (53·7-89·9) in the 6 µg with Algel-IMDG group, 53·3 (40·1-71·0) in the 6 µg with Algel group, and 20·7 (14·5-29·5) in the Algel alone group. INTERPRETATION: In the phase 1 trial, BBV152 induced high neutralising antibody responses that remained elevated in all participants at 3 months after the second vaccination. In the phase 2 trial, BBV152 showed better reactogenicity and safety outcomes, and enhanced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses compared with the phase 1 trial. The 6 µg with Algel-IMDG formulation has been selected for the phase 3 efficacy trial. FUNDING: Bharat Biotech International. TRANSLATION: For the Hindi translation of the abstract see Supplementary Materials section.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Child , Double-Blind Method , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/immunology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/immunology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Young Adult
18.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 97: 107828, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253058

ABSTRACT

In various pathological conditions, cellular immunity plays an important role in immune responses. Amongimmunecells, T lymphocytes pdomotecellular and humoralresponses as well as innate immunity. Therefore, careful investigation of these cells has a significant impact on accurate knowledge in COVID-19diseasepathogenesis. In current research, the frequency and function of various T lymphocytes involved in immune responses examined in SARS-CoV-2 patients with various disease severity compared to normal subjects. In order to make an accurate comparison among patients with various disease severity, this study was performed on asymptomatic recovered cases (n = 20), ICU hospitalized patients (n = 30), non-ICU hospitalized patients (n = 30), and normal subjects (n = 20). To precisely evaluate T cells activity following purification, their cytokine secretion activity was examined. Similarly, immediately after purification of Treg cells, their inhibitory activity on T cells was investigated. The results showed that COVID-19 patients with severe disease (ICU hospitalized patients) not only had a remarkable increase in Th1 and Th17 but also a considerable decrease in Th2 and Treg cells. More importantly, as the IL-17 and IFN-γ secretion was sharply increased in severe disease, the secretion of IL-10 and IL-4 was decreased. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of Treg cells was reduced in severe disease patients in comparison to other groups. In severe COVID-19 disease, current findings indicate when the inflammatory arm of cellular immunity is significantly increased, a considerable reduction in anti-inflammatory and regulatory arm occurred.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/virology , Adult , Aged , Cytokines/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Inflammation/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Interleukin-4/metabolism , Leukocytes/immunology , Leukocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/metabolism , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Th17 Cells/immunology , Th17 Cells/metabolism , Th2 Cells/immunology , Th2 Cells/metabolism , Young Adult
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