Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(8)2022 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1785689

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, physical inactivity and being overweight increased in children, especially those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Additionally, a decrease in motor performance has been increasingly reported; however, there is a lack of meaningful data on the relationship between these findings and socioeconomic status. Therefore, we examined the BMI, BMI z score, the prevalence of overweight/obesity, and motor performance (based on lateral jumping, the standing long jump, and the 6-min run) among three cohorts from timelines before (2016) and during the pandemic (2020, 2021), using a cohort sequential design. Our analysis revealed that all parameters examined showed a significant negative trend over time. For children with a low social burden, the trend was statistically detectable only for lateral jumping and the 6-min run. For children with a high social burden, the prevalence of overweight/obesity increased from 4.2% to 5.4% between 2016 and 2021. The prevalence of being underweight also increased from 3.4% to 4.3% during this time. Motor performance decreased from 11.3% to 12.3%, except in the standing long jump. Children with a high social burden showed significantly lower results (7.4% to 9.6%). Thus, our data confirm an increase in both measurements of overweight/obesity and underweight, as well as a decrease in motor performance under the pandemic conditions, especially in children from socioeconomically deprived backgrounds. These findings affirm the urgent need for action regarding health promotion measures, especially for children with high social burdens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Overweight , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , Schools , Thinness/epidemiology
2.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0266023, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775452

ABSTRACT

Most undernourished preschool-aged children have low hemoglobin and albumin levels, which leads to a higher risk of infections, including COVID-19. This study was designed to determine whether potato almond orange cookies increase weight, hemoglobin, and albumin) in undernourished preschool-aged children during the COVID-19 pandemic. A pre-post intervention study was conducted with 30 subjects during 8 weeks in which hemoglobin and albumin levels were recorded at the beginning and end. Education on balanced nutrition was provided to mothers using leaflets, flipcharts, and videos. The results showed increases in weight (0.4 kg), height (1.98 cm), hemoglobin level (0.1 g/dL), and albumin level (0.1 g/dL) accompanied by a significant increase in weight, height, and the Z-score index for weight for age, whereas those for Hb and albumin levels were not. Energy, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin C, vitamin E, and iron intake increased significantly. Further, there was a significant difference in mothers' knowledge of balanced nutrition and COVID-19 at the end of the study. Thus, high levels of cookie consumption increased the weight of underweight preschool-aged children. Future studies may wish to consider examining the issue using stunted, wasted, and anemic preschool-aged children as the research subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Citrus sinensis , Malnutrition , Prunus dulcis , Solanum tuberosum , Albumins , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Dietary Supplements , Female , Hemoglobins , Humans , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , Thinness/epidemiology
3.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(11): 3219-3226, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340779

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Patients with multiple metabolic diseases are at high risk for the occurrence and death of COVID-19. Little is known about patients with underweight and metabolically healthy obesity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of BMI and COVID-19 mortality in hospitalized patients, and also explore the association in different metabolically healthy (MHS) and unhealthy status (MUS). METHODS AND RESULTS: A retrospective cohort study based on 3019 inpatients from Wuhan was conducted. Included patients were classified into four groups according the BMI level (underweight, normal weight, overweight and obesity), and patients with at least one of the metabolic abnormalities (diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia) was defined as MUS. Multiple Cox model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR). Compared to patients with normal weight, the HRs of overweight and obesity for COVID-19 mortality were 1.91 (95%CI:1.02-3.58) and 2.54 (95%CI:1.22-5.25) respectively in total patients, and 2.58 (95%CI:1.16-5.75) and 3.89 (95%CI:1.62-9.32) respectively in the elderly. The HR of underweight for COVID-19 mortality was 4.58 (95%CI:1.56-13.48) in the elderly. For different metabolic statuses, both underweight, overweight and obesity had obviously negative association with COVID-19 mortality in total and elderly patients with MUS. However, no significance was found in non-elderly and patients with MHS. CONCLUSION: Not only overweight or obesity, but also underweight can be associated with COVID-9 mortality, especially in the elderly and in patients with MUS. More large-scale studies are needed for patients with underweight and metabolically healthy overweight or obesity.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Thinness/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , China/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity, Metabolically Benign/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(24)2020 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977742

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have reported the association of obesity with increased morbidity or mortality due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aims to investigate the relationship of obesity, as defined by the body mass index (BMI), with morbidity and mortality due to COVID-19. Data from 5628 confirmed COVID-19 patients were collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Korea. The hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality in the BMI groups were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for covariates. The odds ratios (ORs) of morbidity and diabetes in the BMI groups were analyzed using logistic regression adjusted for the same covariates. Both underweight and obesity were associated with a higher HR for mortality (adjusted HR = 2.28, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] = 1.23-4.25, p = 0.009 for underweight and adjusted HR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.10-2.66, p = 0.017 for obese). Obesity was related to higher odds of morbidity (adjusted OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.32-2.21, p < 0.001). Underweight and obesity were associated with high mortality and/or morbidity due to COVID-19 in Korea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Morbidity , Obesity/epidemiology , Thinness/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Humans , Obesity/virology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Thinness/virology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL