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1.
J Surg Res ; 274: 213-223, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707290

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the current era of episode-based hospital reimbursements, it is important to determine the impact of hospital size on contemporary national trends in surgical technique and outcomes of lobectomy. METHODS: Patients aged >18 y undergoing open and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy from 2008 to 2014 were identified using insurance claims data from the National Inpatient Sample. The impact of hospital size on surgical approach and outcomes for both open and VATS lobectomy were analyzed. RESULTS: Over the 7-y period, 202,668 lobectomies were performed nationally, including 71,638 VATS and 131,030 open. Although the overall number of lobectomies decreased (30,058 in 2008 versus 27,340 in 2014, P < 0.01), the proportion of VATS lobectomies increased (24.0% versus 46.9%), and open lobectomies decreased (76.0% versus 53.0%, all P < 0.01). When stratified by hospital size, small hospitals had a significant increase in the proportion of open lobectomies (6.4%-12.2%; P = 0.01) and trend toward increased number of VATS lobectomies (2.7%-12.2%). Annual mortality rates for VATS (range: 1.0%-1.9%) and open (range: 1.9%-2.4%) lobectomy did not significantly differ over time (all P > 0.05) but did decrease among small hospitals (4.1%-1.3% and 5.1%-1.1% for VATS and open, respectively; both P < 0.05). After adjusting for confounders, hospital bed size was not a predictor of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of VATS lobectomies has increased over time, more so among small hospitals. Mortality rates for open lobectomy remain consistently higher than VATS lobectomy (range 0.4%-1.4%) but did not significantly differ over time. This data can help benchmark hospital performance in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Thoracotomy
2.
Surg Endosc ; 36(7): 5501-5509, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Innovations in surgical instruments have made single-port surgery more widely accepted and lead to a reduced demand for surgical assistants. As COVID-19 has ravaged the world, maintaining minimum medical staffing requirements and proper social distancing have become major topics of interest. We sought to evaluate the feasibility of applying the unisurgeon approach in single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery aided by a robotic camera holder. METHODS: Operative time, blood loss, setup time, postoperative hospital stays, and the number of participating surgeons in single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic lung resections were gathered for investigation after the introduction of the ENDOFIXexo robotic endoscope holder system. In this cohort, we collected 213 patients who underwent single port video thoracoscope surgery, including 57 patients underwent robotic endoscope arm assisted surgery and case-matched 52 patients in the robotic arm-assisted group with patients in the human-assisted group through propensity score-matched analysis. RESULTS: In wedge resection, a single surgeon was able to completely operate on all lobes of target lesions. However, for anatomical resections, namely segmentectomy, the success rate was 95%, and for lobectomy, the success rate was only 64%. No significant differences between setup times, blood loss, or operative times between the two groups were observed. CONCLUSIONS: When an experienced uniport surgeon is assisted by a robotic endoscope holder, wedge resection is the most suitable procedure to be performed through unisurgeon single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without increasing setup time, operative time, or short-term complications. Verification of the technique's applicability for use in anatomic resections requires further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Endoscopes , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Operative Time , Pneumonectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods
3.
Thorac Cancer ; 12(21): 2865-2872, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494370

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, has high morbidity rates. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) as day surgery makes surgical treatment ideally in time with the same quality of medical care. This study aimed to assess the safety of stage I NSCLC patients who underwent VATS at a day surgery center. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics and tumor features of VATS patients at a single center, West China Hospital, from June 1, 2019, to December 31, 2020. Patients fulfilled all inclusion criteria, did not meet any exclusion criteria and underwent wedge resection, segmentectomy, or lobectomy with systematic lymph node dissection. RESULTS: The median patient age was 43 (range, 19-67) years. Of the 209 patients, most were women. A total of 108 (51.7%) patients underwent segmentectomy, 87 (41.6%) lobectomy, and 14 (6.7%) wedge resection with systematic lymph node dissection. According to the AJCC/UICC eighth edition of lung cancer stage grouping, stages IA, IA1, IA2, and IA3 were 195 (93.3%), 122 (58.4%), 50 (23.9%), and one (0.5%), respectively. A total of 36 (17.2%) patients were stage 0. Adenocarcinoma was predominantly the postoperative pathological diagnosis, as only 14 (6.7%) were benign. A total of 201 (96.17%) patients were discharged without a chest tube. The most common chief complaints were cough, incisional pain, and shortness of breath. No severe complications or life-threatening emergencies were observed. CONCLUSIONS: The day surgery mode of VATS for stage I NSCLC is safe and feasible, which makes surgical treatment ideally in time for stage I NSCLC patients with the same quality of medical care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/methods , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
4.
Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 68(5): 554-556, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453868

ABSTRACT

We describe a novel technique for the creation of a pleural tent and pleurectomy via the use of a laparoscopic hernia balloon. In this method a Spacemaker™ Structural Balloon Trocar (Covidien, USA) is tunnelled under the pleura at the site of thoracotomy or video assisted thoracoscopic surgery port and incrementally inflated under vision. This method is less traumatic than traditional methods, is more likely to provide an intact pleural tent, and allows the surgeon to operate in a near bloodless operative field.


Subject(s)
Osteosarcoma/surgery , Pleura/surgery , Pleural Neoplasms/surgery , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Thoracotomy/methods , Dissection , Humans , Male , Osteosarcoma/secondary , Pleural Neoplasms/secondary , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/instrumentation , Thoracotomy/instrumentation , Young Adult
5.
Surg Today ; 51(3): 447-451, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453756

ABSTRACT

Accumulation of experience and advances in techniques and instruments have enabled surgeons to perform video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) safely for sublobar resection, including segmentectomy and wedge resection. A key to successful VATS sublobar resection is to have adequate resection margins and the appropriate use of articulated surgical staplers is essential for this purpose. The SigniaTM stapling system (Covidien Japan, Tokyo) has been used extensively in the fields of thoracic surgery. Its features include high maneuverability with fully powered articulation, rotation, clamping, and firing, which the surgeon can control with one hand. We introduce the "sliding technique" using the SigniaTM system, which allows for adjustment of the resection lines of the pulmonary parenchyma to optimize safe surgical margins with minimal stapler movement, and without repetitively moving the stapler in and out of the pleural cavity, during VATS sublobar resection.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Lung/surgery , Margins of Excision , Pneumonectomy/instrumentation , Pneumonectomy/methods , Surgical Staplers , Surgical Stapling/instrumentation , Surgical Stapling/methods , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/instrumentation , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Humans , Safety
6.
J Surg Oncol ; 123(7): 1633-1639, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: For patients with bilateral pulmonary metastases, staged resections have historically been the preferred surgical intervention. During the spring of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic made patient travel to the hospital challenging and necessitated reduction in operative volume so that resources could be conserved. We report our experience with synchronous bilateral metastasectomies for the treatment of disease in both lungs. METHODS: Patients with bilateral pulmonary metastases who underwent simultaneous bilateral resections were compared with a cohort of patients who underwent staged resections. We used nearest-neighbor propensity score (1:1) matching to adjust for confounders. Perioperative outcomes were compared between groups using paired statistical analysis techniques. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2020, 36 patients underwent bilateral simultaneous metastasectomies. We matched 31 pairs of patients. The length of stay was significantly shorter in patients undergoing simultaneous resection (median 3 vs. 8 days, p < .001) and operative time was shorter (156 vs. 235.5 min, p < .001) when compared to the sum of both procedures in the staged group. The groups did not significantly differ with regard to postoperative complications. CONCLUSION: In a carefully selected patient population, simultaneous bilateral metastasectomy is a safe option. A single procedure confers benefits for both the patient as well as the hospital resource system.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Metastasectomy/methods , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pneumonectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Thoracotomy/methods
7.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(3): e181-e182, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796736

ABSTRACT

Concomitant coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) is a major risk factor for complications in any type of surgical procedure, especially in thoracic surgery, were the primary organ involved, the lung, is manipulated to perform parenchymal resection. However, it is not clear whether previous infection from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may lead to increased morbidity and mortality for subsequent procedures once radiologic resolution is achieved. We report a young patient with lung cancer who successfully underwent a right upper lobectomy for primary adenocarcinoma by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with no complication in the early postoperative phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonectomy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Operative Time , Pandemics , Postoperative Period
9.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(3): 598-604, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733389

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is currently a lack of clinical data on the novel beta-coronavirus infection [caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] and concomitant primary lung cancer. Our goal was to report our experiences with 5 patients treated for lung cancer while infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 5 adult patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 who were admitted to our thoracic surgery unit between 29 January 2020 and 4 March 2020 for surgical treatment of a primary lung cancer. Clinical data and outcomes are reported. RESULTS: All patients were men with a mean age of 74.0 years (range 67-80). Four of the 5 patients (80%) reported chronic comorbidities. Surgery comprised minimally invasive lobectomy (2 patients) and segmentectomy (1 patient), lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection (1 patient) and pneumonectomy (1 patient). Mean chest drain duration was 12.4 days (range 8-22); mean hospital stay was 33.8 days (range 21-60). SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms were fever (3 patients), persistent cough (3 patients), diarrhoea (2 patients) and syncope (2 patients); 1 patient reported no symptoms. Morbidity related to surgery was 60%; 30-day mortality was 40%. Two patients (1 with a right pneumonectomy, 74 years old; 1 with a lobectomy with chest wall resection and reconstruction, 70 years old), developed SARS-CoV-2-related lung failure leading to death 60 and 32 days after surgery, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Lung cancer surgery may represent a high-risk factor for developing a severe case of coronavirus disease 2019, particularly in patients with advanced stages of lung cancer. Additional strategies are needed to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection during treatment for lung cancer.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Sampling Studies , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Treatment Outcome
10.
A A Pract ; 14(7): e01244, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601754

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus pandemic may be particularly hazardous to health care workers. Airway management is an aerosol-producing high-risk procedure. To minimize the production of airborne droplets, including pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), from the endotracheal tube during procedures requiring lung deflation, we devised a technique to mitigate the risk of infection transmission to health care personnel.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Empyema, Pleural/surgery , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Laparoscopy/instrumentation , One-Lung Ventilation/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Bronchoscopy/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
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