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2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106035, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Most data on telestroke utilization come from single academic hub-and-spoke telestroke networks. Our objective was to describe characteristics of telestroke consultations among a national sample of telestroke sites on one of the most commonly used common vendor platforms, prior to the COVID-19 public health emergency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A commercial telestroke vendor provided data on all telestroke consultations by two specialist provider groups from 2013-2019. Kendall's τ ß nonparametric test was utilized to assess time trends. Generalized linear models were used to assess the association between hospital consult utilization and alteplase use adjusting for hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Among 67,736 telestroke consultations to 132 spoke sites over the study period, most occurred in the emergency department (90%) and for stroke indications (final clinical diagnoses: TIA 13%, ischemic stroke 39%, hemorrhagic stroke 2%, stroke mimics 46%). Stroke severity was low (median NIHSS 2, IQR 0-6). Alteplase was recommended for 23% of ischemic stroke patients. From 2013 to 2019, times from ED arrival to NIHSS, CT scan, imaging review, consult, and alteplase administration all decreased (p<0.05 for all), while times from consult start to alteplase recommendation and bolus increased (p<0.01 for both). Transfer was recommended for 8% of ischemic stroke patients. Number of patients treated with alteplase per hospital increased with increasing number of consults and hospital size and was also associated with US region in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Longer duration of hospital participation in the network was associated with shorter hospital median door-to-needle time for alteplase delivery (39 min shorter per year, p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Among spoke sites using a commercial telestroke platform over a seven-year time horizon, times to consult start and alteplase bolus decreased over time. Similar to academic networks, duration of telestroke participation in this commercial network was associated with faster alteplase delivery, suggesting practice improves performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Remote Consultation/trends , Stroke/surgery , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Improvement/trends , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States
4.
Vasc Med ; 26(4): 426-433, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1166685

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) may predispose patients to venous thromboembolism (VTE). Limited data are available on the utilization of the Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT) in the setting of the COVID-19 global pandemic. We performed a single-center study to evaluate treatment, mortality, and bleeding outcomes in patients who received PERT consultations in March and April 2020, compared to historical controls from the same period in 2019. Clinical data were abstracted from the electronic medical record. The primary study endpoints were inpatient mortality and GUSTO moderate-to-severe bleeding. The frequency of PERT utilization was nearly threefold higher during March and April 2020 (n = 74) compared to the same period in 2019 (n = 26). During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was significantly less PERT-guided invasive treatment (5.5% vs 23.1%, p = 0.02) with a numerical but not statistically significant trend toward an increase in the use of systemic fibrinolytic therapy (13.5% vs 3.9%, p = 0.3). There were nonsignificant trends toward higher in-hospital mortality or moderate-to-severe bleeding in patients receiving PERT consultations during the COVID-19 period compared to historical controls (mortality 14.9% vs 3.9%, p = 0.18 and moderate-to-severe bleeding 35.1% vs 19.2%, p = 0.13). In conclusion, PERT utilization was nearly threefold higher during the COVID-19 pandemic than during the historical control period. Among patients evaluated by PERT, in-hospital mortality or moderate-to-severe bleeding were not significantly different, despite being numerically higher, while invasive therapy was utilized less frequently during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Resources/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Patient Care Team/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Venous Thromboembolism/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hemorrhage/etiology , Hemorrhage/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/mortality
5.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 8(4): 929-937, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092495

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To review the global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on stroke care-metrics and report data from a health system in Houston. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of the published literature reporting stroke admissions, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) cases, number of thrombolysis (tPA) and thrombectomy (MT) cases, and time metrics (door to needle, DTN; and door to groin time, DTG) during the pandemic compared to prepandemic period. Within our hospital system, between January-June 2019 and January-June 2020, we compared the proportion of stroke admissions and door to tPA and MT times. RESULTS: A total of 32,640 stroke admissions from 29 studies were assessed. Compared to prepandemic period, the mean ratio of stroke admissions during the pandemic was 70.78% [95% CI, 65.02%, 76.54%], ICH cases was 83.10% [95% CI, 71.01%, 95.17%], tPA cases was 81.74% [95% CI, 72.33%, 91.16%], and MT cases was 88.63% [95% CI, 74.12%, 103.13%], whereas DTN time was 104.48% [95% CI, 95.52%, 113.44%] and DTG was 104.30% [95% CI, 81.99%, 126.61%]. In Houston, a total of 4808 cases were assessed. There was an initial drop of ~30% in cases at the pandemic onset. Compared to 2019, there was a significant reduction in mild strokes (NIHSS 1-5) [N (%), 891 (43) vs 635 (40), P = 0.02]. There were similar mean (SD) (mins) DTN [44 (17) vs 42 (17), P = 0.14] but significantly prolonged DTG times [94 (15) vs 85 (20), P = 0.005] in 2020. INTERPRETATION: The COVID-19 pandemic led to a global reduction in stroke admissions and treatment interventions and prolonged treatment time metrics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Patient Admission/trends , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Humans , Pandemics , Texas/epidemiology , Thrombectomy/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends
6.
Neurol Sci ; 42(1): 15-20, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064519

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has changed routine clinical practice worldwide with major impacts on the provision of care and treatment for stroke patients. METHODS: This retrospective observational study included all patients admitted to the Royal Stoke University Hospital in Stoke-on-Trent, UK, with a stroke or transient ischaemic attack between March 15th and April 14th, 2020 (COVID). Patient demographics, characteristics of the stroke, treatment details and logistics were compared with patients admitted in the corresponding weeks in the year before (2019). RESULTS: There was a 39.5% (n = 101 vs n = 167) reduction in admissions in the COVID cohort compared with 2019 with more severe strokes (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) 7 vs 4, p = 0.02), and fewer strokes with no visible acute pathology (21.8 vs 37.1%, p = 0.01) on computed tomography. There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of thrombolysis (10.9 vs 13.2%, p = 0.72) and/or thrombectomy (5.9 vs 4.8%, p = 0.90) and no statistically significant difference in time from stroke onset to arrival at hospital (734 vs 576 min, p = 0.34), door-to-needle time for thrombolysis (54 vs 64 min, p = 0.43) and door-to-thrombectomy time (181 vs 445 min, p = 0.72). Thirty-day mortality was not significantly higher in the COVID year (10.9 vs 8.9%, p = 0.77). None of the 7 stroke patients infected with COVID-19 died. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of stroke admissions fell, and stroke severity increased. There was no statistically significant change in the delivery of thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy and no increase in mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Attack, Transient/therapy , Mechanical Thrombolysis/statistics & numerical data , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Stroke/therapy , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Thrombolytic Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Ischemic Attack, Transient/drug therapy , Male , Mechanical Thrombolysis/trends , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Stroke/drug therapy , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , United Kingdom
7.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 201: 106436, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059739

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate overall ischemic stroke volumes and rates, specific subtypes, and clinical presentation during the COVID-19 pandemic in a multicenter observational study from eight states across US. METHODS: We compared all ischemic strokes admitted between January 2019 and May 2020, grouped as; March-May 2020 (COVID-19 period) and March-May 2019 (seasonal pre-COVID-19 period). Primary outcome was stroke severity at admission measured by NIHSS stratified as mild (0-7), moderate [8-14], and severe (>14). Secondary outcomes were volume of large vessel occlusions (LVOs), stroke etiology, IV-tPA rates, and discharge disposition. RESULTS: Of the 7969 patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke during the study period, 933 (12 %) presented in the COVID-19 period while 1319 (17 %) presented in the seasonal pre-COVID-19 period. Significant decline was observed in the mean weekly volumes of newly diagnosed ischemic strokes (98 ± 3 vs 50 ± 20,p = 0.003), LVOs (16.5 ± 3.8 vs 8.3 ± 5.9,p = 0.008), and IV-tPA (10.9 ± 3.4 vs 5.3 ± 2.9,p = 0.0047), whereas the mean weekly proportion of LVOs (18 % ±5 vs 16 % ±7,p = 0.24) and IV-tPA (10.4 % ±4.5 vs. 9.9 % ±2.4,p = 0.66) remained the same, when compared to the seasonal pre-COVID-19 period. Additionally, an increased proportion of patients presented with a severe disease (NIHSS > 14) during the COVID-19 period (29.7 % vs 24.5 %,p < 0.025). The odds of being discharged to home were 26 % greater in the COVID-19 period when compared to seasonal pre-COVID-19 period (OR:1.26, 95 % CI:1.07-1.49,p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: During COVID-19 period there was a decrease in volume of newly diagnosed ischemic stroke cases and IV-tPA administration. Patients admitted to the hospital had severe neurological clinical presentation and were more likely to discharge home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurology/trends , Societies, Medical/trends , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/epidemiology , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , United States/epidemiology , Vascular Diseases/drug therapy , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology
9.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(1): 105448, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023682

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The enforcement of complete lockdown with home confinement has been necessary to limit SARS-CoV-2 contagions in Italy, one the most affected countries worldwide. Simultaneously, in several Emergency Departments, a reduction in cardio- and cerebrovascular presentations was noticed. This study analyses the impact of Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown measures on the incidence of stroke, in Campania, the most densely-populated region in Italy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed data regarding acute stroke patients presenting at 5 Campania stroke hubs, before and after the issue of lockdown in Italy on March 9th, 2020. RESULTS: Compared to the pre-lockdown, we observed a significant reduction in the number of acute reperfusion treatments in stroke (P for interact 0.001); however the global number of patients presenting with acute stroke did not significantly differ. The time to reach medical attention was significantly longer in the lockdown phase (230 versus 154 min, P 0.016). For patients who underwent acute reperfusion treatment we also observed significantly longer time-to-imaging (30 versus 40 min, P 0.0005) and a trend to longer time-to-needle (75 versus 90 min P 0.23), but not time-to-groin. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed the reduction in acute reperfusion treatments for acute ischemic stroke and the slowdown of stroke pathways, during the lockdown phase of Covid-19 pandemic, in Campania, the third-most-populous and the most-densely populated Italian Region. In the next future, the risk for high-grade disability and death, due to delayed or even avoided hospital presentation due to fear of contagion, may be high.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Admission/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(6): 105569, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002839

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed evaluation of stroke may contribute to COVID-19 pandemic-related morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated patient characteristics, process measures and outcomes associated with the decline in stroke presentation during the early pandemic. METHODS: Volumes of stroke presentations, intravenous thrombolytic administrations, and mechanical thrombectomies from 52 hospitals from January 1-June 30, 2020 were analyzed with piecewise linear regression and linear spline models. Univariate analysis compared pandemic (case) and pre-pandemic (control) groups defined in relation to the nadir of daily strokes during the study period. Significantly different patient characteristics were further evaluated with logistic regression, and significantly different process measures and outcomes were re-analyzed after propensity score matching. RESULTS: Analysis of 7,389 patients found daily stroke volumes decreased 0.91/day from March 12-26 (p < 0.0001), reaching a nadir 35.0% less than expected, and increased 0.15 strokes/day from March 27-June 23, 2020 (p < 0.0001). Intravenous thrombolytic administrations decreased 3.3/week from February 19-March 31 (p = 0.0023), reaching a nadir 33.4% less than expected, and increased 1.4 administrations/week from April 1-June 23 (p < 0.0001). Mechanical thrombectomy volumes decreased by 1.5/week from February 19-March 31, 2020 (p = 0.0039), reaching a nadir 11.3% less than expected. The pandemic group was more likely to ambulate independently at baseline (p = 0.02, OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.08-2.42), and less likely to present with mild stroke symptoms (NIH Stroke Scale ≤ 5; p = 0.04, OR = 1.01, 95% CI = 1.00-1.02). Process measures and outcomes of each group did not differ, including door-to-needle time, door-to-puncture time, and successful mechanical thrombectomy rate. CONCLUSION: Stroke presentations and acute interventions decreased during the early COVID-19 pandemic, at least in part due to patients with lower baseline functional status and milder symptoms not seeking medical care. Public health messaging and initiatives should target these populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delayed Diagnosis/trends , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Functional Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/physiopathology , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 13(3): 202-206, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970181

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) results from infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). It was first reported in Wuhan, China in patients suffering from severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome and has now grown into the first pandemic in over 100 years. Patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop arterial thrombosis including stroke, myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial thrombosis, all of which result in poor outcomes despite maximal medical, endovascular, and microsurgical treatment compared with non-COVID-19-infected patients. In this review we provide a brief overview of SARS-CoV-2, the infectious agent responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, and describe the mechanisms responsible for COVID-19-associated coagulopathy. Finally, we discuss the impact of COVID-19 on ischemic stroke, focusing on large vessel occlusion.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Thrombosis/therapy
12.
J Cardiovasc Pharmacol ; 76(5): 540-548, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917717

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly spread worldwide. This study sought to share our experiences with in-hospital management and outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the COVID-19 pandemic. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive AMI patients, including those with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI (NSTEMI), from February 1, 2020, to April 15, 2020 (during the COVID-19 pandemic), and from January 1, 2019, to December 31, 2019 (before the COVID-19 pandemic), respectively. Fifty-three AMI patients (31 STEMI, 22 NSTEMI) during the COVID-19 pandemic were matched to 53 AMI patients before the pandemic. Baseline characteristics were comparable between the matched patients. STEMI patients during the COVID-19 pandemic had a longer delay time, less primary or remedial PCI and more emergency thrombolysis than those before the pandemic. Less coronary angiography and stenting were performed in AMI patients during the COVID-19 pandemic than before the pandemic. There were no statistically significant differences in the clinical outcomes between the matched patients. However, STEMI patients during the COVID-19 pandemic had a 4-fold (12.9% vs. 3.2%) increase in all-cause mortality rate compared with those before the pandemic. AMI combined with COVID-19 infection was associated with higher rates of mortality than AMI alone. This study demonstrates that the COVID-19 pandemic results in significant reperfusion delays in STEMI patients and has a marked impact on the treatment options selection in AMI patients. The mortality rate of STEMI patients exhibits an increasing trend during the pandemic of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Cardiology Service, Hospital/trends , Coronavirus Infections , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , Pneumonia, Viral , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , COVID-19 , China , Coronary Angiography/trends , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Patient Admission , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/instrumentation , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Thrombolytic Therapy/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
14.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105321, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872317

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted global healthcare systems and this may affect stroke care and outcomes. This study examines the changes in stroke epidemiology and care during the COVID-19 pandemic in Zanjan Province, Iran. METHODS: This study is part of the CASCADE international initiative. From February 18, 2019, to July 18, 2020, we followed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke hospitalization rates and outcomes in Valiasr Hospital, Zanjan, Iran. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model and an interrupted time series analysis (ITS) to identify changes in stroke hospitalization rate, baseline stroke severity [measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS)], disability [measured by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS)], presentation time (last seen normal to hospital presentation), thrombolytic therapy rate, median door-to-needle time, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality. We compared in-hospital mortality between study periods using Cox-regression model. RESULTS: During the study period, 1,026 stroke patients were hospitalized. Stroke hospitalization rates per 100,000 population decreased from 68.09 before the pandemic to 44.50 during the pandemic, with a significant decline in both Bayesian [Beta: -1.034; Standard Error (SE): 0.22, 95% CrI: -1.48, -0.59] and ITS analysis (estimate: -1.03, SE = 0.24, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we observed lower admission rates for patients with mild (NIHSS < 5) ischemic stroke (p < 0.0001). Although, the presentation time and door-to-needle time did not change during the pandemic, a lower proportion of patients received thrombolysis (-10.1%; p = 0.004). We did not see significant changes in admission rate to the stroke unit and in-hospital mortality rate; however, disability at discharge increased (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: In Zanjan, Iran, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted stroke outcomes and altered the delivery of stroke care. Observed lower admission rates for milder stroke may possibly be due to fear of exposure related to COVID-19. The decrease in patients treated with thrombolysis and the increased disability at discharge may indicate changes in the delivery of stroke care and increased pressure on existing stroke acute and subacute services. The results of this research will contribute to a similar analysis of the larger CASCADE dataset in order to confirm findings at a global scale and improve measures to ensure the best quality of care for stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Hospitalization/trends , Intracranial Hemorrhages/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bayes Theorem , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/diagnosis , Intracranial Hemorrhages/mortality , Iran/epidemiology , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Recovery of Function , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
15.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105343, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-845471

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak raised concerns over healthcare systems' ability to provide suitable care to stroke patients. In the present study, we examined the provision of stroke care in Kobe City during the COVID-19 epidemic, where some major stroke centers ceased to provide emergency care. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. The Kobe Stroke Network surveyed the number of stroke patients admitted to all primary stroke centers (PSCs) in the city between March 1 and May 23, 2020, and between March 3 and May 25, 2019. In addition, online meetings between all PSC directors were held regularly to share information. The survey items included emergency response system characteristics, number of patients with stroke hospitalized within 7 days of onset, administered treatment types (IV rt-PA, mechanical thrombectomy, surgery, and endovascular therapy), and stroke patients with confirmed COVID-19. RESULTS: During the period of interest in 2020, the number of stroke patients hospitalized across 13 PSCs was 813, which was 15.5% lower than that during the same period of 2019 (p = 0.285). The number of patients admitted with cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage decreased by 15.4% (p = 0.245), 16.1% (p = 0.659), and 14.0% (p = 0.715), respectively. However, the rates of mechanical thrombectomy and surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage were slightly increased by 12.1% (p = 0.754) and 5.0% (p = 0.538), respectively. PSCs that ceased to provide emergency care reported a decrease in the number of stroke cases of 65.7% compared with the same period in 2019, while other PSCs reported an increase of 0.8%. No case of a patient with stroke and confirmed COVID-19 was reported during the study period. CONCLUSION: Kobe City was able to maintain operation of its stroke care systems thanks to close cooperation among all city PSCs and a temporal decrease in the total number of stroke cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/trends , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
16.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105383, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-816740

ABSTRACT

Northwick Park Hospital in London, United Kingdom (UK) is one of the busiest stroke units in the country and is located in one of the areas most heavily affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in the first half of 2020. Admissions to the stroke unit and changes during the peak of COVID-19 were reviewed. Compared with the previous year, mean 96 patients were admitted with suspected stroke during April and May 2020 compared with mean 116 per month in non-COVID periods, ratio 0.82, P = 0.01. This reduction involved both strokes and mimics and was unlikely to have occurred by chance. Numbers of patients thrombolysed and of patients referred for thrombectomy decreased dramatically during this time. Mechanisms by which the COVID-19 pandemic and the March lockdown may have affected admissions to the unit are discussed. Reduced admissions to the stroke unit allowed it to contribute its resources to the care of patients with COVID-19 during the peak of admissions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Hospital Units/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , London/epidemiology , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Time Factors
18.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(12): 105344, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on hospital admissions and outcomes in patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: Single-center retrospective analysis of patients admitted to the hospital with acute ischemic stroke, between December 1st, 2019 and June 30th, 2020. Outcomes were classified as none-to-minimal disability, moderate-to-severe disability, and death based on discharge disposition, and compared between two time periods: pre-COVID-19 era (December 1st, 2019 to March 11th, 2020) and COVID-19 era (March 12th to June 30th, 2020). We also performed a comparative trend analysis for the equivalent period between 2019 and 2020. RESULTS: Five hundred and seventy-five patients with a mean age (years±SD) of 68±16 were admitted from December 1st, 2019 to June 30th, 2020, with a clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Of these, 255 (44.3%) patients were admitted during the COVID-19 era. We observed a 22.1% and 39.5% decline in admission for acute ischemic stroke in April and May 2020, respectively. A significantly higher percentage of patients with acute ischemic stroke received intravenous thrombolysis during the COVID-19 era (p = 0.020). In patients with confirmed COVID-19, we found a higher percentage of older men with preexisting comorbidities such as hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus but a lower rate of atrial fibrillation. In addition, we found a treatment delay in both intravenous thrombolysis (median 94.5 min versus 38 min) and mechanical thrombectomy (median 244 min versus 86 min) in patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection. There were no differences in patients' disposition including home, short-term, and long-term facility (p = 0.60). CONCLUSIONS: We observed a reduction of hospital admissions in acute ischemic strokes and some delay in reperfusion therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Prospective studies and a larger dataset analysis are warranted.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia/therapy , COVID-19 , Hospitalization/trends , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Ischemia/diagnosis , Brain Ischemia/mortality , Community Health Services/trends , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Recovery of Function , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Virginia
19.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 76(11): 1375-1384, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-764912

ABSTRACT

The worldwide pandemic caused by the novel acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has resulted in a new and lethal disease termed coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Although there is an association between cardiovascular disease and COVID-19, the majority of patients who need cardiovascular care for the management of ischemic heart disease may not be infected with this novel coronavirus. The objective of this document is to provide recommendations for a systematic approach for the care of patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is a recognition of two major challenges in providing recommendations for AMI care in the COVID-19 era. Cardiovascular manifestations of COVID-19 are complex with patients presenting with AMI, myocarditis simulating an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) presentation, stress cardiomyopathy, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, coronary spasm, or nonspecific myocardial injury, and the prevalence of COVID-19 disease in the U.S. population remains unknown with risk of asymptomatic spread. This document addresses the care of these patients focusing on 1) the varied clinical presentations; 2) appropriate personal protection equipment (PPE) for health care workers; 3) role of the Emergency Department, Emergency Medical System and the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory; and 4) Regional STEMI systems of care. During the COVID-19 pandemic, primary PCI remains the standard of care for STEMI patients at PCI capable hospitals when it can be provided in a timely fashion, with an expert team outfitted with PPE in a dedicated CCL room. A fibrinolysis-based strategy may be entertained at non-PCI capable referral hospitals or in specific situations where primary PCI cannot be executed or is not deemed the best option.


Subject(s)
Cardiology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Infection Control , Myocardial Infarction , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Pneumonia, Viral , Thrombolytic Therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , United States
20.
Can J Neurol Sci ; 48(1): 118-121, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744328

ABSTRACT

We reviewed stroke care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic at our stroke center and provincial telestroke system. We counted referrals to our prevention clinic, code strokes, thrombolysis, endovascular thrombectomies, and activations of a provincial telestroke system from February to April of 2017-2020. In April 2020, there was 28% reduction in prevention clinic referrals, 32% reduction in code strokes, and 26% reduction in telestroke activations compared to prior years. Thrombolysis and endovascular thrombectomy rates remained constant. Fewer patients received stroke services across the spectrum from prevention, acute care to telestroke care in Ontario, Canada, during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Referral and Consultation/trends , Stroke/epidemiology , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Humans , Ontario/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/prevention & control , Stroke/therapy , Telemedicine/trends , Thrombectomy/trends , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends
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