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1.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1094, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To ensure safe delivery of oncologic care during the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has been rapidly adopted. However, little data exist on the impact of telemedicine on quality and accessibility of oncologic care. This study assessed whether conducting an office visit for thoracic oncology patients via telemedicine affected time to treatment initiation and accessibility. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with thoracic malignancies seen by a multidisciplinary team during the first surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia (March 1 to June 30, 2020). Patients with an index visit for a new phase of care, defined as a new diagnosis, local recurrence, or newly discovered metastatic disease, were included. RESULTS: 240 distinct patients with thoracic malignancies were seen: 132 patients (55.0%) were seen initially in-person vs 108 (45.0%) via telemedicine. The majority of visits were for a diagnosis of a new thoracic cancer (87.5%). Among newly diagnosed patients referred to the thoracic oncology team, the median time from referral to initial visit was significantly shorter amongst the patients seen via telemedicine vs. in-person (median 5.0 vs. 6.5 days, p < 0.001). Patients received surgery (32.5%), radiation (24.2%), or systemic therapy (30.4%). Time from initial visit to treatment initiation by modality did not differ by telemedicine vs in-person: surgery (22 vs 16 days, p = 0.47), radiation (27.5 vs 27.5 days, p = 0.86, systemic therapy (15 vs 13 days, p = 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid adoption of telemedicine allowed timely delivery of oncologic care during the initial surge of the COVID19 pandemic by a thoracic oncology multi-disciplinary clinic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Patient Care Team , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Time Factors
2.
Lung Cancer ; 157: 79-84, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225327

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2 has spread worldwide in 2020 leading the World Health Organization to declare a pandemic. Patients with thoracic cancers have been reported at higher risk to develop severe disease, and die from COVID-19. In this setting, clinical practice recommendations for the management of patients were published. We report here how these guidelines were implemented in a routine practice setting. METHODS: We retrospectively collected the characteristics, treatment regimen and modification, as well as COVID-19 status and death for all patients with thoracic malignancies scheduled for an appointment at Institute Curie from March 23rd to April 17th 2020. RESULTS: A total of 339 patients were included. Treatment strategy was modified for a total of 110 (32 %) patients because of COVID-19; these modifications were in accordance with guidelines for 92 % of patients. The majority of dose modifications were related to immune checkpoint inhibitors, for which switch to flat dosing every 4-6 weeks was made. A total of 5 (1.5 %) patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 disease, 1 of whom died from disease complication. CONCLUSION: Our study provides a unique insight in the decision making for patients with thoracic malignancies in the setting of COVID-19 outbreak, showing how guidelines were implemented in the clinic, and what may be optimized in the clinical practice of thoracic oncology in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Thoracic Neoplasms , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy
3.
Cancer Cell ; 38(5): 602-604, 2020 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970849

ABSTRACT

To understand the real impact of COVID-19 on cancer patients, an entirely new data collection effort was initiated within the Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration (TERAVOLT). TERAVOLT reported high mortality related to COVID-19 infection in thoracic cancer patients and identified several negative prognostic factors. In this commentary, we discuss the importance and limits of patient registries to support decision-making in thoracic cancer during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Global Burden of Disease/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/virology
4.
Cancer Treat Res Commun ; 25: 100261, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-956074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: UK COVID-19 mortality rates are amongst the highest globally. Controversy exists on the vulnerability of thoracic cancer patients. We describe the characteristics and sequelae of patients with thoracic cancer treated at a UK cancer centre infected with COVID-19. METHODS: Patients undergoing care for thoracic cancer diagnosed with COVID-19 (RT-PCR/radiology/clinically) between March-June 2020 were included. Data were extracted from patient records. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients were included: 14 (43%) diagnosed by RT-PCR, 18 (57%) by radiology and/or convincing symptoms. 88% had advanced thoracic malignancies. Eleven of 14 (79%) patients diagnosed by RT-PCR and 12 of 18 (56%) patients diagnosed by radiology/clinically were hospitalised, of which four (29%) and 2 (11%) patients required high-dependency/intensive care respectively. Three (21%) patients diagnosed by RT-PCR and 2 (11%) patients diagnosed by radiology/clinically required non-invasive ventilation; none were intubated. Complications included pneumonia and sepsis (43% and 14% respectively in patients diagnosed by RT-PCR; 17% and 11% respectively in patients diagnosed by radiology/clinically). In patients receiving active cancer treatment, therapy was delayed/ceased in 10/12 (83%) and 7/11 (64%) patients diagnosed by RT-PCR and radiology/clinically respectively. Nine (28%) patients died; all were smokers. Median time from symptom onset to death was 7 days (range 3-37). CONCLUSIONS: The immediate morbidity from COVID-19 is high in thoracic cancer patients. Hospitalisation and treatment interruption rates were high. Improved risk-stratification models for UK cancer patients are urgently needed to guide safe cancer-care delivery without compromising efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Critical Care , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Thoracic Neoplasms/complications , Thoracic Neoplasms/virology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
5.
Thorac Cancer ; 11(8): 2370-2375, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-649797

ABSTRACT

To date, the impact, timeline and duration of COVID-19 pandemic remains unknown and more than ever it is necessary to provide safe pathways for cancer patients. Multiple triage systems for nonemergent surgical procedures have been published, but potentially curative cancer procedures are essential surgery rather than elective surgery. In the present and future scenario of our country, thoracic oncology teams may have the difficult decision of weighing the utility of surgical intervention against the risk for inadvertent COVID-19 exposure for patients and medical staff. In consequence, traditional pathways of surgical care must be adjusted to reduce the risk of infection and the use of resources. It is recommended that all thoracic cancer patients should be offered treatment according to the accepted standard of care until shortage of services require a progressive reduction in surgical cases. Here, we present a consensus of recommendations discussed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts on thoracic oncology and based on the best available evidence, and hope it will provide a modifiable framework of guidance for local strategy planners in thoracic cancer care services in Mexico. KEY POINTS: SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS OF THE STUDY: This article provides recommendations to guarantee the continuity of surgical care for thoracic oncology cases during COVID-19 pandemic, whilst maintaining the safety of patients and medical staff. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS: This guideline is the result of an expert consensus on thoracic surgical oncology with recommendations adapted to medical, economic and social realities of Mexico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/virology , Medical Oncology/trends , Mexico/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thoracic Neoplasms/complications , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Neoplasms/virology , Triage
6.
Lancet Oncol ; 21(7): 914-922, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597772

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early reports on patients with cancer and COVID-19 have suggested a high mortality rate compared with the general population. Patients with thoracic malignancies are thought to be particularly susceptible to COVID-19 given their older age, smoking habits, and pre-existing cardiopulmonary comorbidities, in addition to cancer treatments. We aimed to study the effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection on patients with thoracic malignancies. METHODS: The Thoracic Cancers International COVID-19 Collaboration (TERAVOLT) registry is a multicentre observational study composed of a cross-sectional component and a longitudinal cohort component. Eligibility criteria were the presence of any thoracic cancer (non-small-cell lung cancer [NSCLC], small-cell lung cancer, mesothelioma, thymic epithelial tumours, and other pulmonary neuroendocrine neoplasms) and a COVID-19 diagnosis, either laboratory confirmed with RT-PCR, suspected with symptoms and contacts, or radiologically suspected cases with lung imaging features consistent with COVID-19 pneumonia and symptoms. Patients of any age, sex, histology, or stage were considered eligible, including those in active treatment and clinical follow-up. Clinical data were extracted from medical records of consecutive patients from Jan 1, 2020, and will be collected until the end of pandemic declared by WHO. Data on demographics, oncological history and comorbidities, COVID-19 diagnosis, and course of illness and clinical outcomes were collected. Associations between demographic or clinical characteristics and outcomes were measured with odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CIs using univariable and multivariable logistic regression, with sex, age, smoking status, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease included in multivariable analysis. This is a preliminary analysis of the first 200 patients. The registry continues to accept new sites and patient data. FINDINGS: Between March 26 and April 12, 2020, 200 patients with COVID-19 and thoracic cancers from eight countries were identified and included in the TERAVOLT registry; median age was 68·0 years (61·8-75·0) and the majority had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1 (142 [72%] of 196 patients), were current or former smokers (159 [81%] of 196), had non-small-cell lung cancer (151 [76%] of 200), and were on therapy at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis (147 [74%] of 199), with 112 (57%) of 197 on first-line treatment. 152 (76%) patients were hospitalised and 66 (33%) died. 13 (10%) of 134 patients who met criteria for ICU admission were admitted to ICU; the remaining 121 were hospitalised, but were not admitted to ICU. Univariable analyses revealed that being older than 65 years (OR 1·88, 95% 1·00-3·62), being a current or former smoker (4·24, 1·70-12·95), receiving treatment with chemotherapy alone (2·54, 1·09-6·11), and the presence of any comorbidities (2·65, 1·09-7·46) were associated with increased risk of death. However, in multivariable analysis, only smoking history (OR 3·18, 95% CI 1·11-9·06) was associated with increased risk of death. INTERPRETATION: With an ongoing global pandemic of COVID-19, our data suggest high mortality and low admission to intensive care in patients with thoracic cancer. Whether mortality could be reduced with treatment in intensive care remains to be determined. With improved cancer therapeutic options, access to intensive care should be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting based on cancer specific mortality and patients' preference. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Registries/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cause of Death , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/mortality , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy
7.
Respir Med Res ; 78: 100769, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343140

ABSTRACT

The objective of this document is to formalize a degraded mode management for patients with thoracic cancers in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The proposals are based on those of the French High Council for Public Health, on published data outside the context of COVID-19, and on a concerted analysis of the risk-benefit ratio for our patients by a panel of experts specialized on thoracic oncology under the aegis of the French-Language Society of Pulmonology (SPLF)/French-language oncology group. These proposals are evolving (10 April 2020) according to the situations encountered, which will enrich it, and are to be adapted to our institutional organisations and to the evolution of resources during the COVID-19 epidemic. Patients with symptoms and/or COVID-19+ are not discussed in this document and are managed within the framework of specific channels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Chemoradiotherapy/methods , Chemoradiotherapy/standards , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Clinical Trials as Topic/standards , Humans , Mutation , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Neoadjuvant Therapy/standards , Neoplasm Metastasis , Pulmonary Medicine/methods , Pulmonary Medicine/organization & administration , Pulmonary Medicine/standards , Risk Factors , Risk Reduction Behavior , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/genetics , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/methods , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/standards
8.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 160(2): 601-605, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-46092

ABSTRACT

The extraordinary demands of managing the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the world's ability to care for patients with thoracic malignancies. As a hospital's COVID-19 population increases and hospital resources are depleted, the ability to provide surgical care is progressively restricted, forcing surgeons to prioritize among their cancer populations. Representatives from multiple cancer, surgical, and research organizations have come together to provide a guide for triaging patients with thoracic malignancies as the impact of COVID-19 evolves as each hospital.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Health Services Needs and Demand/organization & administration , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Needs Assessment/organization & administration , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Time-to-Treatment
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