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1.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(4)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a severe immune-mediated disorder. We aim to report the neurologic features of children with PIMS-TS. METHODS: We identified children presenting to a large children's hospital with PIMS-TS from March to June 2020 and performed a retrospective medical note review, identifying clinical and investigative features alongside short-term outcome of children presenting with neurologic symptoms. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients with PIMS-TS were identified, 9 (12%) had neurologic involvement: altered conciseness (3), behavioral changes (3), focal neurology deficits (2), persistent headaches (2), hallucinations (2), excessive sleepiness (1), and new-onset focal seizures (1). Four patients had cranial images abnormalities. At 3-month follow-up, 1 child had died, 1 had hemiparesis, 3 had behavioral changes, and 4 completely recovered. Systemic inflammatory and prothrombotic markers were higher in patients with neurologic involvement (mean highest CRP 267 vs 202 mg/L, p = 0.05; procalcitonin 30.65 vs 13.11 µg/L, p = 0.04; fibrinogen 7.04 vs 6.17 g/L, p = 0.07; d-dimers 19.68 vs 7.35 mg/L, p = 0.005). Among patients with neurologic involvement, these markers were higher in those without full recovery at 3 months (ferritin 2284 vs 283 µg/L, p = 0.05; d-dimers 30.34 vs 6.37 mg/L, p = 0.04). Patients with and without neurologic involvement shared similar risk factors for PIMS-TS (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic ethnicity 78% vs 70%, obese/overweight 56% vs 42%). CONCLUSIONS: Broad neurologic features were found in 12% patients with PIMS-TS. By 3-month follow-up, half of these surviving children had recovered fully without neurologic impairment. Significantly higher systemic inflammatory markers were identified in children with neurologic involvement and in those who had not recovered fully.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child Behavior Disorders/epidemiology , Child Behavior Disorders/etiology , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/psychology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
2.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211042940, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484251

ABSTRACT

The world is in a hard battle against COVID-19. Endothelial cells are among the most critical targets of SARS-CoV-2. Dysfunction of endothelium leads to vascular injury following by coagulopathies and thrombotic conditions in the vital organs increasing the risk of life-threatening events. Growing evidences revealed that endothelial dysfunction and consequent thrombotic conditions are associated with the severity of outcomes. It is not yet fully clear that these devastating sequels originate directly from the virus or a side effect of virus-induced cytokine storm. Due to endothelial dysfunction, plasma levels of some biomarkers are changed and relevant clinical manifestations appear as well. Stabilization of endothelial integrity and supporting its function are among the promising therapeutic strategies. Other than respiratory, COVID-19 could be called a systemic vascular disease and this aspect should be scrutinized in more detail in order to reduce related mortality. In the present investigation, the effects of COVID-19 on endothelial function and thrombosis formation are discussed. In this regard, critical players, laboratory findings, clinical manifestation, and suggestive therapies are presented.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/virology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/virology , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Signal Transduction , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/physiopathology
3.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 379-385, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483188

ABSTRACT

In 2019 first reports about a new human coronavirus emerged, which causes common cold symptoms as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The virus was identified as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and severe thrombotic events including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and microthrombi emerged as additional symptoms. Heart failure, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and stroke have also been observed. As main mediator of thrombus formation, platelets became one of the key aspects in SARS-CoV-2 research. Platelets may also directly interact with SARS-CoV-2 and have been shown to carry the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Platelets can also facilitate the virus uptake by secretion of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase furin. Cleavage of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein by furin enhances binding capabilities and virus entry into various cell types. In COVID-19 patients, platelet count differs between mild and serious infections. Patients with mild symptoms have a slightly increased platelet count, whereas thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of severe COVID-19 infections. Low platelet count can be attributed to platelet apoptosis and the incorporation of platelets into microthrombi (peripheral consumption) and severe thrombotic events. The observed excessive formation of thrombi is due to hyperactivation of platelets caused by the infection. Various factors have been suggested in the activation of platelets in COVID-19, such as hypoxia, vessel damage, inflammatory factors, NETosis, SARS-CoV-2 interaction, autoimmune reactions, and autocrine activation. COVID-19 does alter chemokine and cytokine plasma concentrations. Platelet chemokine profiles are altered in COVID-19 and contribute to the described chemokine storms observed in severely ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokines/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
5.
J Clin Invest ; 130(11): 6151-6157, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435146

ABSTRACT

Emerging data indicate that complement and neutrophils contribute to the maladaptive immune response that fuels hyperinflammation and thrombotic microangiopathy, thereby increasing coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) mortality. Here, we investigated how complement interacts with the platelet/neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)/thrombin axis, using COVID-19 specimens, cell-based inhibition studies, and NET/human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) cocultures. Increased plasma levels of NETs, tissue factor (TF) activity, and sC5b-9 were detected in patients. Neutrophils of patients yielded high TF expression and released NETs carrying active TF. Treatment of control neutrophils with COVID-19 platelet-rich plasma generated TF-bearing NETs that induced thrombotic activity of HAECs. Thrombin or NETosis inhibition or C5aR1 blockade attenuated platelet-mediated NET-driven thrombogenicity. COVID-19 serum induced complement activation in vitro, consistent with high complement activity in clinical samples. Complement C3 inhibition with compstatin Cp40 disrupted TF expression in neutrophils. In conclusion, we provide a mechanistic basis for a pivotal role of complement and NETs in COVID-19 immunothrombosis. This study supports strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 that exploit complement or NETosis inhibition.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Complement Membrane Attack Complex , Coronavirus Infections , Extracellular Traps , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Thromboplastin , Thrombosis , Aged , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Complement Activation/drug effects , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/immunology , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Peptides, Cyclic/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/blood , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombin/immunology , Thrombin/metabolism , Thromboplastin/immunology , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology
6.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211040110, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430348

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of Covid-19 in December, 2019, scientists worldwide have been committed to developing COVID-19 vaccines. Only when most people have immunity to SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19 can reduce even wholly overcome. So far, nine kinds of COVID-19 vaccines have passed the phase III clinical trials and have approved for use. At the same time, adverse reactions after COVID-19 vaccination have also reported. This paper focuses on the adverse effects of thrombosis and thrombocytopenia caused by the COVID-19 vaccine, especially the adenovirus-vector vaccine from AstraZeneca and Pfizer, and discusses its mechanism and possible countermeasures.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Genetic Vectors , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Vaccination/adverse effects , Antibodies/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombocytopenia/blood , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409707

ABSTRACT

Global data correlate severe vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, further suggesting the presence of a hypercoagulable state in severe COVID-19 patients, which could promote thrombosis in the lungs and in other organs. The feedback loop between COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and vitamin D also involves platelets (PLTs), since vitamin D deficiency stimulates PLT activation and aggregation and increases fibrinolysis and thrombosis. Vitamin D and PLTs share and play specific roles not only in coagulation and thrombosis but also during inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and immune response. Additionally, another 'fil rouge' between vitamin D and PLTs is represented by their role in mineral metabolism and bone health, since vitamin D deficiency, low PLT count, and altered PLT-related parameters are linked to abnormal bone remodeling in certain pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis (OP). Hence, it is possible to speculate that severe COVID-19 patients are characterized by the presence of several predisposing factors to bone fragility and OP that may be monitored to avoid potential complications. Here, we hypothesize different pervasive actions of vitamin D and PLT association in COVID-19, also allowing for potential preliminary information on bone health status during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Osteoporosis/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Bone Remodeling/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Feedback, Physiological , Humans , Osteoporosis/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Count , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
8.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(3): 708-714, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406170

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is associated with a high incidence of venous and arterial thromboembolic events. Currently, there are no clinical or laboratory markers that predict thrombotic risk. Circulating immature platelets are hyper-reactive platelets, which are associated with arterial thrombotic events. The aim of this study was to assess whether the proportion of circulating immature platelets is associated with disease severity in Covid-19 patients. Patients admitted with Covid-19 disease were prospectively assessed. Immature platelet count (IPC) and immature platelet fraction (IPF) were measured at admission and at additional time points during the hospital course using the Sysmex XN-3000 auto-analyzer. A total of 136 consecutive patients with Covid-19 were recruited [mean age 60 ± 19 years, 49% woman, 56 (41%) had mild-moderate disease and 80 (59%) had severe disease at presentation]. The median IPF% was higher in patients with severe compared to mild-moderate disease [5.8 (3.9-8.7) vs. 4.2 (2.73-6.45), respectively, p = 0.01]. The maximal IPC value was also higher in patients with severe disease [15 (10.03-21.56), vs 10.9 (IQR 6.79-15.62), respectively, p = 0.001]. Increased IPC was associated with increased length of hospital stay. Patients with severe Covid-19 have higher levels of IPF than patients with mild-moderate disease. IPF may serve as a prognostic marker for disease severity in Covid-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/virology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission , Platelet Count , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Time Factors
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716361, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399137

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pathology is associated with exuberant inflammation, vascular damage, and activation of coagulation. In addition, complement activation has been described and is linked to disease pathology. However, few studies have been conducted in cancer patients. Objective: This study examined complement activation in response to COVID-19 in the setting of cancer associated thromboinflammation. Methods: Markers of complement activation (C3a, C5a, sC5b-9) and complement inhibitors (Factor H, C1-Inhibitor) were evaluated in plasma of cancer patients with (n=43) and without (n=43) COVID-19 and stratified based on elevated plasma D-dimer levels (>1.0 µg/ml FEU). Markers of vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and platelet activation (ICAM-1, thrombomodulin, P-selectin) as well as systemic inflammation (pentraxin-3, serum amyloid A, soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor) were analyzed to further evaluate the inflammatory response. Results: Increases in circulating markers of endothelial cell dysfunction, platelet activation, and systemic inflammation were noted in cancer patients with COVID-19. In contrast, complement activation increased in cancer patients with COVID-19 and elevated D-dimers. This was accompanied by decreased C1-Inhibitor levels in patients with D-dimers > 5 ug/ml FEU. Conclusion: Complement activation in cancer patients with COVID-19 is significantly increased in the setting of thromboinflammation. These findings support a link between coagulation and complement cascades in the setting of inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Complement Activation/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Complement Inactivating Agents/blood , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombosis/blood , Young Adult
11.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379972

ABSTRACT

There is increasing evidence for a link between inflammation and thrombosis. Following tissue injury, vascular endothelium becomes activated, losing its antithrombotic properties whereas inflammatory mediators build up a prothrombotic environment. Platelets are the first elements to be activated following endothelial damage; they participate in physiological haemostasis, but also in inflammatory and thrombotic events occurring in an injured tissue. While physiological haemostasis develops rapidly to prevent excessive blood loss in the endothelium activated by inflammation, hypoxia or by altered blood flow, thrombosis develops slowly. Activated platelets release the content of their granules, including ATP and ADP released from their dense granules. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1)/CD39 dephosphorylates ATP to ADP and to AMP, which in turn, is hydrolysed to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73). NTPDase1/CD39 has emerged has an important molecule in the vasculature and on platelet surfaces; it limits thrombotic events and contributes to maintain the antithrombotic properties of endothelium. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of platelets as cellular elements interfacing haemostasis and inflammation, with a particular focus on the emerging role of NTPDase1/CD39 in controlling both processes.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/metabolism , Apyrase/metabolism , Inflammation/complications , Thrombosis/complications , Animals , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Nucleotides/metabolism , Platelet Activation , Signal Transduction , Thrombosis/blood
12.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102240, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347578

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To evaluate calculated total plasma osmolality as a marker of outcome prediction, fluid and metabolic balance, thrombotic risk in severe COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Retrospective data of RT-PCR confirmed hospitalized severe COVID-19 patients (total: n = 175 patients, including diabetic subset: n = 102) were analyzed. Clinically applicable cut-offs were derived using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for calculated total osmolality, eGFR, and D-dimer, and their correlations were studied. RESULTS: Among 175 severe COVID-19 patients, a significant association with mortality was seen with respect to calculated total osmolality (p < 0.001), eGFR (p < 0.001), and D-dimer (p < 0.001). In the total cohort, applicable cut-offs based on ROC curve in predicting outcome were, for total osmolality 299 mosm/kg (area under the curve (AUC)-0.773, odds ratio (OR)-1.09), eGFR 61.5 ml/min/m2 (AUC-0.789, OR-0.96), D-dimer 5.13 (AUC-0.814, OR-2.65) respectively. In diabetic subset, the cut-offs for total osmolality were 298 mosm/kg (AUC-0.794, OR-1.12), eGFR 44.9 ml/min/m2 (AUC-0.774, OR-0.96) and D-dimer 1.59 (AUC-0.769, OR-1.52) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Applicable cut-offs for calculated total plasma osmolality, eGFR, and D-dimer predicts clinical outcome in severe COVID-19 with and without diabetes. Correlation studies validated calculated total osmolality as a marker of the combined effect of fluid and metabolic imbalance, compromised renal function and hypercoagulability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Glomerular Filtration Rate/physiology , Plasma/chemistry , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation/physiology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Complications/blood , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/physiopathology , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Osmolar Concentration , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Water-Electrolyte Balance/physiology
13.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(15): 5063-5069, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346861

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia (VITT) is a new syndrome occurring primarily in healthy young adults, with a female predominance, after receiving the first dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. We describe VITT syndrome characterized by severe thrombosis and thrombocytopenia found in our patient, with fatal outcome. CASE REPORT: A 58-year-old man, after 13 days from the first administration of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine (AstraZeneca), presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomitus. Laboratory tests revealed a severe thrombocytopenia, low fibrinogen serum levels and marked increase of D-dimer serum levels. The patient quickly developed a multiple organ failure, till death, three days after the hospital admission. RESULTS: At histology, in the lungs, interalveolar septa appeared thickened with microthrombi in the capillaries and veins. Interalveolar septa appeared thickened and showed vascular proliferation. Thrombi were detected in the capillaries of glomerular tufts. In the hearth, thrombi were observed in veins and capillaries. In the liver, voluminous fibrin thrombi were diffusely observed in the branches of the portal vein. Microthrombi were also found in the vasa vasorum of the wall of abdominal aorta. In the brain, microthrombi were observed in the capillaries of the choroid plexuses. Diffuse hemorrhagic necrosis was observed in the intestinal wall with marked congestion of the venous vessels. CONCLUSIONS: In our patient, the majority of data necessary for a VITT final diagnosis were present: thrombocytopenia and thrombosis in pulmonary, portal, hepatic, renal and mesenteric veins, associated with a marked increase of D-dimer serum levels. The finding of cerebral thrombosis in choroid plexuses, is a new finding in VITT. These features are suggestive for a very aggressive form of VITT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Aorta/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Choroid Plexus/pathology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Ileum/pathology , Kidney/pathology , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/pathology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/blood , Thrombosis/blood
15.
Shock ; 55(3): 316-320, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304005

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has threatened millions of lives worldwide with severe systemic inflammation, organ dysfunction, and thromboembolic disease. Within our institution, many critically ill COVID-19-positive patients suffered major thrombotic events, prompting our clinicians to evaluate hypercoagulability outside of traditional coagulation testing.We determined the prevalence of fibrinolysis shutdown via rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM, Instrumentation Laboratories, Bedford, Mass) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit over a period of 3 weeks. In 25 patients who had a ROTEM test, we found that 11 (44%) met criteria for fibrinolysis shutdown. Eight of 9 (73%) of the VTE patients met criteria for fibrinolysis shutdown.Given the high rate of fibrinolysis shutdown in these patients, our data support using viscoelastic testing to evaluate for the presence of impaired fibrinolysis. This may help identify patient subsets who might benefit from the administration of fibrinolytics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolysis , Intensive Care Units , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Decision-Making , Female , Fibrinolysis/drug effects , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/etiology , Venous Thromboembolism/blood , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
16.
Curr Rheumatol Rep ; 23(8): 65, 2021 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293441

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: COVID-19 patients have a procoagulant state with a high prevalence of thrombotic events. The hypothesis of an involvement of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) has been suggested by several reports. Here, we reviewed 48 studies investigating aPL in COVID-19 patients. RECENT FINDINGS: Prevalence of Lupus Anticoagulant (LA) ranged from 35% to 92% in ICU patients. Anti-cardiolipin (aCL) IgG and IgM were found in up to 52% and up to 40% of patients respectively. Anti-ß2-glycoprotein I (aß2-GPI) IgG and IgM were found in up to 39% and up to 34% of patients respectively. Between 1% and 12% of patients had a triple positive aPL profile. There was a high prevalence of aß2-GPI and aCL IgA isotype. Two cohort studies found few persistent LA but more persistent solid phase assay aPL over time. aPL determination and their potential role is a real challenge for the treatment of this disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Antibodies, Anticardiolipin/immunology , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lupus Coagulation Inhibitor/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology , beta 2-Glycoprotein I/immunology
17.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 224, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) has been declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organisation. Severe disease typically presents with respiratory failure but Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) and a hypercoagulable state can also occur. Early reports suggest that thrombosis may be linked with AKI. We studied the development of AKI and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 taking chronic anticoagulation therapy. METHODS: Electronic records were reviewed for all adult patients admitted to Manchester University Foundation Trust Hospitals between March 10 and April 302,020 with a diagnosis of COVID-19. Patients with end-stage kidney disease were excluded. AKI was classified as per KDIGO criteria. RESULTS: Of the 1032 patients with COVID-19 studied,164 (15.9%) were taking anticoagulant therapy prior to admission. There were similar rates of AKI between those on anticoagulants and those not anticoagulated (23.8% versus 19.7%) with no difference in the severity of AKI or requirement of renal replacement therapy between groups (1.2% versus 3.5%). Risk factors for AKI included hypertension, pre-existing renal disease and male sex. There was a higher mortality in those taking anticoagulant therapy (40.2% versus 30%). Patients taking anticoagulants were less likely to be admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (8.5% versus 17.4%) and to receive mechanical ventilation (42.9% versus 78.1%). CONCLUSION: Patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy did not have a reduced incidence or severity of AKI suggesting that AKI is unlikely to be thrombotic in nature. Therapeutic anticoagulation is currently still under investigation in randomised controlled studies to determine whether it has a potential role in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Thrombophilia , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Preexisting Condition Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Thrombophilia/prevention & control , Thrombophilia/virology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
18.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211025927, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268172

ABSTRACT

With over 600 million coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine doses administered globally, adverse events are constantly monitored. Recently however, reports of thrombosis and thrombocytopenia following vaccination with the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine have emerged. This paper aims to review the available literature and guidelines pertaining to vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) and the proposed guidelines, while offering a potential approach that unifies the available evidence. While the risk of VITT remains extremely low and the benefits outweigh the risks, experimental studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiology behind VITT and possibly decrease the risk of thrombosis and other adverse events occurring. However, treatment should not be delayed in suspected cases, and IV immunoglobulin and non-heparin anticoagulation should be initiated.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/drug therapy , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Antithrombins/therapeutic use , Autoantibodies/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fondaparinux/therapeutic use , Heparin/adverse effects , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/blood , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Thrombosis/pathology
19.
Br J Haematol ; 194(3): 518-529, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266318

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been the most significant health crisis in recent global history. Early studies from Wuhan highlighted COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and a significant association with mortality was soon recognised. As research continues across the world, more evidence is emerging of the cross-talk between the innate immune system, coagulation activation and inflammation. Immunothrombosis has been demonstrated to play a key role in the pathophysiology of severe COVID-19, with extracellular histones and neutrophil extracellular traps detected in the plasma and cardiopulmonary tissues of critically ill patients. Targeting the components of immunothrombosis is becoming an important factor in the treatment of patients with COVID-19 infection. Recent studies report outcomes of intermediate and therapeutic anticoagulation in hospitalised patients with varying severities of COVID-19 disease, including optimal dosing and associated bleeding risks. Immunomodulatory therapies, including corticosteroids and IL-6 receptor antagonists, have been demonstrated to significantly reduce mortality in COVID-19 patients. As the pandemic continues, more studies are required to understand the driving factors and upstream mechanisms for coagulopathy and immunothrombosis in COVID-19, and thus potentially develop more targeted therapies for SARS-CoV-2 infection, both in the acute phase and in those who develop longer-term symptom burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Thrombosis/etiology , Animals , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Management , Humans , Immunogenic Cell Death , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/therapy
20.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(3): 746-753, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263169

ABSTRACT

Patients with Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) have haemostatic dysfunction and are at higher risk of thrombotic complications. Although age is a major risk factor for outcome impairment in COVID-19, its impact on coagulative patterns here is still unclear. We investigated the association of Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) with thrombotic and haemorrhagic events according to different ages in patients admitted for COVID-19. A total of 27 patients with COVID-19-related pneumonia, without need for intensive care unit admission or mechanical ventilation at hospital presentation, and 24 controls with non-COVID-19 pneumonia were prospectively included. ETP levels were measured on admission. Patients were evaluated for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, venous thromboembolism) and bleeding complications [according to Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC) definition] during in-hospital stay. COVID-19 patients had similar ETP levels compared to controls (AUC 93 ± 24% vs 99 ± 21%, p = 0.339). In the COVID-19 cohort, patients with in-hospital MACE showed lower ETP levels on admission vs those without (AUC 86 ± 14% vs 95 ± 27%, p = 0.041), whereas ETP values were comparable in patients with or without bleeding (AUC 82 ± 16% vs 95 ± 26%, p = 0.337). An interaction between age and ETP levels for both MACE and bleeding complications was observed, where a younger age was associated with an inverse relationship between ETP values and adverse event risk (pint 0.018 for MACE and 0.050 for bleeding). Patients with COVID-19 have similar thrombin potential on admission compared to those with non-COVID-19 pneumonia. In younger COVID-19 patients, lower ETP levels were associated with a higher risk of both MACE and bleeding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hemostasis , Hospitalization , Thrombin/metabolism , Thrombosis/etiology , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/mortality , Thrombosis/therapy , Time Factors
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