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1.
Kardiologiia ; 62(9): 74-78, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2311367

ABSTRACT

This article presents a clinical case of urgent, life-saving surgical intervention in a 69-year-old woman with left atrial myxoma with rapid morphological and clinical progression and a history of COVID-19 and breast cancer in remission. However, the concurrent (perhaps secondary) thrombophilic condition facilitated the complication development in the form of superior vena caval orifice thrombosis in the early postoperative period. For this complication, repeated surgery in the volume of thrombectomy was performed, which resulted in stabilization of the patient's condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Neoplasms , Myxoma , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Female , Heart Atria/diagnostic imaging , Heart Atria/pathology , Heart Neoplasms/complications , Heart Neoplasms/diagnosis , Heart Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Myxoma/complications , Myxoma/diagnosis , Myxoma/surgery , Thrombectomy/methods , Vena Cava, Superior/pathology
2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 32(6): 107138, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302577

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic public health restrictions on our drip and ship mechanical thrombectomy program in Santiago Chile. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database comparing two cohorts, one during a two-year period before COVID-19 and the second during the two years of the pandemic at our metropolitan stroke program. RESULTS: A total of 100 patients were included in the pre COVID-19 cohort (cohort 1) and 121 in the COVID-19 cohort (cohort 2). There was a significant difference between cohorts, with older patients, different occlusion sites and higher door to arterial puncture time during the COVID-19 period. A non-significant trend for worse 90-day outcomes and higher mortality was present in cohort 2. There were no statistical differences in safety treatment parameters. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 pandemic has had a measurable impact on our mechanical thrombectomy program. Results showed similarities to other reported Latin American series, where less robust health systems could adapt less efficiently compared to developed countries. After two years of public health restrictions, there were changes in the treatment population characteristics, delay in some internal management metrics and a non-significant trend to worse 90-day outcomes and higher mortality.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Humans , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Public Health , Treatment Outcome , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , Stroke/epidemiology
3.
Eur J Neurol ; 30(4): 943-950, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280371

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic many countries reported a decline in stroke volumes. The aim of this study was to analyze if the decline was related to the intensity of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The first pandemic year (1 March 2020 to 28 February 2021) overall and during the three COVID-19 waves were compared with the preceding year. Volumes of acute ischaemic stroke (AIS), subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage and recanalization treatments (intravenous thrombolysis [IVT] and mechanical thrombectomy [MT]) were obtained from the National Register of Reimbursed Health Services. Door-to-needle time, onset-to-door time and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at admission were obtained from the Registry of Stroke Care Quality. RESULTS: During the pandemic year compared to the preceding year there were 26,453 versus 28,771 stroke admissions, representing an 8.8% decline (p < 0.001). The declines (-10%, -11%, -19%) appeared in COVID-19 waves (spring 2020, autumn 2020, winter 2021) except for an increase (2%) during summer 2020. Admissions for AIS declined by 10.2% (p < 0.001), whilst hemorrhagic stroke volumes were minimally decreased. The absolute volumes of IVT and MT decreased by 9.4% (p < 0.001) and 5.7% (p = 0.16), respectively. However, the proportions of ischaemic stroke patients receiving IVT (18% vs. 18%; p = 0.72) and MT (6% vs. 6%; p = 0.28) remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: There was a decline in stroke admissions, but such decline was not related to COVID-19 incidence. The frequency of use of recanalization procedures (IVT, MT) and times (onset-to-door time, door-to-needle time) in AIS were preserved in the Czech Republic during the first year of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Humans , Stroke/therapy , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Thrombectomy/methods , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome , Hospitalization
4.
N Engl J Med ; 388(14): 1272-1283, 2023 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263629

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The role of endovascular therapy for acute stroke with a large infarction has not been extensively studied in differing populations. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized trial in China involving patients with acute large-vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation and an Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score of 3 to 5 (range, 0 to 10, with lower values indicating larger infarction) or an infarct-core volume of 70 to 100 ml. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio within 24 hours from the time they were last known to be well to undergo endovascular therapy and receive medical management or to receive medical management alone. The primary outcome was the score on the modified Rankin scale at 90 days (scores range from 0 to 6, with higher scores indicating greater disability), and the primary objective was to determine whether a shift in the distribution of the scores on the modified Rankin scale at 90 days had occurred between the two groups. Secondary outcomes included scores of 0 to 2 and 0 to 3 on the modified Rankin scale. The primary safety outcome was symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage within 48 hours after randomization. RESULTS: A total of 456 patients were enrolled; 231 were assigned to the endovascular-therapy group and 225 to the medical-management group. Approximately 28% of the patients in both groups received intravenous thrombolysis. The trial was stopped early owing to the efficacy of endovascular therapy after the second interim analysis. At 90 days, a shift in the distribution of scores on the modified Rankin scale toward better outcomes was observed in favor of endovascular therapy over medical management alone (generalized odds ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.69; P = 0.004). Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 14 of 230 patients (6.1%) in the endovascular-therapy group and in 6 of 225 patients (2.7%) in the medical-management group; any intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 113 (49.1%) and 39 (17.3%), respectively. Results for the secondary outcomes generally supported those of the primary analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In a trial conducted in China, patients with large cerebral infarctions had better outcomes with endovascular therapy administered within 24 hours than with medical management alone but had more intracranial hemorrhages. (Funded by Covidien Healthcare International Trading [Shanghai] and others; ANGEL-ASPECT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04551664.).


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , Cerebral Infarction , Endovascular Procedures , Ischemic Stroke , Thrombectomy , Humans , Brain Ischemia/drug therapy , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Cerebral Infarction/drug therapy , Cerebral Infarction/surgery , China , Endovascular Procedures/adverse effects , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Fibrinolytic Agents/adverse effects , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Intracranial Hemorrhages/chemically induced , Intracranial Hemorrhages/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/drug therapy , Ischemic Stroke/surgery , Prospective Studies , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
5.
BMC Neurol ; 23(1): 72, 2023 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2247825

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The corononavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in modifications in the workflow and redistribution of human resources, causing challenges in setting up of an acute stroke service. We would like to share our preliminary outcome amid this pandemic, to determine if the implementation of COVID-19 standard operating procedures (SOPs) affected the delivery of our hyperacute stroke service. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed one-year data from our stroke registry that began with the establishment of our hyperacute stroke service at Universiti Putra Malaysia Teaching Hospital from April 2020 until May 2021. RESULTS: Setting up acute stroke services during the pandemic with constrained manpower and implementation of COVID-19 SOPs, was challenging. There was a significant dip of stroke admission from April to June 2020 due to the Movement Control Order (MCO) implemented by the government to curb the spread of COVID-19. However, the numbers of stroke admission steadily rose approaching 2021, after the implementation of recovery MCO. We managed to treat 75 patients with hyperacute stroke interventions i.e. intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), mechanical thrombectomy (MT) or both. Despite implementing COVID-19 SOPs and using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as our first line acute stroke imaging modality, clinical outcomes in our cohort were encouraging; almost 40% of patients who underwent hyperacute stroke treatment had early neurological recovery (ENR), and only 33% of patients had early neurological stability (ENS). In addition, we were able to maintain our door-to-imaging (DTI) and door-to-needle (DTN) time in line with international recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: Our data reflects that COVID-19 SOPs did not deter successful delivery of hyperacute stroke services in our center. However, bigger and multi center studies are required to support our findings.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Treatment Outcome , Thrombectomy/methods , Brain Ischemia/therapy
6.
Eur Neurol ; 85(5): 349-366, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973983

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Despite progress made over the last 30 years, stroke is still a leading cause of disability and mortality; likewise, its burden is expected to increase over the next decades, due to population growth and aging. The development of drugs with better safety-efficacy profiles as well as strategies able to improve ischemic stroke management from the pre-hospital setting is needed. SUMMARY: The pathophysiology of ischemic stroke involves multiple pathways resulting in cerebral artery obstruction and brain tissue ischemia. To date, the only approved drug for acute ischemic stroke is intravenous thrombolytic alteplase. Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) can be administered alone or in combination with endovascular treatment (EVT) with mechanical thrombectomy, in case of large vessel occlusion and generally within 6 h from symptoms onset. The risk of potential bleeding complications, especially symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, is one of the reasons for the reluctance to administer IVT. Tenecteplase is a promising alternative fibrinolytic agent, having a better safety profile than alteplase. Moreover, recent evidences have allowed an extension of the IVT ± EVT time window for patients with unknown onset time and for those with a known onset time thanks to the new "tissue-window" approach guided by advanced neuroimaging techniques, which also helps in collateral circulation estimation. Regarding primary-secondary prevention, researchers are focused on improving the efficacy of antithrombotic drugs with a "hemostasis-sparing" approach. Neuroprotective agents are also under development, particularly stem cells. The COVID-19 pandemic has critically stressed global healthcare systems, with collateral damage resulting in access delivery of only emergency care, such as ischemic stroke. Regarding telemedicine, it has had a minor role in acute stroke management, and with the onset of COVID-19, this role will most likely be adopted to increase access and delivery in stroke assessment, but also in the follow-up.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Ischemic Stroke , Neuroprotective Agents , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/drug therapy , Tenecteplase/therapeutic use , Thrombectomy/methods , Thrombolytic Therapy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
7.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(11): 3273-3287, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1927584

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous studies suggest that mechanisms and outcomes in patients with COVID-19-associated stroke differ from those in patients with non-COVID-19-associated strokes, but there is limited comparative evidence focusing on these populations. The aim of this study, therefore, was to determine if a significant association exists between COVID-19 status with revascularization and functional outcomes following thrombectomy for large vessel occlusion (LVO), after adjustment for potential confounding factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional, international multicenter retrospective study was conducted in consecutively admitted COVID-19 patients with concomitant acute LVO, compared to a control group without COVID-19. Data collected included age, gender, comorbidities, clinical characteristics, details of the involved vessels, procedural technique, and various outcomes. A multivariable-adjusted analysis was conducted. RESULTS: In this cohort of 697 patients with acute LVO, 302 had COVID-19 while 395 patients did not. There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) in the mean age (in years) and gender of patients, with younger patients and more males in the COVID-19 group. In terms of favorable revascularization (modified Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction [mTICI] grade 3), COVID-19 was associated with lower odds of complete revascularization (odds ratio 0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23-0.48; p < 0.001), which persisted on multivariable modeling with adjustment for other predictors (adjusted odds ratio 0.30, 95% CI 0.12-0.77; p = 0.012). Moreover, endovascular complications, in-hospital mortality, and length of hospital stay were significantly higher among COVID-19 patients (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 was an independent predictor of incomplete revascularization and poor functional outcome in patients with stroke due to LVO. Furthermore, COVID-19 patients with LVO were more often younger and had higher morbidity/mortality rates.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Stroke , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
8.
Neurol Neurochir Pol ; 56(2): 163-170, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753880

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical profiles and outcomes of patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection and acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) treated with mechanical thrombectomy (MT) at the Comprehensive Stroke Centre (CSC) of the University Hospital in Krakow. CLINICAL RATIONALE FOR THE STUDY: COVID-19 is a risk factor for AIS and worsens prognosis in patients with large artery occlusions. During the pandemic, the global number of MT has dropped. At the same time, studies assessing outcomes of this treatment in COVID-19-associated AIS have produced divergent results. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this single-centre study, we retrospectively analysed and compared the clinical profiles (age, sex, presence of cardiovascular risk factors, neurological deficit at admission), stroke size (measured using postprocessing analysis of perfusion CT with RAPID software), time from stroke onset to arrival at the CSC, time from arrival at the CSC to groin puncture, treatment with intravenous thrombolysis, length of hospitalisation, laboratory test results, and short-term outcomes (measured with Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction scale, modified Rankin Scale and National Health Institute Stroke Scale) in patients with AIS treated with MT during the pandemic. A comparison between patients with and without concomitant SARS-CoV2 infection was then performed. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between 15 COVID (+) and 167 COVID (-) AIS patients treated with AIS with respect to clinical profiles (p > 0.05), stroke size (p > 0.05) or outcomes (NIHSS at discharge, 8.1 (SD = 7.1) vs. 8.8 (SD = 9.6), p = 0.778, mRS at discharge 2.9 (SD = 2) vs. 3.1 (SD = 2.1), p = 0.817, death rate 6.7% vs. 12.6%, p = 0.699). There was a significant difference between patients with and without COVID-19 concerning time from arrival at the CSC to groin puncture [104.27 (SD = 51.47) vs. 97.63 (SD = 156.94) min., p = 0.044] and the length of hospitalisation [23.7 (SD = 11.9) vs. 10.5 (SD = 6.9) days, p < 0.001]. CONCLUSION: In AIS patients treated with MT, concomitant SARS-CoV2 infection did not affect the outcome. Our observations need to be confirmed in larger, and preferably multicentre, studies.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/surgery , RNA, Viral/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
9.
Am J Case Rep ; 23: e935355, 2022 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706092

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Vaccine-related thrombosis and thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) is a rare life-threatening syndrome reported after vaccination against COVID-19. CASE REPORT We describe a case of 56-year-old postmenopausal, obese woman with hypothyroidism and hyperlipidemia, who presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with fluctuating mental status and left-side weakness for 5 days. She received her first and second dose of mRNA-1273 vaccine (Moderna) at 12 and 8 weeks, respectively, prior to presentation. She was found to have multiple hemorrhages and infarcts on a computed tomography (CT) scan of the head. She was intubated in the ED for airway protection and mechanically ventilated. Magnetic resonance angiogram and venogram showed multiple infarcts in right frontal, parietal, and left parietal lobes, along with occlusion of left-side transverse sinus, sagittal sinuses, and left internal jugular vein, suggesting cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). Despite anticoagulation, her clinical condition continued to worsen, and she was referred for emergent endovascular thrombectomy. Her clinical condition improved after thrombectomy, and she was discharged on warfarin. At 4-month follow-up, she was able to walk with an assistive device and able to carry out activities of daily living with assistance. She is planned for further work-up for hypercoagulable state at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS This case highlights the occurrence of vaccine-related thrombosis 3 months after vaccine administration. Only 2 cases of TTS have been reported so far after mRNA-1273 vaccination (Moderna). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of CVST presenting 3 months after the first dose of COVID-19 mRNA-1273 vaccine (Moderna).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/complications , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/etiology , Thrombectomy/methods
10.
J Atheroscler Thromb ; 29(7): 1095-1107, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352901

ABSTRACT

AIM: We evaluated the delay in stroke reperfusion therapy between the pre-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) period and the with-COVID-19 period, and compared this delay between each phase of the with-COVID-19 period. METHODS: Patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) undergoing intravenous thrombolysis and/or mechanical thrombectomy were selected from our single-center prospective registry. The time to perform reperfusion therapy were compared between patients admitted from March 2019 to February 2020 (pre-COVID-19 group) and those from March 2020 to February 2021 (with-COVID-19 group). Patients in the with-COVID-19 group were further divided into three 4-month-long subgroups (first-phase: March to June 2020; second-phase: July to October 2020; third-phase: November 2020 to February 2021), and the time delay of reperfusion therapy were compared between these subgroups. RESULTS: Of 1,260 patients with AIS hospitalized in the study period, 265 patients were examined. Compared with the pre-COVID-19 group (133 patients; median age, 79 years), the with-COVID-19 group (132 patients; median age, 79 years) had a longer median door-to-imaging time (25 min vs. 27 min, P=0.04), and a longer door-to-groin puncture time (65 min vs. 72 min, P=0.02). In the three 4-month-long subgroups, the median door-to-needle time (49 min, 43 min, and 38 min, respectively; P=0.04) and door-to-groin puncture time (83 min, 70 min, and 61 min, P<0.01, respectively) decreased significantly during the with-COVID-19 period. CONCLUSIONS: The delay in reperfusion therapy increased during the with-COVID-19 period compared with the pre-COVID-19 period. However, the door-to-needle time and door-to-groin puncture time decreased as time elapsed during the with-COVID-19 period. CLINICALTRIALS: gov Identifier: NCT02251665.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Aged , Humans , Reperfusion , Stroke/drug therapy , Thrombectomy/methods , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Workflow
11.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(2): 551-555, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279005

ABSTRACT

Although novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) primarily affects the respiratory system, it can affect multiple organ systems, leading to serious complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ failure. Nearly 20 to 55% of patients with COVID-19 experience coagulation disorders that cause high mortality in line with the severity of the clinical picture. Thromboembolism can be observed in both venous and arterial systems. The vast majority of thromboembolic events are associated with the venous system and are often observed as pulmonary embolism. Arterial thromboembolisms often involve the arteries in the lower extremities, followed by those in the upper extremities. Herein, we report a rare case of COVID-19 pneumonia whose left arm was amputated at the forearm level after arterial thromboembolism in the left upper extremity. This case report is valuable, as it is the first reported case of upper extremity arterial thromboembolism in Turkey, as well as the only case in the literature in which the patient underwent four surgical interventions and is still alive.


Subject(s)
Amputation, Surgical/methods , Brachial Artery , COVID-19 , Reoperation/methods , Thrombectomy , Thromboembolism , Upper Extremity , Aged , Brachial Artery/diagnostic imaging , Brachial Artery/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Humans , Male , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/methods , Thromboembolism/complications , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Thromboembolism/etiology , Treatment Outcome , Upper Extremity/blood supply , Upper Extremity/pathology , Upper Extremity/surgery
13.
Interv Neuroradiol ; 28(1): 58-64, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232409

ABSTRACT

AIM: The epidemic of COVID-19 has greatly affect the world health care system, particular measures have been taken not only to provide safety for health care providers but also to maintain the treatment quality. We evaluate the effect of COVID-19 epidemic to acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients with large vessel occlusion (LVO) received endovascular treatment (EVT) in our institution. METHODS: AIS patients with LVO who underwent EVT in the period of January 1st to April 30th between 2015 and 2020 from our stroke center. The baseline characteristics, working flow time, safety and efficacy outcome and the hospitalization status were retrospectively reviewed, compared and analyzed. RESULTS: There is significant decline in the number of AIS patients with LVO treated compared with the previous year (36 Vs 72 patients) during the epidemic period. The door to puncture time was significantly prolong (225 minutes versus 115 minutes) as well as the length of hospital stay with increase of the hospitalization costs (P < 0.05 for all). There is no significant difference on the safety and efficacy outcome, such recanalization rate, incidence of intracranial hemorrhage, functional independence and mortality during the epidemic (P > 0.05 for all). CONCLUSIONS: Prolongation of the working time flow during the COVID-19 epidemic did not influence the safety and efficacy of EVT in AIS patients with LVO. However, special policy and particular measures in this circumstances is still need to evolve to improve the treatment quality.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/surgery , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e217498, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196364

ABSTRACT

Importance: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is a known neurological complication in patients with respiratory symptoms of COVID-19 infection. However, AIS has not been described as a late sequelae in patients without respiratory symptoms of COVID-19. Objective: To assess AIS experienced by adults 50 years or younger in the convalescent phase of asymptomatic COVID-19 infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This case series prospectively identified consecutive male patients who received care for AIS from public health hospitals in Singapore between May 21, 2020, and October 14, 2020. All of these patients had laboratory-confirmed asymptomatic COVID-19 infection based on a positive SARS-CoV-2 serological (antibodies) test result. These patients were individuals from South Asian countries (India and Bangladesh) who were working in Singapore and living in dormitories. The total number of COVID-19 cases (54 485) in the worker dormitory population was the population at risk. Patients with ongoing respiratory symptoms or positive SARS-CoV-2 serological test results confirmed through reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction nasopharyngeal swabs were excluded. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinical course, imaging, and laboratory findings were retrieved from the electronic medical records of each participating hospital. The incidence rate of AIS in the case series was compared with that of a historical age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched national cohort. Results: A total of 18 male patients, with a median (range) age of 41 (35-50) years and South Asian ethnicity, were included. The median (range) time from a positive serological test result to AIS was 54.5 (0-130) days. The median (range) National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 5 (1-25). Ten patients (56%) presented with a large vessel occlusion, of whom 6 patients underwent intravenous thrombolysis and/or endovascular therapy. Only 3 patients (17%) had a possible cardiac source of embolus. The estimated annual incidence rate of AIS was 82.6 cases per 100 000 people in this study compared with 38.2 cases per 100 000 people in the historical age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched cohort (rate ratio, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.36-3.48; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This case series suggests that the risk for AIS is higher in adults 50 years or younger during the convalescent period of a COVID-19 infection without respiratory symptoms. Acute ischemic stroke could be part of the next wave of complications of COVID-19, and stroke units should be on alert and use serological testing, especially in younger patients or in the absence of traditional risk factors.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombectomy/methods , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Convalescence , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Humans , Incidence , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/ethnology , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Singapore/epidemiology , Transients and Migrants/statistics & numerical data
15.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150217

ABSTRACT

A 34-year-old man presented with central chest pain heralded by bilateral arm numbness, tingling and pain soon after donation of 1000 mL of COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CP). ECG showed ST-elevation in lateral leads and coronary angiogram showed large thrombus in diagonal branch of the left anterior descending artery. The patient underwent successful thrombus aspiration and percutaneous coronary intervention of diagonal branch. In this report, we describe a case of coronary thrombosis leading to ST-elevation myocardial infarction in a naïve plasma donor after donation of COVID-19 CP.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , COVID-19/therapy , Coronary Thrombosis/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/blood , Coronary Angiography/methods , Coronary Thrombosis/diagnosis , Coronary Thrombosis/therapy , Electrocardiography/methods , Humans , Immunization, Passive/adverse effects , Male , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Plasma , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome , COVID-19 Serotherapy
18.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(4): 304-307, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has affected stroke care globally. In this study, we aim to evaluate the impact of the current pandemic on racial disparities among stroke patients receiving mechanical thrombectomy (MT). METHODS: We used the prospectively collected data in the Stroke Thrombectomy and Aneurysm Registry from 12 thrombectomy-capable stroke centers in the US and Europe. We included acute stroke patients who underwent MT between January 2017 and May 2020. We compared baseline features, vascular risk factors, location of occlusion, procedural metrics, complications, and discharge outcomes between patients presenting before (before February 2020) and those who presented during the pandemic (February to May 2020). RESULTS: We identified 2083 stroke patients: of those 235 (11.3%) underwent MT during the COVID-19 pandemic. Compared with pre-pandemic, stroke patients who received MT during the pandemic had longer procedure duration (44 vs 38 min, P=0.006), longer length of hospitalization (6 vs 4 days, P<0.001), and higher in-hospital mortality (18.7% vs 11%, P<0.001). Importantly, there was a lower number of African American patients undergoing MT during the COVID-19 pandemic (609 (32.9%) vs 56 (23.8%); P=0.004). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the care process for stroke patients receiving MT globally. There is a significant decline in the number of African American patients receiving MT, which mandates further investigation.


Subject(s)
Black or African American/ethnology , COVID-19/ethnology , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Pandemics , Stroke/ethnology , Thrombectomy/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Internationality , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Registries , Risk Factors , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome
19.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(1): 20-25, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992113

ABSTRACT

This commentary will focus on the role of thrombectomy for the treatment of embolic stroke during the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). We will begin with review of recently promulgated guidelines for use of thrombectomy in COVID-19-associated stroke. We will then survey the reported experience of thrombectomy applied to treatment of large-vessel occlusion (LVO) stroke in COVID-19. We will conclude by discussing unusual challenges confronted by neuro-interventionalists seeking to perform thrombectomy in COVID-19 patients with acute LVO stroke.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Embolic Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/methods , Adult , Aged , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Embolic Stroke/blood , Embolic Stroke/diagnosis , Embolic Stroke/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
20.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(2): 178-184, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975760

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We examined the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on our regional stroke thrombectomy service in the UK. METHODS: This was a single-center health service evaluation. We began testing for COVID-19 on 3 March and introduced a modified "COVID Stroke Thrombectomy Pathway" on 18 March. We analyzed the clinical, procedural and outcome data for 61 consecutive stroke thrombectomy patients between 1 January and 30 April. We compared the data for January and February ("pre-COVID," n = 33) versus March and April ("during COVID," n = 28). RESULTS: Patient demographics were similar between the 2 groups (mean age 71 ± 12.8 years, 39% female). During the COVID-19 pandemic, (a) total stroke admissions fell by 17% but the thrombectomy rate was maintained at 20% of ischemic strokes; (b) successful recanalization rate was maintained at 81%; (c) early neurological outcomes (neurological improvement following thrombectomy and inpatient mortality) were not significantly different; (d) use of general anesthesia fell significantly from 85 to 32% as intended; and (e) time intervals from onset to arrival, groin puncture, and recanalization were not significantly different, whereas internal delays for external referrals significantly improved for door-to-groin puncture (48 [interquartile range (IQR) 39-57] vs. 33 [IQR 27-44] minutes, p = 0.013) and door-to-recanalization (82.5 [IQR 61-110] vs. 60 [IQR 55-70] minutes, p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on the stroke admission numbers but not stroke thrombectomy rate, successful recanalization rate, or early neurological outcome. Internal delays actually improved during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further studies should examine the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on longer term outcome.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/surgery , COVID-19/complications , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , COVID-19/surgery , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/mortality , Thrombectomy/methods , Time-to-Treatment , United Kingdom
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