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1.
Zentralbl Chir ; 146(6): 579-585, 2021 Dec.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555498

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to a major disturbance in the health care system. Many elective operations were postponed, including surgical oncology cases. Besides the need to contain hospital resources, this was also due to concerns about the safety to perform surgery during the pandemic and the impact of perioperative infections on postoperative outcomes. In this study we investigate the safety of surgery for thoracic malignancies during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed the outcome of surgery for thoracic malignancies during the first, second and third waves of the COVID-19 pandemic (from 01.01. to 30.04.2020 and from 01.01. to 30.04.2021). As a control group we included the patients who received thoracic oncology surgeries during the same period in the last 2 years before the onset of the pandemic. The primary outcome was the rate of postoperative complications. RESULTS: 236 operations were included in the pandemic group and 227 operations in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of postoperative minor complications (16.1% vs. 18.5%, p = 0.5395) or major complications (12.2% vs. 10.13 %, p = 0.5563). The risk to develop postoperative pulmonary complications was not higher in the pandemic group (odds ratio 1.193, 95% CI 0.6515-2.203, p = 0.8232). There were 5 cases with COVID-19 infection after the operation in the pandemic group. There was no difference in the rate of postoperative mortalities (2 (0.85%) vs. 1 (0.44%), p > 0.9999) There was no COVID-19 related mortality. CONCLUSION: Maintaining oncologic thoracic surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic is safe, feasible and not associated with increased risks of postoperative complications or mortalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Neoplasms , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery
4.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(6): 1870-1876, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-973851

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has decreased surgical activity, particularly in the field of oncology, because of the suspicion of a higher risk of COVID-19-related severe events. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility and safety of thoracic cancer surgery in the most severely affected European and Canadian regions during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study investigators prospectively collected data on surgical procedures for malignant thoracic diseases from January 1 to April 30, 2020. The study included patients from 6 high-volume thoracic surgery departments: Nancy and Strasbourg (France), Freiburg (Germany), Milan and Turin (Italy), and Montreal (Canada). The centers involved in this research are all located in the most severely affected regions of those countries. An assessment of COVID-19-related symptoms, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed COVID-19 infection, rates of hospital and intensive care unit admissions, and death was performed for each patient. Every deceased patient was tested for COVID-19 by PCR. RESULTS: In the study period, 731 patients who underwent 734 surgical procedures were included. In the whole cohort, 9 cases (1.2%) of COVID-19 were confirmed by PCR, including 5 in-hospital contaminants. Four patients (0.5%) needed readmission for oxygen requirements. In this subgroup, 2 patients (0.3%) needed intensive care unit and mechanical ventilatory support. The total number of deaths in the whole cohort was 22 (3%). A single death was related to COVID-19 (0.14%). CONCLUSIONS: Maintaining surgical oncologic activity in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic seems safe and feasible, with very low postoperative morbidity or mortality. To continue to offer the best care to patients who do not have COVID-19, reports on other diseases are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
5.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(4): 752-762, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-766587

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is widespread acknowledgement that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted surgical services. The European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) sent out a survey to assess what impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the practice of thoracic oncology surgery. METHODS: All ESTS members were invited (13-20 April 2020) to complete an online questionnaire of 26 questions, designed by the ESTS learning affairs committee. RESULTS: The response rate was 23.0% and the completeness rate was 91.2%. The number of treated COVID-positive cases per hospital varied from fewer than 20 cases (30.6%) to more than 200 cases (22.7%) per hospital. Most hospitals (89.1%) postponed surgical procedures. All hospitals performed patient screening with a nasopharyngeal swab, but only 6.7% routinely tested health care workers. A total of 20% of respondents reported that multidisciplinary meetings were completely cancelled and 66%, that multidisciplinary decisions were not different from normal practice. Trends were recognized in prioritizing surgical patients based on age (younger than 70), type of surgery (lobectomy or less), size of tumour (T1-2) and lymph node involvement (N1). Sixty-three percent of respondents reported that surgeons were involved in daily care of COVID-19-positive patients. Fifty-three percent mentioned that full personal protective equipment was available to them when treating a COVID-19-positive patient. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has created issues for the safety of health care workers, and surgeons have been forced to change their routine practice. However, there was no consensus about surgical priorities in lung cancer patients, demonstrating the need for the production of specific guidelines.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/trends , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Europe , Global Health , Health Care Rationing/trends , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/trends , Perioperative Care/methods , Perioperative Care/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
7.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 110(2): 692-696, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-701363

ABSTRACT

The extraordinary demands of managing the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the world's ability to care for patients with thoracic malignancies. As a hospital's COVID-19 population increases and hospital resources are depleted, the ability to provide surgical care is progressively restricted, forcing surgeons to prioritize among their cancer populations. Representatives from multiple cancer, surgical, and research organizations have come together to provide a guide for triaging patients with thoracic malignancies as the impact of COVID-19 evolves as each hospital.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgery/organization & administration , Triage , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Consensus , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgical Procedures
8.
Thorac Cancer ; 11(8): 2370-2375, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-649797

ABSTRACT

To date, the impact, timeline and duration of COVID-19 pandemic remains unknown and more than ever it is necessary to provide safe pathways for cancer patients. Multiple triage systems for nonemergent surgical procedures have been published, but potentially curative cancer procedures are essential surgery rather than elective surgery. In the present and future scenario of our country, thoracic oncology teams may have the difficult decision of weighing the utility of surgical intervention against the risk for inadvertent COVID-19 exposure for patients and medical staff. In consequence, traditional pathways of surgical care must be adjusted to reduce the risk of infection and the use of resources. It is recommended that all thoracic cancer patients should be offered treatment according to the accepted standard of care until shortage of services require a progressive reduction in surgical cases. Here, we present a consensus of recommendations discussed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts on thoracic oncology and based on the best available evidence, and hope it will provide a modifiable framework of guidance for local strategy planners in thoracic cancer care services in Mexico. KEY POINTS: SIGNIFICANT FINDINGS OF THE STUDY: This article provides recommendations to guarantee the continuity of surgical care for thoracic oncology cases during COVID-19 pandemic, whilst maintaining the safety of patients and medical staff. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS: This guideline is the result of an expert consensus on thoracic surgical oncology with recommendations adapted to medical, economic and social realities of Mexico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/virology , Medical Oncology/trends , Mexico/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thoracic Neoplasms/complications , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Neoplasms/virology , Triage
9.
Asian Cardiovasc Thorac Ann ; 28(6): 322-329, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-628544

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Healthcare resources have been mobilized to combat the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020. The Thoracic Domain of the Asian Society for Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery reports a consensus statement on the provision of thoracic cancer surgery during this pandemic. METHODS: A Thoracic Experts Panel was convened by the Society. A consensus on the provision, safety, and setting of thoracic cancer surgery during the pandemic was obtained through a Delphi process. RESULTS: Responses were received from 26 panel members (96% response rate) from 10 regions across Asia. The Society recommended that elective thoracic cancer surgery services may need to be reduced or postponed if medical resources were needed for COVID-19 patients, especially intensive care unit beds and ventilators. However, thoracic cancer surgery should proceed as normal for all solid tumors, without restrictions based on disease stage, availability of non-surgical treatment options, or patient condition (unless there is a high likelihood of postoperative intensive care unit stay). Aerosol-forming procedures should be avoided intra- and perioperatively. The surgical approach does not make a difference in terms of safety. Services for thoracic cancer patients should be offered only in hospitals that maintain isolation wards for patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Services for patients with thoracic cancer should be maintained during the COVID-19 pandemic. The position of the Society is that thoracic surgeons have a responsibility to perform good surgical management of thoracic cancer during the pandemic, to advocate for patients' rights to receive it, and to safeguard patients and staff from infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/methods , Asia , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
12.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 160(2): 601-605, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-46092

ABSTRACT

The extraordinary demands of managing the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the world's ability to care for patients with thoracic malignancies. As a hospital's COVID-19 population increases and hospital resources are depleted, the ability to provide surgical care is progressively restricted, forcing surgeons to prioritize among their cancer populations. Representatives from multiple cancer, surgical, and research organizations have come together to provide a guide for triaging patients with thoracic malignancies as the impact of COVID-19 evolves as each hospital.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Thoracic Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Health Services Needs and Demand/organization & administration , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Needs Assessment/organization & administration , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Time-to-Treatment
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