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1.
Port J Card Thorac Vasc Surg ; 28(2): 29-32, 2021 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754328

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 pandemic forced a change in health care resources and provision due to the emergence of a new group of patients, requiring extraordinary protective measures and the adoption of new organization for the treatment of urgent or priority COVID-19 negative patients. We reviewed our practice during the first pandemic period to evaluate our surgical outcomes and identify if patients COVID-19 negative submitted to thoracic surgery had an increased risk of being infected or die. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our surgical results between 11th March and 15th May 2020. Thirty patients underwent thoracic surgery at the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery of Centro Hospitalar Universitário de São João. RESULTS: None of the patients was COVID-19 positive and cross-transmission of the disease was not recognized. The majority of patients were admitted from home, with a high priority indication, namely an oncological disease. There was only one case of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSION: During the first wave of the pandemic it was safe to be admitted and submitted to thoracic surgery at CHUSJ. Our patients, including oncological patients, received the adequate surgical treatment without an increase of risk of death or infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
4.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 1355, 2022 01 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1661977

ABSTRACT

Accurately predicting red blood cell (RBC) transfusion requirements in cardiothoracic (CT) surgery could improve blood inventory management and be used as a surrogate marker for assessing hemorrhage risk preoperatively. We developed a machine learning (ML) method to predict intraoperative RBC transfusions in CT surgery. A detailed database containing time-stamped clinical variables for all CT surgeries from 5/2014-6/2019 at a single center (n = 2410) was used for model development. After random forest feature selection, surviving features were inputs for ML algorithms using five-fold cross-validation. The dataset was updated with 437 additional cases from 8/2019-8/2020 for validation. We developed and validated a hybrid ML method given the skewed nature of the dataset. Our Gaussian Process (GP) regression ML algorithm accurately predicted RBC transfusion amounts of 0 and 1-3 units (root mean square error, RMSE 0.117 and 1.705, respectively) and our GP classification ML algorithm accurately predicted 4 + RBC units transfused (area under the curve, AUC = 0.826). The final prediction is the regression result if classification predicted < 4 units transfused, or the classification result if 4 + units were predicted. We developed and validated an ML method to accurately predict intraoperative RBC transfusions in CT surgery using local data.


Subject(s)
Machine Learning , Thoracic Surgery/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
5.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 23(2): 75-83, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591832

ABSTRACT

The impact of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced the governments worldwide to deal with an unprecedented health crisis. The aim of this review is to summarize what happened to cardiac surgery worldwide during the first wave of this pandemic. A literature search was performed to extrapolate key concepts regarding guidelines and reorganization of cardiac surgery wards during COVID-19. Supporting literature was also included to discuss the hot topics related to COVID-19 and cardiac surgery. Hence, both official documents from national scientific societies and single- or multiple-center experiences during the pandemics are reviewed and discussed. In Italy, the first western country hit by the pandemic, two different models were proposed to cope with the need for ICU/ward beds and to reallocate cardiac surgical services: Hub-and-Spoke system ('Hubs', dedicated to perform urgent and nondeferrable surgery, and 'Spokes', turned into COVID centers) and/or a progressive reduction in surgical activity. Worldwide, several guidelines/consensus statements were published, suggesting how to deal with the outbreak. Two different approaches for stratifying surgical indications were proposed: dynamic, based on the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients; static, based only on the severity of the cardiovascular disease. Moreover, the importance of personal protective equipment was stressed. Several measures should have been adopted to deal with an unprecedented need for healthcare resources allocation to care for COVID-19 patients, putting the healthcare systems under serious stress. Cardiac surgery has, as have most surgical activities, been asked to reduce its own activity, giving priority to emergency and nondeferrable cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Thoracic Surgery/organization & administration , Humans
6.
7.
Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 70(3): 265-272, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The first surge in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection had a significant impact on health care institutions. Understanding how the pandemic affected general thoracic surgery would provide valuable data for establishing a health care protocol for upcoming surges. METHODS: A questionnaire survey on coronavirus disease-related patient statistics and health care was conducted between February 2020 and June 2020 across 14 facilities affiliated with the Kanagawa General Thoracic Surgery Study Group. RESULTS: The average number of newly referred patients from February to June 2020 was 65% of that during the same period in 2019. Six facilities placed restrictions on medical care services, among which four restricted surgeries. At all institutions and those placed on surgical restriction, the total number of surgeries under general anesthesia was 92% and 78%, the total number of primary lung cancers was 94% and 86%, and the total number of surgeries for pneumothorax was 71% and 77% of that in the preceding year, respectively. Infection control and insufficient resources of the medical material were the most influential factors impacting the medical institutions' decision to restrict the services provided. CONCLUSIONS: Restrictions on surgery had a significant impact on the care provided by general thoracic surgery departments. To avoid patient inconvenience, establishing a collaborative system that refers patients to operational medical institutions in case of medical treatment restrictions may be useful.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1374: 33-40, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432494

ABSTRACT

In the present study, we retrospectively evaluated outcomes in 8 patients (mean age 67 ± 7, range 55-77 years; male/female 7/1) who acquired nosocomial COVID-19 infection postoperatively out of the 39 adults who underwent elective thoracic surgery in November 2020. All patients were tested negative for COVID-19 on admission. The mortality rate in the eight patients was 25%. The surviving six patients were discharged in a good clinical condition. Fatal outcomes were due to the development of severe and unrelenting acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and were associated with preoperatively reduced serum albumin (<3 g/dL), an open surgical approach, oxygen saturation <90% at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis, and the real-time PCR cycle threshold (Ct) value <20. A high mortality rate indicates a need for systematic and frequent COVID-19 screening in patients scheduled for elective thoracic surgery and the use of minimally invasive procedures whenever feasible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross Infection , Thoracic Surgery , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 160(4): e237-e238, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1382590
11.
Pneumologie ; 75(12): 960-970, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309477

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the implementation of measures to prevent perioperative COVID-19 in thoracic surgery during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic 2020 allowing a continued surgical treatment of patients. METHODS: The implemented preventive measures in patient management of the thoracic surgery department of the Asklepios Lung Clinic Munich-Gauting, Germany were retrospectively analyzed. Postoperative COVID-19 incidence before and after implementation of preventive measures was investigated. Patients admitted for thoracic surgical procedures between March and May 2020 were included in the study. Patient characteristics were analyzed. For the early detection of putative postoperative COVID-19 symptoms, typical post-discharge symptomatology of thoracic surgery patients was compared to non-surgical patients hospitalized for COVID-19. RESULTS: Thirty-five surgical procedures and fifty-seven surgical procedures were performed before and after implementation of the preventive measures, respectively. Three patients undergoing thoracic surgery before implementation of preventive measures developed a COVID-19 pneumonia post-discharge. After implementation of preventive measures, no postoperative COVID-19 cases were identified. Fever, dyspnea, dry cough and diarrhea were significantly more prevalent in COVID-19 patients compared to normally recovering thoracic surgery patients, while anosmia, phlegm, low energy levels, body ache and nausea were similarly frequent in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the lessons learned during the first pandemic wave, we here provide a blueprint for successful easily implementable preventive measures minimizing SARS-CoV-2 transmission to thoracic surgery patients perioperatively. While symptoms of COVID-19 and the normal postoperative course of thoracic surgery patients substantially overlap, we found dyspnea, fever, cough, and diarrhea significantly more prevalent in COVID-19 patients than in normally recovering thoracic surgery patients. These symptoms should trigger further diagnostic testing for postoperative COVID-19 in thoracic surgery patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Aftercare , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
14.
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 69(4): 294-307, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281759

ABSTRACT

Based on a longtime voluntary registry, founded by the German Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (GSTCVS) in 1980, well-defined data of all cardiac, thoracic and vascular surgery procedures performed in 78 German heart surgery departments during the year 2020 are analyzed. Under the more than extraordinary conditions of the ongoing worldwide coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, a total of 161,817 procedures were submitted to the registry. A total of 92,809 of these operations are summarized as heart surgery procedures in a classical sense. The unadjusted in-hospital survival rate for the 29,444 isolated coronary artery bypass grafting procedures (relationship on-/off-pump 3.6:1) was 97.2%. For the 35,469 isolated heart valve procedures, (17,471 transcatheter interventions included), the survival rate was 96.7%. Concerning short- and long-term circulatory support, a total of 2,852 extracorporeal life support/extracorporeal membrane oxygenation implantations, respectively, 843 assist device implantations (left/right/biventricular assist device, total artificial device), were registered. In 2020, the number of isolated heart transplantations increased to 340, a rise of 2.1% compared with the previous year. The isolated lung transplantations amounted to 291, a decrease of 6.4%.This annually updated registry of the GSTCVS represents voluntary public reporting by accumulating actual information for nearly all heart surgical procedures in Germany, constitutes advancements in heart medicine, and represents a basis for quality management for all participating institutions. In addition, the registry demonstrates that the provision of cardiac surgery in Germany is up to date, appropriate, and nationwide patient treatment is guaranteed all the time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Heart Diseases/surgery , Quality Indicators, Health Care , Registries , Societies, Medical , Thoracic Surgery , Comorbidity , Germany/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Clin Lung Cancer ; 23(2): 91-94, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267629

ABSTRACT

As the COVID-19 pandemic ravages the whole world, frontline doctors are tirelessly fighting to contain and manage the disastrous effects of the virus. However, thoracic surgeons will also become frontline doctors, because everyone around them is likely to be infected after the closed-loop management of the hospital. Stress, difficulty, fears, physical and psychological burnout and lowered morale are some side effects. We feature the perspectives of thoracic surgeons at the epicenter of the COVID-19 fight in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, which highlight the emotions, measures, motivation and belief of thoracic surgeons while they work on frontlines.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/therapy , Cancer Care Facilities , Occupational Stress , Physician's Role , Thoracic Surgery , China , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Med Lav ; 112(2): 107-114, 2021 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196171

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A worldwide personal protection equipment (PPE) shortage has emerged during COVID-19 pandemic, contributing to the high incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among health care providers. To address this lack of PEE, new solutions have been researched. Among those, full-face snorkeling masks demonstrated to be an interesting option. Among surgical specialties otolaryngologists and thoracic surgeons are at high risk of infection, due to the close contact with airway secretions. OBJECTIVES: We tested the comfort and usability of a modified full-face snorkeling mask (Ocean Reef Mask Aria QR+) as a protective device for otolaryngologic and thoracic surgeries. METHODS: The mask was customized with a 3D-printed adaptor supporting many industrial filter types, including FFP3 and heat and moisture ex- changers (HME). We evaluated surgical performances of the mask, both subjectively, with a questionnaire filled in by the surgeons, as well as objectively, monitoring transcutaneous PCO2 and PO2 values of surgeons during surgical procedures. RESULTS: The modified full-face snorkeling mask was tested during 9 otolaryngologic and 15 thoracic surgery procedures. The device demonstrated very good overall vision quality with some limitations regarding lateral vision and almost no difficulties in usability. Water condensation into the mask was absent in almost every case. Both PO2 and PCO2 param- eters remained within normal ranges during every procedure. DISCUSSION: The modified full-face snorkeling mask can be an innovative PPE. In the current COVID-19 pandemic scenario, the worldwide shortage of protective masks and goggles may exploit this ready-to-use and low-cost solution, especially for high-risk surgical procedures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Otolaryngology , Thoracic Surgery , Humans , Masks , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , User-Computer Interface
20.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(4): 1402-1404, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176533
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