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1.
BMC Neurol ; 22(1): 22, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1630329

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We investigated the impact of the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the resulting lockdown on reperfusion treatments and door-to-treatment times during the first surge in Dutch comprehensive stroke centers. Furthermore, we studied the association between COVID-19-status and treatment times. METHODS: We included all patients receiving reperfusion treatment in 17 Dutch stroke centers from May 11th, 2017, until May 11th, 2020. We collected baseline characteristics, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, onset-to-door time (ODT), door-to-needle time (DNT), door-to-groin time (DGT) and COVID-19-status at admission. Parameters during the lockdown (March 15th, 2020 until May 11th, 2020) were compared with those in the same period in 2019, and between groups stratified by COVID-19-status. We used nationwide data and extrapolated our findings to the increasing trend of EVT numbers since May 2017. RESULTS: A decline of 14% was seen in reperfusion treatments during lockdown, with a decline in both IVT and EVT delivery. DGT increased by 12 min (50 to 62 min, p-value of < 0.001). Furthermore, median NIHSS-scores were higher in COVID-19 - suspected or positive patients (7 to 11, p-value of 0.004), door-to-treatment times did not differ significantly when stratified for COVID-19-status. CONCLUSIONS: During the first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, a decline in acute reperfusion treatments and a delay in DGT was seen, which indicates a target for attention. It also appeared that COVID-19-positive or -suspected patients had more severe neurologic symptoms, whereas their EVT-workflow was not affected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Stroke , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
3.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 76: 285-288, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525691

ABSTRACT

The arterial revascularization procedure is still a challenging issue in Covid-19 associated limb ischemia. Herein we aimed to present a case of a 64 year-old woman with acute ischemic signs in upper extremity who was diagnosed as a probable Covid-19 case incidentally after admission. Although late admission and failed recurrent embolectomies lead to an eventful course, intra-arterial thrombolysis seemed to present a benefitable treatment option for our patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Ischemia/etiology , Upper Extremity/blood supply , Acute Disease , Amputation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Embolectomy , Female , Humans , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/physiopathology , Ischemia/therapy , Middle Aged , Regional Blood Flow , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
5.
Neurologist ; 26(6): 271-273, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501227

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Wake-up strokes are challenging to manage due to unknown time of onset. Recently, the wake-up trial demonstrated that recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) could be administered based on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- diffusion weighted imaging/fluid attenuated inversion recovery mismatch. Many still doubt the safety results due to the higher rate of hemorrhagic conversion reported. Although it was statistically insignificant, the study was terminated early. Furthermore, Corona virus disease-19 is associated with coagulopathy and a higher risk of hemorrhagic conversion. CASE REPORT: A 46-year-old fully functioning male presented with a wake-up right hemiparesis, right facial droop, and expressive aphasia. His National Institute of Health Stroke Scale was 4 upon arrival. Last known well state was >4.5 hours. He tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 viral infection. He had left distal-M2 occlusion. He was deemed not a candidate for rtPA. Hyperacute-MRI protocol showed diffusion weighted imaging/fluid attenuated inversion recovery mismatch. The patient received rtPA at 6.5 hours from the last knwn well state. Follow-up MRI-susceptibility weighted imaging revealed fragmented clot. The stroke burden was less than that shown on the initial computed tomography-perfusion scans implying saved penumbra. There was no hemorrhagic conversion despite low fibrinogen levels. CONCLUSION: The hyperacute-MRI protocol for wake-up COVID-19 associated strokes might be a safe option.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/drug therapy , Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Stroke/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/therapeutic use
6.
Gac Med Mex ; 156(6): 559-569, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503050

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Mexico has the highest 30-day mortality due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), which constitutes one of the main causes of mortality in the country: 28 % versus 7.5 % on average for the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development member countries. OBJECTIVE: To establish critical pathways and essential interinstitutional pharmacological strategies for the care of patients with AMI in Mexico, regardless of their socioeconomic status. METHOD: A group of experts in AMI diagnosis and treatment, representatives of the main public health institutions in Mexico, as well as the Mexican cardiology societies, the Mexican Red Cross and representatives of the Spanish Society of Cardiology, were brought together in order to optimize strategies based on the best existing evidence. RESULTS: An interinstitutional clinical practice guideline was designed for early diagnosis and timely treatment of AMI with ST-segment elevation, following the clinical horizon of the disease, with the proposal of algorithms that improve the prognosis of patients who attend the emergency services due to an AMI. CONCLUSION: With these clinical practice guidelines, the group of experts proposes to universalize AMI diagnosis and treatment, regardless of patient socioeconomic status. INTRODUCCIÓN: México tiene la mortalidad más alta a 30 días por infarto agudo de miocardio (IAM), el cual constituye una de las principales causas de mortalidad en el país: 28 % versus 7.5 % del promedio de los países de la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económicos. OBJETIVO: Establecer las rutas críticas y las estrategias farmacológicas esenciales interinstitucionales para la atención de los pacientes con IAM en México, independientemente de su condición socioeconómica. MÉTODO: Se reunió a un grupo de expertos en diagnóstico y tratamiento de IAM, representantes de las principales instituciones públicas de salud de México, así como las sociedades cardiológicas mexicanas, Cruz Roja Mexicana y representantes de la Sociedad Española de Cardiología con la finalidad de optimizar las estrategias con base en la mejor evidencia existente. RESULTADOS: Se diseñó una guía de práctica clínica interinstitucional para el diagnóstico temprano y tratamiento oportuno del IAM con elevación del segmento ST, siguiendo el horizonte clínico de la enfermedad, con la propuesta de algoritmos que mejoren el pronóstico de los pacientes que acuden por IAM a los servicios de urgencias. CONCLUSIÓN: Con la presente guía práctica, el grupo de expertos propone universalizar el diagnóstico y tratamiento en el IAM, independientemente de la condición socioeconómica del paciente.


Subject(s)
Consensus , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Cause of Death , Electrocardiography , Humans , Mexico , Myocardial Reperfusion/methods , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/blood , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/rehabilitation , Societies, Medical , Spain , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods
7.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(2): 316-326, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493288

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism, occlusion of dialysis catheters, circuit thrombosis in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) devices, acute limb ischemia, and isolated strokes, all in the face of prophylactic and even therapeutic anticoagulation, are features of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) coagulopathy. It seems well established at this time that a COVID-19 patient deemed sick enough to be hospitalized, should receive at least prophylactic dose anticoagulation. However, should some hospitalized patients have dosage escalation to intermediate dose? Should some be considered for full-dose anticoagulation without a measurable thromboembolic event and how should that anticoagulation be monitored? Should patients receive postdischarge anticoagulation and with what medication and for how long? What thrombotic issues are related to the various medications being used to treat this coagulopathy? Is antiphospholipid antibody part of this syndrome? What is the significance of isolated ischemic stroke and limb ischemia in this disorder and how does this interface with the rest of the clinical and laboratory features of this disorder? The aims of this article are to explore these questions and interpret the available data based on the current evidence.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Ambulatory Care , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Combinations , Duration of Therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/immunology , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/immunology
9.
Curr Cardiol Rep ; 23(10): 152, 2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442178

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to offer a discussion on the existing data for the use of thrombolytic therapy for the treatment of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) as well to present an evidence-based approach regarding the treatment for STEMI patients presenting to non-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-capable hospitals during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: There have been tremendous advances in the care of STEMI patients over the past two decades with primary (PCI) being the standard of care. However, many hospitals do not have interventional cardiology services available, and either have to expeditiously transfer patients for primary PCI, or use the strategy of fibrinolysis therapy with facilitated or rescue PCI. The current COVID-19 crisis has created an unprecedented paradigm shift with regard to the decision-making algorithm for STEMI patients especially in non-PCI-capable hospitals. Depending on regional transfer systems and potential delay in primary PCI, a strategy of thrombolysis first could be entertained at certain regional systems of care. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a dramatic decline in the number of patient seeking care for myocardial infarction as well as a reduction in the accessibility of cardiac catheterization services. Regardless, professional societies continue to recommend PCI as the primary means of treatment for STEMI through the COVID-19 pandemic, and early multicenter data suggests the benefit of this therapy remains. Future research will be necessary and holds the key to proving this benefit persists beyond the immediate hospitalization time period both in the current era and in the context of possible future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(12): 106121, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415617

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is little information regarding the safety of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) in patients with stroke and COVID-19. METHODS: This multicenter study included consecutive stroke patients with and without COVID-19 treated with IV-tPA between February 18, 2019, to December 31, 2020, at 9 centers participating in the CASCADE initiative. Clinical outcomes included modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at hospital discharge, in-hospital mortality, the rate of hemorrhagic transformation. Using Bayesian multiple regression and after adjusting for variables with significant value in univariable analysis, we reported the posterior adjusted odds ratio (OR, with 95% Credible Intervals [CrI]) of the main outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 545 stroke patients, including 101 patients with COVID-19 were evaluated. Patients with COVID-19 had a more severe stroke at admission. In the study cohort, 85 (15.9%) patients had a hemorrhagic transformation, and 72 (13.1%) died in the hospital. After adjustment for confounding variables, discharge mRS score ≥2 (OR: 0.73, 95% CrI: 0.16, 3.05), in-hospital mortality (OR: 2.06, 95% CrI: 0.76, 5.53), and hemorrhagic transformation (OR: 1.514, 95% CrI: 0.66, 3.31) were similar in COVID-19 and non COVID-19 patients. High-sensitivity C reactive protein level was a predictor of hemorrhagic transformation in all cases (OR:1.01, 95%CI: 1.0026, 1.018), including those with COVID-19 (OR:1.024, 95%CI:1.002, 1.054). CONCLUSION: IV-tPA treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke and COVID-19 was not associated with an increased risk of disability, mortality, and hemorrhagic transformation compared to those without COVID-19. IV-tPA should continue to be considered as the standard of care in patients with hyper acute stroke and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Ischemic Stroke/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Disability Evaluation , Europe , Female , Fibrinolytic Agents/adverse effects , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous , Intracranial Hemorrhages/chemically induced , Iran , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Thrombolytic Therapy/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
13.
Int J Stroke ; 16(7): 771-783, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374086

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of the COVID pandemic on stroke network performance is unclear, particularly with consideration of drip&ship vs. mothership models. AIMS: We systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed variations in stroke admissions, rate and timing of reperfusion treatments during the first wave COVID pandemic vs. the pre-pandemic timeframe depending on stroke network model adopted. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS: The systematic review followed registered protocol (PROSPERO-CRD42020211535), PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL until 9 October 2020 for studies reporting variations in ischemic stroke admissions, treatment rates, and timing in COVID (first wave) vs. control-period. Primary outcome was the weekly admission incidence rate ratio (IRR = admissions during COVID-period/admissions during control-period). Secondary outcomes were (i) changes in rate of reperfusion treatments and (ii) time metrics for pre- and in-hospital phase. Data were pooled using random-effects models, comparing mothership vs. drip&ship model. Overall, 29 studies were included in quantitative synthesis (n = 212,960). COVID-period was associated with a significant reduction in stroke admission rates (IRR = 0.69, 95%CI = 0.61-0.79), with higher relative presentation of large vessel occlusion (risk ratio (RR) = 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.24-2.12). Proportions of patients treated with endovascular treatment increased (RR = 1.14, 95%CI = 1.02-1.28). Intravenous thrombolysis decreased overall (IRR = 0.72, 95%CI = 0.54-0.96) but not in the mothership model (IRR = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.43-1.52). Onset-to-door time was longer for the drip&ship in COVID-period compared to the control-period (+32 min, 95%CI = 0-64). Door-to-scan was longer in COVID-period (+5 min, 95%CI = 2-7). Door-to-needle and door-to-groin were similar in COVID-period and control-period. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a 35% drop in stroke admissions during the first pandemic wave, proportions of patients receiving reperfusion and time-metrics were not inferior to control-period. Mothership preserved the weekly rate of intravenous thrombolysis and the onset-to-door timing to pre-pandemic standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , Reperfusion , Time-to-Treatment
14.
Surg Radiol Anat ; 43(12): 2071-2076, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371354

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: An antegrade approach is frequently used in catheter-directed thrombolysis to remove deep-vein thrombosis. However, the antegrade approach is difficult when accessing veins with small diameters; therefore, understanding the variation of deep calf vein is important. METHODS: This study measured the diameters and surface areas of the proximal and distal posterior tibial vein, peroneal vein, and anterior tibial vein to determine which are preferable for venous access. This study dissected 132 legs from Korean and Thai cadavers. The proximal and distal posterior tibial vein, peroneal vein, and anterior tibial vein were scanned and measured. RESULTS: The mean diameter and surface area were largest for the proximal tibial vein, at 6.34 mm and 0.312 cm2, respectively, followed by the anterior tibial vein (5.22 mm and 0.213 cm2), distal posterior tibial vein (3.29 mm and 0.091 cm2), and peroneal vein (3.43 mm and 0.081 cm2). The proximal posterior tibial vein and anterior tibial vein have large diameters and surface areas, which make them ideal for applying an antegrade approach in catheter-directed thrombolysis. CONCLUSIONS: The distal posterior tibial vein and peroneal vein are not recommended due to their smaller surface areas and also the anatomical variations therein.


Subject(s)
Leg/anatomy & histology , Leg/blood supply , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cadaver , Catheters , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Thrombolytic Therapy/instrumentation , Veins/anatomy & histology
15.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 145(1): 47-52, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367290

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator is the core medical therapy of acute ischaemic stroke (AIS). COVID-19 infection negatively modifies acute stroke procedures and, due to its pro-coagulative effect, may potentially impact on IVT outcome. Thus, short-term efficacy and safety of IVT were compared in patients with and without evidence of SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: An observational, retrospective study included 70 patients with AIS, including 22 subjects (31%) with evidence of acute COVID-19 infection, consecutively treated with IVT in 4 stroke centres between 15 September and 30 November 2020. RESULTS: Patients infected with COVID-19 were characterized by higher median of National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (11.0 vs. 6.5; p < .01) and D-dimers (870 vs. 570; p = .03) on admission, higher presence of pneumonia (47.8% vs. 12%; p < .01) and lower percentage of 'minor stroke symptoms' (NIHSS 1-5 pts.) (2% vs., 18%; p < .01). Hospitalizations were longer in patients with COVID-19 than in those without it (17 vs. 9 days, p < .01), but impact of COVID-19 infection on patients' in-hospital mortality or functional status on dismission has been confirmed neither in uni- or multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 infection prolongs length of stay in hospital after IVT, but does not influence in-hospital outcome.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/drug therapy , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/drug therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
16.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(8)2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356921

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is caused by the SARS-CoV-2, and its presentation ranges from mild upper respiratory illness to critical disease including acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction. While it was initially believed to primarily target the respiratory system, numerous studies have demonstrated it to cause a hypercoagulable state that predisposes to arterial and venous thrombosis. We present a case where a patient with COVID-19 developed acute lower limb ischaemia due to arterial thrombosis in the setting of full-dose enoxaparin, followed by heparin infusion protocol. The patient developed recurrent ischaemia despite thrombolysis in addition to anticoagulation, and eventually required open thrombectomy before making a full recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Humans , Ischemia/drug therapy , Ischemia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy
17.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106035, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Most data on telestroke utilization come from single academic hub-and-spoke telestroke networks. Our objective was to describe characteristics of telestroke consultations among a national sample of telestroke sites on one of the most commonly used common vendor platforms, prior to the COVID-19 public health emergency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A commercial telestroke vendor provided data on all telestroke consultations by two specialist provider groups from 2013-2019. Kendall's τ ß nonparametric test was utilized to assess time trends. Generalized linear models were used to assess the association between hospital consult utilization and alteplase use adjusting for hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Among 67,736 telestroke consultations to 132 spoke sites over the study period, most occurred in the emergency department (90%) and for stroke indications (final clinical diagnoses: TIA 13%, ischemic stroke 39%, hemorrhagic stroke 2%, stroke mimics 46%). Stroke severity was low (median NIHSS 2, IQR 0-6). Alteplase was recommended for 23% of ischemic stroke patients. From 2013 to 2019, times from ED arrival to NIHSS, CT scan, imaging review, consult, and alteplase administration all decreased (p<0.05 for all), while times from consult start to alteplase recommendation and bolus increased (p<0.01 for both). Transfer was recommended for 8% of ischemic stroke patients. Number of patients treated with alteplase per hospital increased with increasing number of consults and hospital size and was also associated with US region in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Longer duration of hospital participation in the network was associated with shorter hospital median door-to-needle time for alteplase delivery (39 min shorter per year, p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Among spoke sites using a commercial telestroke platform over a seven-year time horizon, times to consult start and alteplase bolus decreased over time. Similar to academic networks, duration of telestroke participation in this commercial network was associated with faster alteplase delivery, suggesting practice improves performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Remote Consultation/trends , Stroke/surgery , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Improvement/trends , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States
18.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(1): 105-113, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348130

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Many countries worldwide, including Germany, reported that the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020 influenced the care of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, but data are lacking for further pandemic wave periods. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide, retrospective, cross-sectional study of all hospitalized patients with the main diagnosis of AIS in 2019 and 2020. Primary outcomes were the number of hospitalizations for AIS, the application of stroke unit care, intravenous thrombolysis (IVT), and mechanical thrombectomy (MT), as well as the in-hospital mortality during the different pandemic periods in 2020 compared to the corresponding periods in 2019. Secondarily, we analyzed differences in outcomes between patients with and without concurrent COVID-19. RESULTS: We included 429,841 cases with AIS, of which 1268 had concurrent COVID-19. Hospitalizations for AIS declined during both pandemic wave periods in 2020 (first wave: -10.9%, second wave: -4.6%). MT rates were consistently higher throughout 2020 compared to 2019, whereas the IVT rate dropped during the second wave period (16.0% vs. 17.0%, p < 0.001). AIS patients with concurrent COVID-19 frequently received recanalization treatments, with an overall MT rate of 8.4% and IVT rate of 15.9%. The in-hospital mortality was high (22.8% vs. 7.5% in noninfected AIS patients, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate a smaller decline in hospitalizations for AIS in the more severe second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. AIS patients with and without concurrent COVID-19 who did seek acute care continued to receive recanalization treatments in Germany.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Treatment Outcome
19.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 75: 140-143, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340555

ABSTRACT

The incidence of venous and arterial thromboembolic complications in COVID-19 patients is significant. The vast majority of COVID-19 patients spend their quarantine at home in a self-isolation condition. The occurrence of Acute limb ischemia (ALI) is a dangerous event that needs prompt diagnosis and management with time-dependent recanalization outcomes. We present a case series of three COVID-19 patients who suffered from ALI that occurred during home self-isolation, and that were diagnosed and treated with a significant time-delay due to COVID-19 social implications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Delayed Diagnosis , Diagnostic Errors , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Peripheral Arterial Disease/diagnostic imaging , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Amputation , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Embolectomy , Humans , Ischemia/etiology , Ischemia/surgery , Male , Peripheral Arterial Disease/etiology , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , Predictive Value of Tests , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
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