Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 157
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
BMC Neurol ; 22(1): 22, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622217

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We investigated the impact of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the resulting lockdown on reperfusion treatments and door-to-treatment times during the first surge in Dutch comprehensive stroke centers. Furthermore, we studied the association between COVID-19-status and treatment times. METHODS: We included all patients receiving reperfusion treatment in 17 Dutch stroke centers from May 11th, 2017, until May 11th, 2020. We collected baseline characteristics, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, onset-to-door time (ODT), door-to-needle time (DNT), door-to-groin time (DGT) and COVID-19-status at admission. Parameters during the lockdown (March 15th, 2020 until May 11th, 2020) were compared with those in the same period in 2019, and between groups stratified by COVID-19-status. We used nationwide data and extrapolated our findings to the increasing trend of EVT numbers since May 2017. RESULTS: A decline of 14% was seen in reperfusion treatments during lockdown, with a decline in both IVT and EVT delivery. DGT increased by 12 min (50 to 62 min, p-value of < 0.001). Furthermore, median NIHSS-scores were higher in COVID-19 - suspected or positive patients (7 to 11, p-value of 0.004), door-to-treatment times did not differ significantly when stratified for COVID-19-status. CONCLUSIONS: During the first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, a decline in acute reperfusion treatments and a delay in DGT was seen, which indicates a target for attention. It also appeared that COVID-19-positive or -suspected patients had more severe neurologic symptoms, whereas their EVT-workflow was not affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Stroke , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
3.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 43(1): 98-101, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581414

ABSTRACT

Reports of a rare form of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with profound thrombocytopenia have emerged following introduction of the adenovirus-vectored coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines. Between March and June 2021, seven cases of refractory vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia were referred to our institution for mechanical thrombectomy. The condition of 1 patient deteriorated during interhospital transfer, and the remaining 6 underwent successful recanalization. No procedure-related adverse events were reported. At the time of this writing, 3 patients have been discharged with a good functional outcome (mRS 0-1), one required rehabilitation for mild dysarthria and vocal cord palsy (mRS 3), and 2 have died due to severe mass effect. Our anecdotal experience suggests that endovascular therapy may be safe and effective in reducing thrombus burden in selected cases of postvaccination cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis , Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/diagnostic imaging , Thrombectomy
4.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e933225, 2021 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534576

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection has been associated with a hypercoagulable state in which patients can be at risk for developing venous and arterial thromboembolic events at a rate as high as 31%. A free-floating aortic thrombus (FFT) is a rare life-threatening complication of a hypercoagulable state. These thrombi require medical, endovascular, or surgical treatment. The optimal treatment modality for FFT occurring in the setting of COVID-19 remains unknown. We present a patient with a COVID-19-associated free-floating descending aortic thrombus that was treated with percutaneous vacuum-assisted thrombectomy (angio-VAC). CASE REPORT A 61-year-old man presented to the hospital with dyspnea and hypoxia and was diagnosed with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Initial chest computed tomography angiography (CTA) did not show pulmonary emboli or thrombi. Inflammatory markers (D-dimer, lactate dehydrogenase, ferritin, fibrinogen) were tracked every other day. After several measurements of decreasing D-dimer values, there was a noticeable increase in D-dimer level and continued dependence on high levels of supplemental oxygen. A repeat chest CTA showed an FFT, confirmed by transesophageal echocardiogram. Cardiothoracic surgery and interventional radiology teams performed successful angio-VAC percutaneous removal, confirmed with intravascular ultrasound. The patient was subsequently discharged with a 3-month supply of apixaban. CONCLUSIONS Minimally invasive endovascular removal of an FFT is a therapeutic option, as anticoagulation alone carries the risk of partial lysis and repeat embolization. Clinicians can consider this endovascular treatment option paired with therapeutic anticoagulation. Further guidelines on monitoring and treatment of possible COVID-19-associated thrombosis are needed, particularly when the risk of embolization is high.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Aorta , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombectomy
5.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(12): 1088-1094, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526521

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The optimal anesthesia management for patients with stroke undergoing mechanical thrombectomy (MT) during the COVID-19 pandemic has become a matter of controversy. Some recent guidelines have favored general anesthesia (GA) in patients perceived as high risk for intraprocedural conversion from sedation to GA, including those with dominant hemispheric occlusions/aphasia or baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score >15. We aim to identify the rate and predictors of conversion to GA during MT in a high-volume center where monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is the default modality. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained MT database from January 2013 to July 2020 was undertaken. Analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of intraprocedural conversion to GA. In addition, we analyzed the GA conversion rates in subgroups of interest. RESULTS: Among 1919 MT patients, 1681 (87.6%) started treatment under MAC (median age 65 years (IQR 55-76); baseline NIHSS 16 (IQR 11-21); 48.4% women). Of the 1677 eligible patients, 26 (1.6%) converted to GA including 1.4% (22/1615) with anterior and 6.5% (4/62) with posterior circulation strokes. The only predictor of GA conversion was posterior circulation stroke (OR 4.99, 95% CI 1.67 to 14.96, P=0.004). The conversion rates were numerically higher in right than in left hemispheric occlusions (1.6% vs 1.2%; OR 1.37, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.19, P=0.47) and in milder than in more severe strokes (NIHSS ≤15 vs >15: 2% vs 1.2%; OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.36, P=0.23). CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed that the overall rate of conversion from MAC to GA during MT was low (1.6%) and, while higher in posterior circulation strokes, it was not predicted by either hemispheric dominance or stroke severity. Caution should be given before changing clinical practice during moments of crisis.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Aged , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome , United States
6.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522933

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulable and proinflammatory states induced by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) lead to thrombotic and embolic events. In this case report, the authors describe how they successfully managed acute critical limb ischaemia in a patient of COVID-19 illness with severe pulmonary disease and high thrombus burden in the infrapopliteal arteries.


Subject(s)
Arterial Occlusive Diseases , COVID-19 , Humans , Ischemia/etiology , Ischemia/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombectomy
7.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(12): 106152, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506161

ABSTRACT

Cerebrovascular diseases attributed to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are uncommon but can result in devastating outcomes. Pediatric acute ischemic strokes are themselves rare and with very few large vessel occlusion related acute ischemic strokes attributed to COVID-19 described in the literature as of date. COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to acute stroke care delays across the world and with pediatric endovascular therapy still in its infancy, it poses a great challenge in facilitating good outcomes in children presenting with acute ischemic strokes in the setting of COVID-19. We present a pediatric patient who underwent endovascular therapy for an internal carotid artery occlusion related acute ischemic stroke in the setting of active COVID-19 and had an excellent outcome thanks to a streamlined stroke pathway involving the vascular neurology, neuro-interventional, neurocritical care, and anesthesiology teams.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Carotid Artery Thrombosis/therapy , Carotid Artery, Internal , Carotid Stenosis/therapy , Endovascular Procedures , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , COVID-19/diagnosis , Carotid Artery Thrombosis/diagnosis , Carotid Artery Thrombosis/etiology , Carotid Artery, Internal/diagnostic imaging , Carotid Stenosis/diagnosis , Carotid Stenosis/etiology , Child , Endovascular Procedures/instrumentation , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Male , Stents , Treatment Outcome
8.
Neurologist ; 26(6): 261-267, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been shown to associate with increased risk of thromboembolic events. Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) has long been used to effectively manage those with large-vessel occlusive (LVO) stroke and has similarly been implemented in the management of stroke in COVID-19 patients. REVIEW SUMMARY: The COVID-19 pandemic took the health care sector by a storm. Thus, less is known about MT outcomes in this population and evidence suggesting poor outcomes postthrombectomy for COVID-19 patients is accumulating. We provide a narrative on some of the published studies on the outcomes of MT in COVID-19 patients with LVO between March 2020 and February 2021. A description of patient characteristics, risk factors, COVID-19 infection severity, stroke features and thrombectomy success in this population is also presented as data from several studies show that LVO in COVID-19 patients may have some distinguishing characteristics that make management more challenging. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of COVID-19 on the long-term prognosis of stroke patients after thrombectomy is yet to be determined. The accumulating evidence from current studies indicates a negative impact of COVID-19 on outcomes in acute ischemic stroke patients who receive MT, irrespective of timely, successful angiographic recanalization. This review may help alert clinicians of some of the COVID-19-specific postthrombectomy challenges.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/complications , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 16(1): 226, 2021 Aug 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463257

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inferior vena cava thrombosis is cited to be a complication of inferior vena cava filter placement and post coronary artery bypass surgery. Often only mild symptoms arise from these thrombi; however, due to the chronic nature of some thrombi and the recanalization process, more serious complications can arise. Although anticoagulation remains the gold standard of treatment, some patients are unable to be anticoagulated. In this case, we present a 65-year-old male who underwent IVC filter placement and open-heart surgery who later developed extensive femoral and iliocaval thrombosis leading to right heart failure, which required thrombus extraction with an AngioVac suction device. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a 65-year-old male who presented with bilateral pulmonary emboli with extensive right lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Upon investigation he had ischemic heart disease and underwent a five-vessel coronary artery bypass for which he had an IVC filter placed preoperatively. On post operative day 3 to 4, he was decompensated and was diagnosed with an IVC thrombus. He progressed to right heart failure and worsening cardiogenic shock despite therapeutic anticoagulation and was taken for a suction thrombectomy using the AngioVac (AngioDynamics, Latham, NY) aspiration thrombectomy device. The thrombectomy was successful and he was able to recover and was discharged from the hospital. CONCLUSION: Despite being a rare complication, IVC thrombosis can have detrimental effects. This case is an example of how IVC thrombus in the post-operative setting can lead to mortality. The gold standard is therapeutic anticoagulation but despite that, this patient continued to have worsening cardiogenic shock. Other therapies have been described but because of its rarity, they are only described in case reports. This case shows that the AngioVac device is a successful treatment option for IVC thrombus and can have the possibility of future use.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Bypass/adverse effects , Shock, Cardiogenic/surgery , Thrombectomy , Vena Cava Filters/adverse effects , Vena Cava, Inferior , Venous Thrombosis/surgery , Aged , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Bypass/methods , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/etiology , Heart Failure/surgery , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock, Cardiogenic/drug therapy , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Thrombectomy/instrumentation , Treatment Outcome , Vena Cava, Inferior/diagnostic imaging , Vena Cava, Inferior/surgery , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
11.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106028, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386120

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic greatly influenced the overall quality of healthcare. The purpose of this study was to compare the time variables for acute stroke treatment and evaluate differences in the pre-hospital and in-hospital care before and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, as well as between the first and second waves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Observational and retrospective study from an Italian hospital, including patients who underwent thrombectomy between January 1st 2019 and December 31st 2020. RESULTS: Out of a total of 594 patients, 301 were treated in 2019 and 293 in 2020. The majority observed in 2019 came from spoke centers (67,1%), while in 2020 more than half (52%, p < 0.01) were evaluated at the hospital's emergency room directly (ER-NCGH). When compared to 2019, time metrics were globally increased in 2020, particularly in the ER-NCGH groups during the period of the first wave (N = 24 and N = 56, respectively): "Onset-to-door":50,5 vs 88,5, p < 0,01; "Arrival in Neuroradiology - groin":13 vs 25, p < 0,01; "Door-to-groin":118 vs 143,5, p = 0,02; "Onset-to-groin":180 vs 244,5, p < 0,01; "Groin-to-recanalization": 41 vs 49,5, p = 0,03. When comparing ER-NCGH groups between the first (N = 56) and second (N = 49) waves, there was an overall improvement in times, namely in the "Door-to-CT" (47,5 vs 37, p < 0,01), "Arrival in Neuroradiology - groin" (25 vs 20, p = 0,03) and "Onset-to-groin" (244,5 vs 227,5, p = 0,02). CONCLUSIONS: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, treatment for stroke patients was delayed, particularly during the first wave. Reallocation of resources and the shutting down of spoke centers may have played a determinant role.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/trends , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Emergency Medical Services/trends , Female , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
12.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 209: 106931, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385293

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The collateral effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on interventional stroke care is not well described. We studied this effect by utilizing stroke device sales data as markers of interventional stroke case volume in the United States. METHODS: Using a real-time healthcare device sales registry, this observational study examined trends in the sales of thrombectomy devices and cerebral aneurysm coiling from the same 945 reporting hospitals in the U.S. between January 22 and June 31, 2020, and for the same months in 2018 and 2019 to allow for comparison. We simultaneously reviewed daily reports of new COVID-19 cases. The strength of association between the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 and procedural device sales was measured using Spearman rank correlation coefficient (CC). RESULTS: Device sales decreased for thrombectomy (- 3.7%) and cerebral aneurysm coiling (- 8.5%) when comparing 2019-2020. In 2020, thrombectomy device sales were negatively associated with the cumulative incidence of COVID-19 (CC - 0.56, p < 0.0001), with stronger negative correlation during April (CC - 0.97, p < 0.0001). The same negative correlation was observed with aneurysm treatment devices (CC - 0.60, p < 0.001), with stronger correlation in April (CC - 0.97, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The decline in sales of stroke interventional equipment underscores a decline in associated case volumes. Future pandemic responses should consider strategies to mitigate such negative collateral effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce/trends , Stroke/epidemiology , Thrombectomy/trends , Vascular Access Devices/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Intracranial Aneurysm/epidemiology , Intracranial Aneurysm/therapy , Pandemics , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/economics , United States/epidemiology , Vascular Access Devices/economics
13.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(11): 106072, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377775

ABSTRACT

Recently cases of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) and thrombosis following the adenoviral vector vaccine against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were reported. A mechanism similar to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia was proposed with antibodies to platelet factor 4 (PF4). Vaccine related arterial thrombosis in the brain is rare but life-threatening and optimal treatment is not established. We report clinical, laboratory, imaging findings and treatment in a 51-year-old female presenting with acute left middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion 7 days after the first dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. Due to low platelet count and suspicion of VITT she was not eligible for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) and proceeded to mechanical thrombectomy (MER) with successful recanalization four hours after onset of symptoms. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and heparin pentasaccharide fondaparinux was initiated. Presence of anti-PF4 antibodies was confirmed. The patient improved clinically with normalization of platelet count. Clinicians should be alert of VITT in patients with acute ischemic stroke after ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccination and low platelet counts. MER showed to be feasible and effective. We propose considering MER in patients with VITT and large vessel occlusion despite thrombocytopenia. High-dose IVIG should be started immediately. Alternative anticoagulation to heparin should be started 24 hours after stroke onset unless significant hemorrhagic transformation occurred. Platelet transfusion is contraindicated and should be considered only in severe hemorrhagic complications. Restenosis or reocclusion of the revascularized artery is possible due to the hypercoagulable state in VITT and angiographic surveillance after the procedure is reasonable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/chemically induced , Ischemic Stroke/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/immunology , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery/therapy , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/immunology , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Middle Aged , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/diagnosis , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/therapy , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome
14.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 42(5): 808-814, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376688

ABSTRACT

Robotic interventional neuroradiology is an emerging field with the potential to enhance patient safety, reduce occupational hazards, and expand systems of care. Endovascular robots allow the operator to precisely control guidewires and catheters from a lead-shielded cockpit located several feet (or potentially hundreds of miles) from the patient. This has opened up the possibility of expanding telestroke networks to patients without access to life-saving procedures such as stroke thrombectomy and cerebral aneurysm occlusion by highly-experienced physicians. The prototype machines, first developed in the early 2000s, have evolved into machines capable of a broad range of techniques, while incorporating newly automated maneuvers and safety algorithms. In recent years, preliminary clinical research has been published demonstrating the safety and feasibility of the technology in cerebral angiography and intracranial intervention. The next step is to conduct larger, multisite, prospective studies to assess generalizability and, ultimately, improve patient outcomes in neurovascular disease.


Subject(s)
Nervous System Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Interventional/methods , Robotics/methods , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/surgery , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/surgery , Telemedicine , Thrombectomy
15.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106051, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: An association has been reported between delays in the onset-to-door (O2D) time for mechanical thrombectomy (MT) and outbreaks of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the association between other MT time courses or functional outcomes and COVID-19 outbreaks remains unclear. We compared the time courses of stroke pathways or functional outcomes in 2020 (the COVID-19 era) with those in 2019 (the pre-COVID-19 era) in Tokyo, Japan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective observational study used data from the Tokyo-tama-REgistry of Acute endovascular Thrombectomy (TREAT), a multicenter registry of MT for acute large vessel occlusion in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. Patients who had undergone acute MT from January 2019 to December 2020 were included. Patients were classified by the year they had undergone MT (2019 or 2020). RESULTS: In total, 477 patients were analyzed. O2D time was significantly longer in 2020 (146.0 min) than in 2019 (105.0 min; p = 0.034). No significant difference in door-to-puncture time (D2P) time or modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score 0-2 at 90 days was seen between 2019 and 2020. In the subgroup analysis, O2D time was significantly longer in the first half of 2020 compared with 2019. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the year 2020 was a independent predictor of longer O2D time, but not for mRS score 0-2 at 90 days. CONCLUSIONS: Although O2D time was significantly longer in the COVID-19 compared with the pre-COVID-19 era, D2P may not be significantly delayed and functional outcomes may not be different, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Tokyo , Treatment Outcome
16.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(2): 185-199, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Posterior circulation stroke is characterized by poor prognosis because its optimal thrombolysis "time window" is always missed. After mechanical thrombectomy (MT), the recanalization rate of posterior circulation obstruction is significantly increased, but prognosis remains poor. To best manage patients, prognostic factors are needed to inform MT triaging after posterior circulation stroke. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done for the period through April 2020. Studies included those with posterior circulation stroke cases that underwent MT. The primary outcome measure in this study was the modified Rankin Scale on day 90. RESULTS: No outcome differences were found in gender, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and coronary artery disease (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.90-1.28; OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.82-1.26; OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 0.94-1.68; and OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.58-1.22, respectively). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and previous stroke correlated with poorer prognosis (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.48-0.77; OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.50-0.73; and OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55-0.99, respectively). However, hyperlipidemia correlated with better prognosis (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.58). CONCLUSION: Our analysis indicates that hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or previous stroke correlate with poorer outcomes. Intriguingly, hyperlipidemia correlates with better prognosis. These factors may help inform triage decisions when considering MT for posterior circulation stroke patients. However, large, multicenter, randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these observations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Thrombectomy/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Recovery of Function , Referral and Consultation/trends , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/mortality , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome
17.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(1): 105-113, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348130

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Many countries worldwide, including Germany, reported that the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020 influenced the care of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, but data are lacking for further pandemic wave periods. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide, retrospective, cross-sectional study of all hospitalized patients with the main diagnosis of AIS in 2019 and 2020. Primary outcomes were the number of hospitalizations for AIS, the application of stroke unit care, intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), and mechanical thrombectomy (MT), as well as the in-hospital mortality during the different pandemic periods in 2020 compared to the corresponding periods in 2019. Secondarily, we analyzed differences in outcomes between patients with and without concurrent COVID-19. RESULTS: We included 429,841 cases with AIS, of which 1268 had concurrent COVID-19. Hospitalizations for AIS declined during both pandemic wave periods in 2020 (first wave: -10.9%, second wave: -4.6%). MT rates were consistently higher throughout 2020 compared to 2019, whereas the IVT rate dropped during the second wave period (16.0% vs. 17.0%, p < 0.001). AIS patients with concurrent COVID-19 frequently received recanalization treatments, with an overall MT rate of 8.4% and IVT rate of 15.9%. The in-hospital mortality was high (22.8% vs. 7.5% in noninfected AIS patients, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate a smaller decline in hospitalizations for AIS in the more severe second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. AIS patients with and without concurrent COVID-19 who did seek acute care continued to receive recanalization treatments in Germany.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Treatment Outcome
18.
Vasc Endovascular Surg ; 55(8): 903-906, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346177

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism from a "thrombotic storm"-like syndrome is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with active or "recovered" COVID-19. Patients should be risk-stratified, optimally by a pulmonary embolism (PE) response team (PERT), and considered for escalation of care if found with intermediate or high-risk PE. We present a series of patients with COVID-19-associated PE and thrombotic storm with D-dimer >10 000 ng/mL who underwent successful mechanical thrombectomy for intermediate to high-risk PE. All patients had immediate improvement in hemodynamics and large amounts of thrombi were retrieved.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Thrombectomy , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/blood , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
20.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 75: 140-143, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340555

ABSTRACT

The incidence of venous and arterial thromboembolic complications in COVID-19 patients is significant. The vast majority of COVID-19 patients spend their quarantine at home in a self-isolation condition. The occurrence of Acute limb ischemia (ALI) is a dangerous event that needs prompt diagnosis and management with time-dependent recanalization outcomes. We present a case series of three COVID-19 patients who suffered from ALI that occurred during home self-isolation, and that were diagnosed and treated with a significant time-delay due to COVID-19 social implications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Delayed Diagnosis , Diagnostic Errors , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnostic imaging , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amputation , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Embolectomy , Humans , Ischemia/etiology , Ischemia/surgery , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/etiology , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , Predictive Value of Tests , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...