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2.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262600, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622369

ABSTRACT

In patients with severe forms of COVID-19, thromboelastometry has been reported to display a hypercoagulant pattern. However, an algorithm to differentiate severe COVID-19 patients from nonsevere patients and healthy controls based on thromboelastometry parameters has not been developed. Forty-one patients over 18 years of age with positive qRT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 were classified according to the severity of the disease: nonsevere (NS, n = 20) or severe (S, n = 21). A healthy control (HC, n = 9) group was also examined. Blood samples from all participants were tested by extrinsic (EXTEM), intrinsic (INTEM), non-activated (NATEM) and functional assessment of fibrinogen (FIBTEM) assays of thromboelastometry. The thrombodynamic potential index (TPI) was also calculated. Severe COVID-19 patients exhibited a thromboelastometry profile with clear hypercoagulability, which was significantly different from the NS and HC groups. Nonsevere COVID-19 cases showed a trend to thrombotic pole. The NATEM test suggested that nonsevere and severe COVID-19 patients presented endogenous coagulation activation (reduced clotting time and clot formation time). TPI data were significantly different between the NS and S groups. The maximum clot firmness profile obtained by FIBTEM showed moderate/elevated accuracy to differentiate severe patients from NS and HC. A decision tree algorithm based on the FIBTEM-MCF profile was proposed to differentiate S from HC and NS. Thromboelastometric parameters are a useful tool to differentiate the coagulation profile of nonsevere and severe COVID-19 patients for therapeutic intervention purposes.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/blood , Adult , Aged , Algorithms , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Thrombophilia/etiology , Young Adult
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 779453, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566650

ABSTRACT

Introduction of vaccines against COVID-19 has provided the most promising chance to control the world-wide COVID-19 pandemic. However, the adenovirus-vector based Oxford/AstraZeneca [ChAdOx1] (AZ) and Johnson & Johnson [Ad26.CoV2.S] COVID-19 vaccines have been linked with serious thromboembolic events combined with thrombocytopenia, denominated Vaccine-induced Immune Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis (VITT). The pathogenesis of COVID-19 VITT remain incompletely understood; especially the initial events that trigger platelet activation, platelet factor (PF)4 release, complex formation and PF4 antibody production are puzzling. This is a prospective study investigating the impact of different COVID-19 vaccines on inflammation (CRP, TNF-α, IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10), vascular endothelial activation (syndecan-1, thrombomodulin, E-selectin, ICAM-1, ICAM-3, VCAM-1), platelet activation (P-selectin, TGF-ß, sCD40L) and aggregation (Multiplate® impedance aggregometry), whole blood coagulation (ROTEM®), thrombin generation and PF4 antibodies to reveal potential differences between AZ and mRNA vaccines in individuals without VITT. The study included 80 (55 AZ and 55 mRNA) vaccinated individuals and 55 non-vaccinated age- and gender matched healthy controls. The main findings where that both vaccines enhanced inflammation and platelet activation, though AZ vaccination induced a more pronounced increase in several inflammatory and platelet activation markers compared to mRNA vaccination and that post-vaccination thrombin generation was higher following AZ vaccination compared to mRNA vaccination. No difference in neither the PF4 antibody level nor the proportion of individuals with positive PF4 antibodies were observed between the vaccine groups. This is the first study to report enhanced inflammation, platelet activation and thrombin generation following AZ vaccination compared to mRNA vaccination in a head-to-head comparison. We speculate that specific components of the AZ adenovirus vector may serve as initial trigger(s) of (hyper)inflammation, platelet activation and thrombin generation, potentially lowering the threshold for a cascade of events that both trigger complications related to excessive inflammation, platelet and coagulation activation as observed in epidemiological studies and promote development of VITT when combined with high-titer functionally active PF4 antibodies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Inflammation/blood , Platelet Activation , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Blood Coagulation , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Thrombelastography , Thrombin/metabolism , Thrombocytopenia , Thrombosis
4.
Adv Med Sci ; 67(1): 39-44, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562003

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a systemic inflammatory condition associated with coagulopathy which may result in severe thromboembolic complications. Cardiac injury is not uncommon in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and therefore we aimed to investigate whether it stems from an abnormal coagulative state. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study on consecutive patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. Traditional coagulation and whole blood rotational thromboelastometry tests were compared between patients with and without cardiac injury. Cardiac injury was defined by increased levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI). RESULTS: The study population consisted of 104 patients (67% males, median age 65 years), of whom 40 (38%) developed cardiac injury. No clinical differences in the traditional coagulation parameters were observed between patients with and without cardiac injury. Thromboelastometry analysis revealed abnormal maximum clot firmness (MCF) levels in FIBTEM assay in 80 (77%) patients. No significant differences in MCF values (p â€‹= â€‹0.450) and percentage of abnormal MCF (p â€‹= â€‹0.290) were detected between patients with and without cardiac injury. Cardiac injury - not hypercoagulability - was associated with mortality (p â€‹= â€‹0.016). CONCLUSIONS: No differences in traditional coagulation and rotational thromboelastometry parameters were found among hospitalized COVID-19 patients with and without cardiac injury. Other mechanisms besides hypercoagulability may be a main culprit for cardiac injury in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombelastography
5.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(8): 544-549, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526211

ABSTRACT

Standard biomarkers have been widely used for COVID-19 diagnosis and prognosis. We hypothesize that thrombogenicity metrics measured by thromboelastography will provide better diagnostic and prognostic utility versus standard biomarkers in COVID-19 positive patients. In this observational prospective study, we included 119 hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients and 15 COVID-19 negative patients. On admission, we measured standard biomarkers and thrombogenicity using a novel thromboelastography assay (TEG-6s). In-hospital all-cause death and thrombotic occurrences (thromboembolism, myocardial infarction and stroke) were recorded. Most COVID-19 patients were African--Americans (68%). COVID-19 patients versus COVID-19 negative patients had higher platelet-fibrin clot strength (P-FCS), fibrin clot strength (FCS) and functional fibrinogen level (FLEV) (P ≤ 0.003 for all). The presence of high TEG-6 s metrics better discriminated COVID-19 positive from negative patients. COVID-19 positive patients with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score at least 3 had higher P-FCS, FCS and FLEV than patients with scores less than 3 (P ≤ 0.001 for all comparisons). By multivariate analysis, the in-hospital composite endpoint occurrence of death and thrombotic events was independently associated with SOFA score more than 3 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, P = 0.03], diabetes (OR = 3.3, P = 0.02) and FCS > 40 mm (OR = 3.4, P = 0.02). This largest observational study suggested the early diagnostic and prognostic utility of thromboelastography to identify COVID-19 and should be considered hypothesis generating. Our results also support the recent FDA guidance regarding the importance of measurement of whole blood viscoelastic properties in COVID-19 patients. Our findings are consistent with the observation of higher hospitalization rates and poorer outcomes for African--Americans with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Early Diagnosis , Female , Fibrin/analysis , Fibrin Clot Lysis Time , Fibrinogen/analysis , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperlipidemias/epidemiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Treatment Outcome , /statistics & numerical data
6.
J Clin Anesth ; 75: 110484, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1514199

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the normal values for non-activated thromboelastometry parameters among pregnant women. DESIGN: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: Tertiary care hospital. PATIENTS: Non-laboring women at term gestation without history of bleeding or clotting disorder or anticoagulation use. INTERVENTIONS: Venous blood samples were collected and ROTEM® was performed using NATEM and NaHEPTEM assays. MEASUREMENTS: Reference ranges were derived by calculating 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles for the following parameters: clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), amplitude at 10 (A10) and 20 min (A20), alpha angle, maximum clot firmness (MCF), and lysis index at 30 (LI30) and 60 min (LI60). The NATEM/NaHEPTEM CT ratio was calculated to determine the baseline ratio in term pregnant women. MAIN RESULTS: 146 women were screened and 120 were enrolled. The median age was 34 years [31-36], median gestational age was 39.1 weeks [38.3-39.3], and median parity was 1 [0-2]. Median pre-delivery platelet and hematocrit levels were within the normal ranges. The reference ranges for NATEM parameters were: CT (232-759 (s)), CFT (69-243 (s)), alpha angle (50-77 (°)), A10 (44-69 (mm)), A20 (54-75 (mm)), MCF (57-77 (mm)), LI30 (100-100 (%)), LI60 (90-100 (%)). The reference ranges for NaHEPTEM parameters were: CT (224-717 (s)), CFT (66-210 (s)), alpha angle (53-77 (°)), A10 (44-67 (mm)), A20 (55-73 (mm)), MCF (58-74 (mm)), LI30 (99-100 (%)), LI60 (90-100 (%)). The NATEM to NaHEPTEM CT ratio reference range was 0.73-1.3. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to our knowledge to report reference ranges for non-activated ROTEM® tests with and without heparinase in non-laboring term pregnant women. These reference ranges may serve as a baseline comparison and may be useful for future research on anticoagulation management in pregnancy.


Subject(s)
Pregnant Women , Thrombelastography , Adult , Blood Coagulation Tests , Female , Heparin Lyase , Humans , Infant , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies
7.
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther ; 53(4): 336-342, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512938

ABSTRACT

In critically ill patients with COVID-19, concomitant abnormalities of coagulation have been seen with an unusually high incidence, often despite seemingly appropriate prophylactic anti-coagulation. It appears that standard coagulation tests are limited in their ability to accurately reflect the severity of the prothrombotic phenotype observed in severe COVID-19 infections. In this narrative review we consider the role of a global haemostatic assay, rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), as a near bedside test allowing a more comprehensive assessment of haemostatic function in the context of COVID-19 infection. A comprehensive literature search was conducted on PubMed using the keywords "COVID-19" OR "SARS-CoV-2" AND "Rotational thromboelastometry". Sixteen original articles were included for analysis and two existing literature reviews were considered. Whilst not the perfect substitute for in vivo coagulation, studies utilising rotational thromboelastometry assays in COVID-19 patients have demonstrated increased maximum clot firmness (consistent with hypercoagulability) and reduced maximum lysis (consistent with "fibrinolytic shutdown"). There is a possible association with disease severity and degree of hypercoagulability and hypofibrinolysis as a possible tool for risk stratification and the potential modulation of fibrinogen-dependent maximum clot firmness with enhanced anticoagulation strategies. Precisely how these coagulation abnormalities can be modified by optimum, individualised medical interventions to improve clinical outcomes, however, remains unclear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombelastography , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Semin Thromb Hemost ; 48(1): 31-54, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493298

ABSTRACT

Patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the infectious pathology caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, have a high risk of thrombosis, though the precise mechanisms behind this remain unclarified. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE identified 18 prospective studies applying dynamic coagulation assays in ICU COVID-19 patients. Overall, these studies revealed normal or slightly reduced primary hemostasis, prolonged clot initiation, but increased clot firmness. Thrombin generation assay parameters generally were equivalent to the control groups or within reference range. Fibrinolysis assays showed increased clot resistance. Only six studies related their findings to clinical outcome. We also prospectively included 51 COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. Blood samples were examined on day 1, 3-4, and 7-8 with platelet function tests, rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM), in vivo and ex vivo thrombin generation, and clot lysis assay. Data on thrombosis, bleeding, and mortality were recorded during 30 days. Primary hemostasis was comparable to healthy controls, but COVID-19 patients had longer ROTEM-clotting times and higher maximum clot firmness than healthy controls. Ex vivo thrombin generation was similar to that of healthy controls while in vivo thrombin generation markers, thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complex, and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) were higher in ICU COVID-19 patients than in healthy controls. Impaired fibrinolysis was present at all time points. TAT complex and F1 + 2 levels were significantly higher in patients developing thrombosis (n = 16) than in those without. In conclusion, only few previous studies employed dynamic hemostasis assays in COVID-19 ICU-patients and failed to reveal a clear association with development of thrombosis. In ICU COVID-19 patients, we confirmed normal platelet aggregation, while in vivo thrombin generation was increased and fibrinolysis decreased. Thrombosis may be driven by increased thrombin formation in vivo.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Blood Coagulation Tests , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Fibrinolysis , Hemostasis , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombelastography , Thrombin
9.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 53(3): 646-662, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439746

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 patients demonstrate hypercoagulability, necessitating thromboprophylaxis. However, less is known about the haemostatic profile in mild COVID-19 patients. We performed an age and gender-matched prospective study of 10 severe and 10 mild COVID-19 patients. Comprehensive coagulation profiling together with Thromboelastography and Clot Waveform Analysis were performed. FBC, PT, APTT, D-dimer, fibrinogen and CWA were repeated every 3 days for both groups and repeat TEG was performed for severe patients up till 15 days. On recruitment, severe patients had markers reflecting hypercoagulability including raised median D-dimer 1.0 µg/mL (IQR 0.6, 1.4) (p = 0.0004), fibrinogen 5.6 g/L (IQR 4.9, 6.6) (p = 0.002), Factor VIII 206% (IQR 171, 203) and vWF levels 265.5% (IQR 206, 321). Mild patients had normal values of PT, aPTT, fibrinogen and D-dimer, and slightly elevated median Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels. Repeated 3-day assessments for both groups showed declining trends in D-dimer and Fibrinogen. CWA of severe COVID-19 group demonstrated hypercoagulability with an elevated median values of aPTT delta change 78.8% (IQR 69.8, 85.2) (p = 0.001), aPTT clot velocity (min1) 7.8%/s (IQR 6.7, 8.3) (p = 0.001), PT delta change 22.4% (IQR 19.4, 29.5) (p = 0.004), PT min1 7.1%/s (IQR 6.3, 9.0) (p = 0.02), PT clot acceleration (min 2) 3.6%/s2 (IQR 3.2, 4.5) (p = 0.02) and PT clot deceleration (max2) 2.9%/s2 (IQR 2.5, 3.5) (p = 0.02). TEG of severe patients reflected hypercoagulability with significant increases in the median values of CFF MA 34.6 mm (IQR 27.4,38.6) (p = 0.003), CRT Angle 78.9° (IQR 78.3, 80.0) (p = 0.0006), CRT A10 67.6 mm (IQR 65.8, 69.6) (p = 0.007) and CFF A10 32.0 mm (IQR 26.8, 34.0) (p = 0.003). Mild COVID-19 patients had absent hypercoagulability in both CWA and TEG. 2 severe patients developed thromboembolic events while none occurred in the mild COVID-19 group. Mild COVID-19 patients show absent parameters of hypercoagulability in global haemostatic tests while those with severe COVID-19 demonstrated parameters associated with hypercoagulability on the global haemostatic tests together with raised D-Dimer, fibrinogen, Factor VIII and vWF levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemostatics , Thrombophilia , Thrombosis , Venous Thromboembolism , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Factor VIII , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , Prospective Studies , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , von Willebrand Factor
10.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 68(12): e29355, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1414402

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterize viscoelastic testing profiles of children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). METHODS: This single-center retrospective review included 30 patients diagnosed with MIS-C from March 1 to September 1, 2020. Thromboelastography (TEG) with platelet mapping was performed in 19 (63%) patients and compared to age- and sex-matched controls prior to cardiac surgery. Relationships between TEG parameters and inflammatory markers were assessed using correlation. RESULTS: Patients with MIS-C had abnormal TEG results compared to controls, including decreased kinetic (K) time (1.1 vs. 1.7 minutes, p < .01), increased alpha angle (75.0° vs. 65.7°, p < .01), increased maximum amplitude (70.8 vs. 58.3 mm, p < .01), and decreased lysis in 30 minutes (Ly30) (1.1% vs. 3.7%, p = .03); consistent with increased clot formation rate and strength, and reduced fibrinolysis. TEG maximum amplitude was moderately correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = 0.60, p = .02), initial platelet count (r = 0.67, p < .01), and peak platelet count (r = 0.51, p = .03). TEG alpha angle was moderately correlated with peak platelet count (r = 0.54, p = .02). Seventeen (57%) patients received aspirin (ASA) and anticoagulation, five (17%) received only ASA, and three (10%) received only anticoagulation. No patients had a symptomatic thrombotic event. Six (20%) patients had a bleeding event, none of which was major. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with MIS-C had evidence of hypercoagulability on TEG. Increased ESR and platelets were associated with higher clot strength. Patients were prophylactically treated with ASA or anticoagulation with no symptomatic thrombosis or major bleeding. Further multicenter study is required to characterize the rate of thrombosis and optimal thromboprophylaxis algorithm in this patient population.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/blood , Thrombophilia/blood , Adolescent , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Platelets/drug effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/drug therapy
11.
Surgery ; 171(4): 1092-1099, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401876

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated rotational thromboelastometry tracings in 44 critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 patients, to determine whether there is a viscoelastic fingerprint and to test the hypothesis that the diagnosis and prediction of venous thromboembolism would be enhanced by the addition of rotational thromboelastometry testing. RESULTS: Rotational thromboelastometry values reflected an increase in clot strength for the EXTEM, INTEM, and FIBTEM assays beyond the reference range. No hyperfibrinolysis was noted. Fibrinolysis shutdown was present but did not correlate with thrombosis; 32% (14/44) of patients experienced a thrombotic episode. For every 1 mm increase of FIBTEM maximum clot formation, the odds of developing thrombosis increased 20% (95% confidence interval, 0-40%, P = .043), whereas for every 1,000 ng/mL increase in D-dimer, the odds of thrombosis increased by 70% (95% confidence interval, 20%-150%, P = .004), after adjustment for age and sex (AUC 0.96, 95% confidence interval, 0.90-1.00). There was a slight but significant improvement in model performance after adding FIBTEM maximum clot formation and EXTEM clot formation time to D-dimer in a multivariable model (P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: D-dimer concentrations were more predictive of thrombosis in our patient population than any other parameter. Rotational thromboelastometry confirmed the hypercoagulable state of coronavirus disease 2019 intensive care unit patients. FIBTEM maximum clot formation and EXTEM clot formation time increased the predictability for thrombosis compared with only using D-dimer. Rotational thromboelastometry analysis is most useful in augmenting the information provided by the D-dimer concentration for venous thromboembolism risk assessment when the D-dimer concentration is between 1,625 and 6,900 ng/dL, but the enhancement is modest. Fibrinolysis shutdown did not correlate with thrombosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Thrombophilia , Thrombosis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/etiology
12.
Platelets ; 33(4): 520-530, 2022 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347990

ABSTRACT

We carried out a literature search in MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE literature databases to provide a concise review of the role of viscoelastic testing in assessing peri-interventional platelet function and coagulation. The search identified 130 articles that were relevant for the review, covering the basic science of VHA and VHA in clinical settings including cardiac surgery, cardiology, neurology, trauma, non-cardiac surgery, obstetrics, liver disease, and COVID-19. Evidence from these articles is used to describe the important role of VHAs and platelet function testing in various peri-interventional setups. VHAs can help us to comprehensively assess the contribution of platelets and coagulation dynamics to clotting at the site-of-care much faster than standard laboratory measures. In addition to standard coagulation tests, VHAs are beneficial in reducing allogeneic transfusion requirements and bleeding, in predicting ischemic events, and improving outcomes in several peri-interventional care settings. Further focused studies are needed to confirm their utility in the peri-interventional case.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Tests , Hemostasis , Humans , Thrombelastography
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(23): e26313, 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324830

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: In coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to optimal conventional management, we should consider the indication for veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO). Growing evidence indicates that COVID-19 frequently causes coagulopathy, presenting as hypercoagulation and incidental thrombosis. For these reasons, a multifactorial approach with several anticoagulant markers should be considered in the management of anticoagulation using heparin in COVID-19 patients on V-V ECMO. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 48-year-old man was infected with COVID-19 with a worsening condition manifesting as acute respiratory distress syndrome. DIAGNOSES: He was refractory to conventional therapy, thus we decided to introduce V-V ECMO. We used heparin as an anticoagulant therapy for V-V ECMO and adjusted the doses of heparin by careful monitoring of the activated clotting time (ACT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) to avoid both hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications. We controlled the doses of heparin in the therapeutic ranges of ACT and APTT, but clinical hemorrhaging and profound elevation of coagulant marker became apparent. INTERVENTIONS: Using thromboelastography (TEG; Haemonetics) in addition to ACT and APTT, we were able to clearly detect not only sufficient coagulability of COVID19 on V-V ECMO (citrated rapid thromboelastography-R 0.5 min, angle 75.5°, MA 64.0 mm, citrated functional fibrinogen-MA 20.7 mm) but also an excessive effect of heparin (citrated kaolin -R 42.7 min, citrated kaolin with heparinase 11.7 min). OUTCOMES: Given the TEG findings indicating an excessive heparin effect, the early withdrawal of ECMO was considered. After an evaluation of the patient's respiratory capacity, withdrawal from V-V ECMO was achieved and then anticoagulation was stopped. The hemorrhagic complications and elevated thrombotic marker levels dramatically decreased. LESSONS: TEG monitoring might be a useful option for managing anticoagulation in COVID-19 patients on V-V ECMO frequently showing a hypercoagulative state and requiring massive doses of heparin, to reduce both hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/complications , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Heparin/administration & dosage , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Thrombelastography , Hemorrhage/chemically induced , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
14.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 43 Suppl 1: 36-42, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319316

ABSTRACT

The alterations in the hemostatic balance in COVID-19 patients are strongly disturbed and contribute to a high prothrombotic status. The high rate of venous thromboembolism in COVID-19 patients goes along with derangements in coagulation laboratory parameters. Hemostasis testing has an important role in diagnosed COVID-19 patients. Elevated D-dimer levels were found to be a crucial laboratory marker in the risk assessment of thrombosis in COVID-19 patients. The diagnostic approach also includes prothrombin time and platelet count. Fibrinogen might give an indication for worsening coagulopathy. Other markers (activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinolysis parameters, coagulation factors, natural anticoagulants, antiphospholipid antibodies and parameters obtained by thromboelastography or thrombin generation assays) have been described as being deranged. These may help to understand the pathophysiology of thrombosis in COVID-19 patients but have currently no place in diagnosis or management in COVID-19 patients. For monitoring the heparin anticoagulant therapy, the anti-Xa assay is suggested, because the severe acute-phase reaction (high fibrinogen and high factor VIII) shortens the aPTT.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Tests , COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/etiology , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation Factors/analysis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Factor Xa/analysis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrinogen/analysis , Fibrinolysis , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Platelet Count , Prothrombin Time , Thrombelastography , Thrombin/biosynthesis , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy
15.
J Thromb Haemost ; 18(7): 1738-1742, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317984

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe inflammatory state secondary to COVID-19 leads to a severe derangement of hemostasis that has been recently described as a state of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and consumption coagulopathy, defined as decreased platelet count, increased fibrin(ogen) degradation products such as D-dimer, as well as low fibrinogen. AIMS: Whole blood from 24 patients admitted at the intensive care unit because of COVID-19 was collected and evaluated with thromboelastography by the TEG point-of-care device on a single occasion and six underwent repeated measurements on two consecutive days for a total of 30 observations. Plasma was evaluated for the other parameters of hemostasis. RESULTS: TEG parameters are consistent with a state of hypercoagulability as shown by decreased values, and increased values of K angle and MA. Platelet count was normal or increased, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were near(normal). Fibrinogen was increased and D-dimer was dramatically increased. C-reactive protein was increased. Factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (n = 11) were increased. Antithrombin (n = 11) was marginally decreased and protein C (n = 11) was increased. CONCLUSION: The results of this cohort of patients with COVID-19 are not consistent with acute DIC, rather they support hypercoagulability together with a severe inflammatory state. These findings may explain the events of venous thromboembolism observed in some of these patients and support antithrombotic prophylaxis/treatment. Clinical trials are urgently needed to establish the type of drug, dosage, and optimal duration of prophylaxis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Blood Coagulation , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/virology , Young Adult
16.
J Clin Monit Comput ; 36(1): 55-69, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310578

ABSTRACT

Abnormal coagulation parameters are often observed in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and the severity of derangement has been associated with a poor prognosis. The COVID-19 associated coagulopathy (CAC) displays unique features that include a high risk of developing thromboembolic complications. Viscoelastic tests (VETs), such as thromboelastometry (ROTEM), thromboelastography (TEG) and Quantra Hemostasis Analyzer (Quantra), provide "dynamic" data on clot formation and dissolution; they are used in different critical care settings, both in hemorrhagic and in thrombotic conditions. In patients with severe COVID-19 infection VETs can supply to clinicians more information about the CAC, identifying the presence of hypercoagulable and hypofibrinolysis states. In the last year, many studies have proposed to explain the underlying characteristics of CAC; however, there remain many unanswered questions. We tried to address some of the important queries about CAC through VETs analysis.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Blood Coagulation Disorders/diagnosis , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Hemostasis , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombelastography/adverse effects
17.
Shock ; 55(3): 316-320, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304005

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has threatened millions of lives worldwide with severe systemic inflammation, organ dysfunction, and thromboembolic disease. Within our institution, many critically ill COVID-19-positive patients suffered major thrombotic events, prompting our clinicians to evaluate hypercoagulability outside of traditional coagulation testing.We determined the prevalence of fibrinolysis shutdown via rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM, Instrumentation Laboratories, Bedford, Mass) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit over a period of 3 weeks. In 25 patients who had a ROTEM test, we found that 11 (44%) met criteria for fibrinolysis shutdown. Eight of 9 (73%) of the VTE patients met criteria for fibrinolysis shutdown.Given the high rate of fibrinolysis shutdown in these patients, our data support using viscoelastic testing to evaluate for the presence of impaired fibrinolysis. This may help identify patient subsets who might benefit from the administration of fibrinolytics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolysis , Intensive Care Units , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Decision-Making , Female , Fibrinolysis/drug effects , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
18.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(13)2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295857

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulation is one of the major risk factors for ICU treatment, mechanical ventilation, and death in critically ill patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. At the same time, hypoalbuminemia is one risk factor in such patients, independent of age and comorbidities. Especially in patients with severe SARS-CoV-2-infection, albumin infusion may be essential to improve hemodynamics and to reduce the plasma level of the main marker of thromboembolism, namely, the D-dimer plasma level, as suggested by a recent report. Albumin is responsible for 80% of the oncotic pressure in the vessels. This is necessary to keep enough water within the systemic circulatory system and for the maintenance of sufficient blood pressure, as well as for sufficient blood supply for vital organs like the brain, lungs, heart, and kidney. The liver reacts to a decrease in oncotic pressure with an increase in albumin synthesis. This is normally possible through the use of amino acids from the proteins introduced with the nutrients reaching the portal blood. If these are not sufficiently provided with the diet, amino acids are delivered to the liver from muscular proteins by systemic circulation. The liver is also the source of coagulation proteins, such as fibrinogen, fibronectin, and most of the v WF VIII, which are physiological components of the extracellular matrix of the vessel wall. While albumin is the main negative acute-phase protein, fibrinogen, fibronectin, and v WF VIII are positive acute-phase proteins. Acute illnesses cause the activation of defense mechanisms (acute-phase reaction) that may lead to an increase of fibrinolysis and an increase of plasma level of fibrinogen breakdown products, mainly fibrin and D-dimer. The measurement of the plasma level of the D-dimer has been used as a marker for venous thromboembolism, where a fourfold increase of the D-dimer plasma level was used as a negative prognostic marker in critically ill SARS-CoV-2 hospitalized patients. Increased fibrinolysis can take place in ischemic peripheral sites, where the mentioned coagulation proteins can become part of the provisional clot (e.g., in the lungs). Although critically ill SARS-CoV-2-infected patients are considered septic shock patients, albumin infusions have not been considered for hemodynamic resuscitation and as anticoagulants. The role of coagulation factors as provisional components of the extracellular matrix in case of generalized peripheral ischemia due to hypoalbuminemia and hypovolemia is discussed in this review.


Subject(s)
Albumins/administration & dosage , COVID-19/therapy , Hemodilution/methods , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/metabolism , Critical Illness/therapy , Fibrinolysis/drug effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombelastography
19.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211027653, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286792

ABSTRACT

Identifying a hypercoagulable state in patients with COVID-19 may help identify those at risk for virus-induced thromboembolic events and improve clinical outcomes using personalized therapeutic approaches. Herein, we aimed to perform a global assessment of the patients' hemostatic system with COVID-19 using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and to describe whether patients with different disease severities present different coagulation profiles. Together with 37 healthy volunteers, a total of 65 patients were included and then classified as having mild, moderate, and severe disease depending on clinical severity. Peripheral blood samples were collected and analyzed using a ROTEM Coagulation Analyzer. Also, complete blood count and coagulation parameters including prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen levels, and D-dimer levels were measured at admission. EXTEM and INTEM MCF (P < 0.001) values were significantly higher and the EXTEM CFT (P = 0.002) value was significantly lower in patients with COVID-19 when compared with controls. In particular, patients with the severe disease showed a significant decrease in CFT (P < 0.001) and an increase in MCF (P < 0.001) in both INTEM and EXTEM assays compared with patients with the non-severe disease. Correlation analysis revealed significant correlations between ROTEM parameters and other coagulation parameters. There were significant positive correlations between fibrinogen, D-dimer, platelet count, and MCF in both EXTEM and INTEM assays. Our data demonstrate thromboelastographic signs of hypercoagulability in patients with COVID-19, which is more pronounced in patients with increased disease severity. Therefore, ROTEM analysis can classify subsets of patients with COVID-19 at significant thrombotic risk and assist in clinical decisions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/etiology , Adult , Blood Cell Count , Blood Coagulation Tests , Blood Proteins/analysis , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/diagnosis
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 13325, 2021 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281739

ABSTRACT

COVID 19 is associated with a hypercoagulable state and frequent thromboembolic complications. For how long this acquired abnormality lasts potentially requiring preventive measures, such as anticoagulation remains to be delineated. We used viscoelastic rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM) in a single center cohort of 13 critical ill patients and performed follow up examinations three months after discharge from ICU. We found clear signs of a hypercoagulable state due to severe hypofibrinolysis and a high rate of thromboembolic complications during the phase of acute illness. Three month follow up revealed normalization of the initial coagulation abnormality and no evidence of venous thrombosis in all thirteen patients. In our cohort the coagulation profile was completely normalized three months after COVID-19. Based on these findings, discontinuation of anticoagulation can be discussed in patients with complete venous reperfusion.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Thrombelastography , Thromboembolism , Venous Thrombosis , Aged , Blood Coagulation , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Thromboembolism/pathology , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/pathology
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