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2.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 61(4): 854-859, 2022 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604485

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the coronavirus 2019 pandemic on elective and acute thoracic aortic surgery in the Netherlands. METHODS: The Netherlands Heart Registration database was used to compare the volume of elective and acute surgery on the thoracic aorta in 2019 and 2020, starting from week 11 in both years. A sub-analysis was done to assess the impact of the pandemic on high-volume and low-volume aortic centres. RESULTS: During the pandemic, the number of elective thoracic aortic operations declined by 18% [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.82 [0.73-0.91]; P < 0.01]. The decline in volume of elective surgery was significant in both high-volume (IRR 0.82 [0.71-0.94]; P < 0.01) and low-volume aortic centres (IRR 0.81 [0.68-0.98]; P = 0.03). The overall number of acute aortic operations during the pandemic remained similar to that in 2019 (505 vs 499; P = 0.85), but an increased share of these operations occurred at high-volume centres. The number of acute operations performed in high-volume centres increased by 20% (IRR 1.20 [1.01-1.42]; P = 0.04), while the number of acute operations performed in low-volume centres decreased by 17% (IRR 0.83 [0.69-1.00]; P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus 2019 pandemic led to a significant decrease in elective thoracic aortic surgery but did not cause a change in the volume of acute thoracic aortic surgery in the Netherlands. Moreover, the pandemic led to a centralization of care for acute thoracic aortic surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Aorta, Thoracic/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Pandemics
3.
Zhongguo Fei Ai Za Zhi ; 23(3): 133-135, 2020 03 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389585

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, China diagnosed the first patient with 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), and the following development of the epidemic had a huge impact on China and the whole world. For patients with lung occupying lesions, the whole process of diagnosis and treatment can not be carried out as usual due to the epidemic. For thoracic surgeons, the timing of surgical intervention should be very carefully considered. All thoracic surgeons in China should work together to develop the proper procedures for the diagnosis and treatment in this special situation, and continuously update the recommendations based on epidemic changes and further understanding of COVID-19. Here, we only offer some preliminary suggestions based on our own knowledge for further reference and discussion.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Lung Diseases , Pneumonia, Viral , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Epidemics , Humans , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/surgery , Patient Care Planning , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Surg Innov ; 29(2): 292-294, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348277

ABSTRACT

Data from animal models is now available to initiate assessment of human safety and feasibility of wide-angle three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography (3D ICE) to guide point-of-care implantation of percutaneous left ventricular assist devices in critical care settings. Assessment of these combined new technologies could be best achieved within a surgical institution with pre-existing expertise in separate utilization of ICE and Impella.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart-Assist Devices , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Animals , Echocardiography/methods , Point-of-Care Systems , Treatment Outcome
5.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 112(5): 1707-1715, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347031

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Cardiothoracic surgical patients are at risk of increased coronavirus disease severity. Several important factors influence the administration of the coronavirus disease vaccine in the perioperative period. This guidance statement outlines current information regarding vaccine types, summarizes recommendations regarding appropriate timing of administration, and provides information regarding side effects in the perioperative period for cardiac and thoracic surgical patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Perioperative Care/methods , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Vaccination/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Pneumologie ; 75(12): 960-970, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309477

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the implementation of measures to prevent perioperative COVID-19 in thoracic surgery during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic 2020 allowing a continued surgical treatment of patients. METHODS: The implemented preventive measures in patient management of the thoracic surgery department of the Asklepios Lung Clinic Munich-Gauting, Germany were retrospectively analyzed. Postoperative COVID-19 incidence before and after implementation of preventive measures was investigated. Patients admitted for thoracic surgical procedures between March and May 2020 were included in the study. Patient characteristics were analyzed. For the early detection of putative postoperative COVID-19 symptoms, typical post-discharge symptomatology of thoracic surgery patients was compared to non-surgical patients hospitalized for COVID-19. RESULTS: Thirty-five surgical procedures and fifty-seven surgical procedures were performed before and after implementation of the preventive measures, respectively. Three patients undergoing thoracic surgery before implementation of preventive measures developed a COVID-19 pneumonia post-discharge. After implementation of preventive measures, no postoperative COVID-19 cases were identified. Fever, dyspnea, dry cough and diarrhea were significantly more prevalent in COVID-19 patients compared to normally recovering thoracic surgery patients, while anosmia, phlegm, low energy levels, body ache and nausea were similarly frequent in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the lessons learned during the first pandemic wave, we here provide a blueprint for successful easily implementable preventive measures minimizing SARS-CoV-2 transmission to thoracic surgery patients perioperatively. While symptoms of COVID-19 and the normal postoperative course of thoracic surgery patients substantially overlap, we found dyspnea, fever, cough, and diarrhea significantly more prevalent in COVID-19 patients than in normally recovering thoracic surgery patients. These symptoms should trigger further diagnostic testing for postoperative COVID-19 in thoracic surgery patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Aftercare , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects
13.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 162(6): 1654-1664, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108501

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As the Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic continues, appropriate management of thoracic complications from Coronavirus Disease 2019 needs to be determined. Our objective is to evaluate which complications occurring in patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 require thoracic surgery and to report the early outcomes. METHODS: This study is a single-institution retrospective case series at New York University Langone Health Manhattan campus evaluating patients with confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019 infection who were hospitalized and required thoracic surgery from March 13 to July 18, 2020. RESULTS: From March 13 to August 8, 2020, 1954 patients were admitted to New York University Langone Health for Coronavirus Disease 2019. Of these patients, 13 (0.7%) required thoracic surgery. Two patients (15%) required surgery for complicated pneumothoraces, 5 patients (38%) underwent pneumatocele resection, 1 patient (8%) had an empyema requiring decortication, and 5 patients (38%) developed a hemothorax that required surgery. Three patients (23%) died after surgery, 9 patients (69%) were discharged, and 1 patient (8%) remains in the hospital. No healthcare providers were positive for Coronavirus Disease 2019 after the surgeries. CONCLUSIONS: Given the 77% survival, with a majority of patients already discharged from the hospital, thoracic surgery is feasible for the small percent of patients hospitalized with Coronavirus Disease 2019 who underwent surgery for complex pneumothorax, pneumatocele, empyema, or hemothorax. Our experience also supports the safety of surgical intervention for healthcare providers who operate on patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/surgery , Empyema, Pleural/surgery , Hemothorax/surgery , Pandemics , Pneumothorax/surgery , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/methods , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Empyema, Pleural/diagnosis , Empyema, Pleural/etiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hemothorax/diagnosis , Hemothorax/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Pneumothorax/diagnosis , Pneumothorax/etiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
14.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(3): 747-752, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1095845

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: While the United States (US) population at large is rapidly diversifying, cardiothoracic surgery is among the least diverse specialties in terms of racial and gender diversity. Lack of diversity is detrimental to patient care, physician well-being, and the relevance of cardiothoracic surgery on our nation's health. Recent events, including the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests, have further accentuated the gross inequities that underrepresented minorities face in our country and have reignited conversations on how to address bias and systemic racism within our institutions. The field of cardiothoracic surgery has a responsibility to adopt a culture of diversity and inclusion. This kind of systemic change is daunting and overwhelming. With bias ubiquitously entangled with everyday experiences, it can be difficult to know where to start. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Workforce on Diversity and Inclusion presents this approach for addressing diversity and inclusion in cardiothoracic surgery. This framework was adapted from a model developed by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities and includes information and recommendations generated from our literature review on diversity and inclusion. A MEDLINE search was conducted using keywords "diversity," "inclusion," and "surgery," and approaches to diversity and inclusion were drawn from publications in medicine as well as non-healthcare fields. Recommendations were generated and approved by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Executive Committee. We present an overarching framework that conceptualizes diversity and inclusion efforts in a series of concentric spheres of influence, from the global environment to the cardiothoracic community, institution, and the individual surgeon. This framework organizes the approach to diversity and inclusion, grouping interventions by level while maintaining a broader perspective of how each sphere is interconnected. We include the following key recommendations within the spheres of influence: It is important to note that each of the spheres of influence is interconnected. Interventions to improve diversity must be coordinated across spheres for concerted change. Altogether, this multilevel framework (global environment, cardiothoracic community, institution, and individual) offers an organized approach for cardiothoracic surgery to assess, improve, and sustain progress in diversity and inclusion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialties, Surgical , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Comorbidity , Humans , Minority Groups , United States/epidemiology , Workforce
15.
Curr Oncol ; 28(1): 940-949, 2021 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1094234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has invariably changed the way lung cancer surgical care is provided in Canada. Despite relevant management guidelines, the way in which cancer care has been affected has yet to be described for thoracic surgical populations. Routine lung cancer physiologic and staging assessments are unique in that they are droplet producing and aerosolizing procedures. Our objective was to quantify the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on surgical lung cancer care as perceived by practicing thoracic surgeons during the first wave of the pandemic in Canada. METHODS: An electronic survey was distributed to members of the Canadian Association of Thoracic Surgeons. The survey was designed to determine surgeon perception of lung cancer preoperative care during the Canadian pandemic-instilled period of resource reallocation compared to standard care. Planned analyses were exploratory in nature; with count and frequency distributions of responses quantified. RESULTS: Fifty-three thoracic surgeons completed the survey. Responses were collected from all Canadian provinces. Little change in access to preoperative imaging was noted. However, a significant decrease in access to lung function and bronchoscopy testing occurred. Pulmonary surgery was perceived to be lengthier with reduced operating theater availability. Despite decreased OR access, only 40% of surgeons were aware of respective institutional mitigation strategies. SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on standard lung cancer care preoperative workup. Further inquiry using institutional data is warranted to quantify its impact on cancer patient outcomes. Assessing the extent and effects of newly present barriers to standard lung cancer care is essential in forming appropriate mitigation strategies and planning for future pandemic waves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Preoperative Care/methods , Bronchoscopy , Canada , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Operating Rooms , Operative Time , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thoracic Surgical Procedures
16.
Med J Aust ; 214(1): 40-44, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067921

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a contagious disease that is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Health care workers are at risk of infection from aerosolisation of respiratory secretions, droplet and contact spread. There are a number of procedures that represent a high risk of aerosol generation during cardiothoracic surgery. It is important that adequate training, equipment and procedures are in place to reduce that risk. RECOMMENDATIONS: We provide a number of key recommendations, which reduce the risk of aerosol generation during cardiothoracic surgery and help protect patients and staff. These include general measures such as patient risk stratification, appropriate use of personal protective equipment, consideration to delay surgery in positive patients, and careful attention to theatre planning and preparation. There are also recommended procedural interventions during airway management, transoesophageal echocardiography, cardiopulmonary bypass, chest drain management and specific cardiothoracic surgical procedures. Controversies exist regarding the management of low risk patients undergoing procedures at high risk of aerosol generation, and recommendations for these patients will change depending on the regional prevalence, risk of community transmission and the potential for asymptomatic patients attending for these procedures. CHANGES IN MANAGEMENT AS A RESULT OF THIS STATEMENT: This statement reflects changes in management based on expert opinion, national guidelines and available evidence. Our knowledge with regard to COVID-19 continues to evolve and with this, guidance may change and develop. Our colleagues are urged to follow national guidelines and institutional recommendations regarding best practices to protect their patients and themselves. ENDORSED BY: Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons and the Anaesthetic Continuing Education Cardiac Thoracic Vascular and Perfusion Special Interest Group.


Subject(s)
Aerosols , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Anesthesia , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Consensus , Health Personnel/education , Humans , New Zealand , Societies, Medical , Thoracic Surgical Procedures
17.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(5): 991-996, 2020 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066298

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We reviewed the incidence of coronavirus disease 2019 cases and the postoperative outcomes of patients who had thoracic surgery during the beginning and at the highest point of transmission in our community. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients who had undergone elective thoracic surgery from 12 February 2020 to 30 April 2020 and were symptomatic or tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection within 14 days after surgery, with a focus on their complications and potential deaths. RESULTS: Out of 101 surgical procedures, including 57 primary oncological resections, 6 lung transplants and 18 emergency procedures, only 5 cases of coronavirus disease 2019 were identified, 3 in the immediate postoperative period and 2 as outpatients. All 5 patients had cancer; the median age was 64 years. The main virus-related symptom was fever (80%), and the median onset of coronavirus disease 2019 was 3 days. Although 80% of the patients who had positive test results for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 required in-hospital care, none of them were considered severe or critical and none died. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that, in properly selected cases, with short preoperative in-hospital stays, strict isolation and infection control protocols, managed by a dedicated multidisciplinary team, a surgical procedure could be performed with a relatively low risk for the patient.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Postoperative Complications , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Treatment Outcome
19.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 110(4): e333-e334, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023473

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic pointed out that the need to ensure emergent surgery in patients positive for infection is no longer hypothetical. Among emergency procedures, thoracic surgical operations are frequent. A standardized surgical pathway is mandatory to achieve effective and safe management of this subset of patients. We briefly present the protocol adopted by our thoracic surgery division.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic , Health Facilities/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Curr Oncol ; 27(3): e313-e317, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024671

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of covid-19 has the potential to change the way in which the health care system can accommodate various patient populations and might affect patients with non-covid-19 problems. The Quebec Lung Cancer Network, which oversees thoracic oncology services in the province of Quebec under the direction of the Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, convened to develop recommendations to deal with the potential disruption of services in thoracic oncology in the province of Quebec. The summary provided here has been adapted from the original document posted on the Programme québécois du cancer Web site at: https://www.msss.gouv.qc.ca/professionnels/documents/coronavirus-2019-ncov/PJ1_Recommandations_oncologie-thoracique-200415.pdf. Methods: Plans to optimize the health care system and potentially to prioritize services were discussed with respect to various levels of activity. For each level-of-activity scenario, suggestions were made for the services and treatments to prioritize and for those that might have to be postponed, as well as for potential alternatives to care. Results: The principal recommendation is that the cancer centre executive committee and the multidisciplinary tumour board always try to find a solution to maintain standard-of-care therapy for all patients with thoracic tumours, using novel approaches to treatment and the adoption of a network approach to care, as needed. Conclusions: The effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the health care system remains unpredictable and requires that cancer teams unite and offer the most efficient and innovative therapies to all patients under the various conditions that might be forced upon them.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiotherapy , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/therapy , Thoracic Surgical Procedures , Triage , Administration, Oral , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Disease Management , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Mediastinoscopy , Medical Oncology , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , Radiosurgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Small Cell Lung Carcinoma/diagnosis , Thoracoscopy
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