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1.
QJM ; 114(9): 619-620, 2021 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584068

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) has been associated with coagulation dysfunction which predisposes patients to an increased risk of both venous and arterial thromboembolism, increasing the short-term morbidity and mortality. Current data evidenced that the rate of post-discharge thrombotic events in COVID-19 patients is lower compared to that observed during hospitalization. Rather than 'true thrombotic events', these complications seem more probably 'immunothrombosis' consequent to the recent infection. Unfortunately, the absence of data from randomized controlled trials, large prospective cohorts and ambulatory COVID-19 patients, left unresolved the question regarding the need of post-discharge thromboprophylaxis due to the absence of strong-level recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Venous Thromboembolism , Aftercare , Anticoagulants , Humans , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Thrombosis/etiology
3.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211069082, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The association between coronavirus infection 2019 (COVID-19) and thrombosis has been explicitly shown through numerous reports that demonstrate high rates of thrombotic complications in infected patients. Recently, much evidence has shown that patients who survived COVID-19 might have a high thrombotic risk after hospital discharge. This current systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to better understand the incidence of thrombosis, bleeding, and mortality rates among patients discharged after COVID-19 hospitalization. METHODS: Using a search strategy that included terms for postdischarge, thrombosis, and COVID-19, 2 investigators independently searched for published articles indexed in the MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus databases that were published before August 2021. Pooled incidences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the DerSimonian-Laird random-effects model with a double arcsine transformation. RESULTS: Twenty articles were included in the meta-analysis. They provided a total of 19 461 patients discharged after COVID-19 hospitalization. The weighted pooled incidence of overall thrombosis among the patients was 1.3% (95 CI, 0. 6-2; I2 90.5), with a pooled incidence of venous thrombosis of 0.7% (95 CI, 0. 4-1; I2 73.9) and a pooled incidence of arterial thrombosis of 0.6% (95 CI, 0. 2-1; I2 88.1). The weighted pooled incidences of bleeding and mortality were 0.9% (95 CI, 0. 1-1.9; I2 95.1) and 2.8% (95 CI, 0. 6-5; I2 98.2), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The incidences of thrombosis and bleeding in patients discharged after COVID-19 hospitalization are comparable to those of medically ill patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hemorrhage/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hemorrhage/physiopathology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/physiopathology
4.
Front Immunol ; 12: 729251, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573871

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The World Health Organization declared the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on March 11, 2020. Two vaccine types were developed using two different technologies: viral vectors and mRNA. Thrombosis is one of the most severe and atypical adverse effects of vaccines. This study aimed to analyze published cases of thrombosis after COVID-19 vaccinations to identify patients' features, potential pathophysiological mechanisms, timing of appearance of the adverse events, and other critical issues. Materials and Methods: We performed a systematic electronic search of scientific articles regarding COVID-19 vaccine-related thrombosis and its complications on the PubMed (MEDLINE) database and through manual searches. We selected 10 out of 50 articles from February 1 to May 5, 2021 and performed a descriptive analysis of the adverse events caused by the mRNA-based Pfizer and Moderna vaccines and the adenovirus-based AstraZeneca vaccine. Results: In the articles on the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, the sample consisted of three male patients with age heterogeneity. The time from vaccination to admission was ≤3 days in all cases; all patients presented signs of petechiae/purpura at admission, with a low platelet count. In the studies on the AstraZeneca vaccine, the sample consisted of 58 individuals with a high age heterogeneity and a high female prevalence. Symptoms appeared around the ninth day, and headache was the most common symptom. The platelet count was below the lower limit of the normal range. All patients except one were positive for PF4 antibodies. The cerebral venous sinus was the most affected site. Death was the most prevalent outcome in all studies, except for one study in which most of the patients remained alive. Discussion: Vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is an unknown nosological phenomenon secondary to inoculation with the COVID-19 vaccine. Several hypotheses have been formulated regarding its physiopathological mechanism. Recent studies have assumed a mechanism that is assimilable to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, with protagonist antibodies against the PF4-polyanion complex. Viral DNA has a negative charge and can bind to PF4, causing VITT. New experimental studies have assumed that thrombosis is related to a soluble adenoviral protein spike variant, originating from splicing events, which cause important endothelial inflammatory events, and binding to endothelial cells expressing ACE2. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to better identify VITT's pathophysiological mechanisms and genetic, demographic, or clinical predisposition of high-risk patients, to investigate the correlation of VITT with the different vaccine types, and to test the significance of the findings.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombosis/epidemiology , /adverse effects , Antigen-Antibody Complex/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebral Veins/metabolism , Cerebral Veins/pathology , Female , Headache , Humans , Mass Vaccination , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Sex Factors , Survival Analysis , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/mortality
5.
Nagoya J Med Sci ; 83(4): 883-891, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562255

ABSTRACT

A 76-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room of Nagano Municipal Hospital with the complain of severe back pain. Chest and abdominal enhanced computed tomography scans showed bilateral adrenal infarction and minute pulmonary nodules, but she had no respiratory symptoms. After admission, a family member of the patient was found to have been in close contact with a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patient. Thus, polymerase chain reaction and antigen tests of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 were conducted, and both tests returned positive. D-dimer levels were normal on admission but increased 2 days thereafter. Anticoagulation therapy and steroid replacement were started, and the patient improved over about two weeks. One month after the onset of adrenal infarction, a rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone loading test was conducted, which revealed that the primary adrenal insufficiency due to adrenal infarction might have been caused by the COVID-19 infection. This case was rare and suggestive of adrenal infarction with COVID-19, which usually presents at the severe stage. In patients with COVID-19, attention should be paid to the onset of thrombosis, even with mild respiratory infection. We also suggest that patients with thrombosis should be suspected of having COVID-19 even in the absence of respiratory infectious symptoms in a situation of COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Glands/blood supply , COVID-19/complications , Infarction , Thrombosis/etiology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Female , Humans , Infarction/etiology , Respiratory Tract Infections , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
7.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(4)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a severe immune-mediated disorder. We aim to report the neurologic features of children with PIMS-TS. METHODS: We identified children presenting to a large children's hospital with PIMS-TS from March to June 2020 and performed a retrospective medical note review, identifying clinical and investigative features alongside short-term outcome of children presenting with neurologic symptoms. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients with PIMS-TS were identified, 9 (12%) had neurologic involvement: altered conciseness (3), behavioral changes (3), focal neurology deficits (2), persistent headaches (2), hallucinations (2), excessive sleepiness (1), and new-onset focal seizures (1). Four patients had cranial images abnormalities. At 3-month follow-up, 1 child had died, 1 had hemiparesis, 3 had behavioral changes, and 4 completely recovered. Systemic inflammatory and prothrombotic markers were higher in patients with neurologic involvement (mean highest CRP 267 vs 202 mg/L, p = 0.05; procalcitonin 30.65 vs 13.11 µg/L, p = 0.04; fibrinogen 7.04 vs 6.17 g/L, p = 0.07; d-dimers 19.68 vs 7.35 mg/L, p = 0.005). Among patients with neurologic involvement, these markers were higher in those without full recovery at 3 months (ferritin 2284 vs 283 µg/L, p = 0.05; d-dimers 30.34 vs 6.37 mg/L, p = 0.04). Patients with and without neurologic involvement shared similar risk factors for PIMS-TS (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic ethnicity 78% vs 70%, obese/overweight 56% vs 42%). CONCLUSIONS: Broad neurologic features were found in 12% patients with PIMS-TS. By 3-month follow-up, half of these surviving children had recovered fully without neurologic impairment. Significantly higher systemic inflammatory markers were identified in children with neurologic involvement and in those who had not recovered fully.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child Behavior Disorders/epidemiology , Child Behavior Disorders/etiology , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/psychology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512382

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic with a great impact on social and economic activities, as well as public health. In most patients, the symptoms of COVID-19 are a high-grade fever and a dry cough, and spontaneously resolve within ten days. However, in severe cases, COVID-19 leads to atypical bilateral interstitial pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and systemic thromboembolism, resulting in multiple organ failure with high mortality and morbidity. SARS-CoV-2 has immune evasion mechanisms, including inhibition of interferon signaling and suppression of T cell and B cell responses. SARS-CoV-2 infection directly and indirectly causes dysregulated immune responses, platelet hyperactivation, and endothelial dysfunction, which interact with each other and are exacerbated by cardiovascular risk factors. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the pathogenic basis of thromboinflammation and endothelial injury in COVID-19. We highlight the distinct contributions of dysregulated immune responses, platelet hyperactivation, and endothelial dysfunction to the pathogenesis of COVID-19. In addition, we discuss potential therapeutic strategies targeting these mechanisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Thrombosis/etiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Platelet Activation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Nov 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502441

ABSTRACT

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a pandemic due to the spread of COVID-19 from Wuhan, China, causing high mortality rates all over the world. The related disease, which mainly affects the lungs, is responsible for the onset of Diffuse Alveolar Damage (DAD) and a hypercoagulability state, frequently leading to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and multiorgan failure, particularly in old and severe-critically ill patients. In order to find effective therapeutic strategies, many efforts have been made aiming to shed light on the pathophysiology of COVID-19 disease. Moreover, following the late advent of vaccination campaigns, the need for the comprehension of the pathophysiology of the fatal, although rare, thrombotic adverse events has become mandatory as well. The achievement of such purposes needs a multidisciplinary approach, depending on a correct interpretation of clinical, biochemical, biomolecular, and forensic findings. In this scenario, autopsies have helped in defining, on both gross and histologic examinations, the main changes to which the affected organs undergo and the role in assessing whether a patient is dead "from" or "with" COVID-19, not to mention whether the existence of a causal link exists between vaccination and thrombotic adverse events. In the present work, we explored the role of postmortem immunohistochemistry, and the increasingly used ancillary technique, in helping to understand the mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of both COVID-19 disease and COVID-19 vaccine-related adverse and rare effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/pathology , Thrombosis/etiology , Autopsy , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cytokines/metabolism , Endothelium/metabolism , Endothelium/pathology , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502439

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus, known as severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) or coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is causing a global pandemic. The virus primarily affects the upper and lower respiratory tracts and raises the risk of a variety of non-pulmonary consequences, the most severe and possibly fatal of which are cardiovascular problems. Data show that almost one-third of the patients with a moderate or severe form of COVID-19 had preexisting cardiovascular comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, hypertension, heart failure, or coronary artery disease. SARS-CoV2 causes hyper inflammation, hypoxia, apoptosis, and a renin-angiotensin system imbalance in a variety of cell types, primarily endothelial cells. Profound endothelial dysfunction associated with COVID-19 can be the cause of impaired organ perfusion that may generate acute myocardial injury, renal failure, and a procoagulant state resulting in thromboembolic events. We discuss the most recent results on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 in patients with cardiometabolic diseases in this review. We also provide insights on treatments that may reduce the severity of this viral infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Endothelial Cells/cytology , Endothelial Cells/virology , Heart Failure/etiology , Humans , Renal Insufficiency/etiology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis/etiology
12.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211048815, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484252

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A new clinical syndrome has been recognized following the COVID-19 vaccine, termed thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The following systematic review focuses on extrapolating thrombotic risk factors, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of patients diagnosed with TTS following the COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: We utilized the World Health Organization's criteria for a confirmed and probable case of TTS following COVID-19 vaccination and conducted a systematic review and posthoc analysis using the PRISMA 2020 statement. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS V25 for factors associated with mortality, including age, gender, anti-PF4/heparin antibodies, platelet nadir, D-dimer peak, time to event diagnosis, arterial or venous thrombi. RESULTS: Of the 175 studies identified, a total of 25 studies with 69 patients were included in this systematic review and post hoc analysis. Platelet nadir (P < .001), arterial or venous thrombi (χ2 = 41.911, P = .05), and chronic medical conditions (χ2 = 25.507, P = .041) were statistically associated with death. The ROC curve analysis yielded D-dimer (AUC = .646) and platelet nadir (AUC = .604) as excellent models for death prediction. CONCLUSION: Adenoviral COVID-19 vaccines have been shown to trigger TTS, however, reports of patients having received mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are also present. Healthcare providers are recommended to maintain a high degree of suspicion among individuals who have received the COVID-19 vaccine within the last 4 weeks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 7702863, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484107

ABSTRACT

People who receive the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine, particularly perimenopausal women who are on birth control or postmenopausal women who take estrogen supplements, may experience thrombosis and thrombocytopenia. Estrogen and the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine both have the potential to cause thrombus in different ways. Some postmenopausal women who are also taking estrogens may develop thrombosis and thrombocytopenia after receiving the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine. Therefore, women are encouraged to stop taking drugs containing estrogen before receiving this vaccine. Furthermore, consuming fish oil can help reduce the risk of developing blood clots among women who are in the luteal phase and, thus, have high estrogen levels. In addition, ChAdOx1 nCoV-19's side effects in young women could be mitigated by administering it during the follicular phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Estrogens/administration & dosage , Thrombosis/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Menopause , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombocytopenia/etiology
14.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 379-385, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483188

ABSTRACT

In 2019 first reports about a new human coronavirus emerged, which causes common cold symptoms as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The virus was identified as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and severe thrombotic events including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and microthrombi emerged as additional symptoms. Heart failure, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and stroke have also been observed. As main mediator of thrombus formation, platelets became one of the key aspects in SARS-CoV-2 research. Platelets may also directly interact with SARS-CoV-2 and have been shown to carry the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Platelets can also facilitate the virus uptake by secretion of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase furin. Cleavage of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein by furin enhances binding capabilities and virus entry into various cell types. In COVID-19 patients, platelet count differs between mild and serious infections. Patients with mild symptoms have a slightly increased platelet count, whereas thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of severe COVID-19 infections. Low platelet count can be attributed to platelet apoptosis and the incorporation of platelets into microthrombi (peripheral consumption) and severe thrombotic events. The observed excessive formation of thrombi is due to hyperactivation of platelets caused by the infection. Various factors have been suggested in the activation of platelets in COVID-19, such as hypoxia, vessel damage, inflammatory factors, NETosis, SARS-CoV-2 interaction, autoimmune reactions, and autocrine activation. COVID-19 does alter chemokine and cytokine plasma concentrations. Platelet chemokine profiles are altered in COVID-19 and contribute to the described chemokine storms observed in severely ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokines/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
15.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477931

ABSTRACT

Several recent reports have highlighted the onset of vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopaenia (VITT) in some recipients (approximately 1 case out of 100k exposures) of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine (AstraZeneca). Although the underlying events leading to this blood-clotting phenomenon has yet to be elucidated, several critical observations present a compelling potential mechanism. Thrombus formation requires the von Willebrand (VWF) protein to be in ultra-large multimeric state. The conservation of this state is controlled by the ADAMTS13 enzyme, whose proteolytic activity reduces the size of VWF multimers, keeping blood clotting at bay. However, ADAMTS13 cannot act on VWF that is bound to platelet factor 4 (PF4). As such, it is of particular interest to note that a common feature between subjects presenting with VITT is high titres of antibodies against PF4. This raises the possibility that these antibodies preserve the stability of ultra-large VWF complexes, leading to the formation of endothelium-anchored VWF strings, which are capable of recruiting circulating platelets and causing uncontrolled thrombosis in terminal capillaries. Here, we share our viewpoint about the current understanding of the VITT pathogenesis involving the prevention of ADAMTS13's activity on VWF by PF4 antibody-mediated stabilisation/ protection of the PF4-VWF complex.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein/metabolism , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Antibodies , Autoantibodies/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Humans , Platelet Factor 4/metabolism , Polymorphism, Genetic , Protein Domains , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457948

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has resulted in a global pandemic with worldwide 6-digit infection rates and thousands of death tolls daily. Enormous efforts are undertaken to achieve high coverage of immunization to reach herd immunity in order to stop the spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Several SARS-CoV-2 vaccines based on mRNA, viral vectors, or inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virus have been approved and are being applied worldwide. However, the recent increased numbers of normally very rare types of thromboses associated with thrombocytopenia have been reported, particularly in the context of the adenoviral vector vaccine ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 from Astra Zeneca. The statistical prevalence of these side effects seems to correlate with this particular vaccine type, i.e., adenoviral vector-based vaccines, but the exact molecular mechanisms are still not clear. The present review summarizes current data and hypotheses for molecular and cellular mechanisms into one integrated hypothesis indicating that coagulopathies, including thromboses, thrombocytopenia, and other related side effects, are correlated to an interplay of the two components in the vaccine, i.e., the spike antigen and the adenoviral vector, with the innate and immune systems, which under certain circumstances can imitate the picture of a limited COVID-19 pathological picture.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Adenoviridae/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Genetic Vectors/adverse effects , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Humans , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/adverse effects , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vaccination/adverse effects
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 752612, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456293

ABSTRACT

Background: Lymphopenia and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio may have prognostic value in COVID-19 severity. Objective: We investigated neutrophil subsets and functions in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of COVID-19 patients on the basis of patients' clinical characteristics. Methods: We used a multiparametric cytometry profiling based to mature and immature neutrophil markers in 146 critical or severe COVID-19 patients. Results: The Discovery study (38 patients, first pandemic wave) showed that 80% of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients develop strong myelemia with CD10-CD64+ immature neutrophils (ImNs). Cellular profiling revealed three distinct neutrophil subsets expressing either the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), the interleukin-3 receptor alpha (CD123), or programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) overrepresented in ICU patients compared to non-ICU patients. The proportion of LOX-1- or CD123-expressing ImNs is positively correlated with clinical severity, cytokine storm (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and thrombosis. BALs of patients with ARDS were highly enriched in LOX-1-expressing ImN subsets and in antimicrobial neutrophil factors. A validation study (118 patients, second pandemic wave) confirmed and strengthened the association of the proportion of ImN subsets with disease severity, invasive ventilation, and death. Only high proportions of LOX-1-expressing ImNs remained strongly associated with a high risk of severe thrombosis independently of the plasma antimicrobial neutrophil factors, suggesting an independent association of ImN markers with their functions. Conclusion: LOX-1-expressing ImNs may help identifying COVID-19 patients at high risk of severity and thrombosis complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/immunology , Scavenger Receptors, Class E/genetics , Thrombosis/etiology , Adult , Aged , B7-H1 Antigen/genetics , B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Interleukin-3 Receptor alpha Subunit/genetics , Interleukin-3 Receptor alpha Subunit/immunology , Interleukin-8/genetics , Interleukin-8/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Scavenger Receptors, Class E/immunology , Thrombosis/genetics , Thrombosis/immunology
19.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258236, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448583

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: All healthcare workers (HCWs) in Yongin Severance Hospital were allocated to receive the ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccine according to national policy. A report of thrombosis and thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS) associated with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 led to hesitancy about receiving the second dose among HCWs who had received the first dose. METHODS: From 7 to 14 May, 2021, we performed a survey to identify the factors associated with hesitancy about receiving the second vaccine dose among HCWs at the hospital who had received the first dose of the vaccine. Based on survey results, a hospital-wide campaign was implemented on 18 May 2021 to improve vaccine coverage. HCWs who completed the second dose completed a self-administered questionnaire to evaluate the effect of the campaign. FINDINGS: Of 1,171 HCWs who had received the first dose of the vaccine, 71.5% completed the online survey, of whom 3.7% refused to take the second dose and 22.3% showed hesitancy. Hesitancy to receive a second dose was significantly associated with age under 30 years and concerns about TTS, and was less common among those who trusted effectiveness and safety of the vaccine. Among HCWs who received the first dose, 96.2% completed vaccination with the second dose between 27 May and 4 June, 2021. Of those who answered the questionnaire asked about the timing of their decision to receive the second dose, 57.1% reported that they were motivated by the hospital-wide campaign. CONCLUSION: A tailored intervention strategy based on a survey can improve COVID-19 vaccination uptake among HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Health Policy , Hospitals , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology
20.
In Vivo ; 35(5): 2951-2955, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436484

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: We present the case of a 19-year-old male patient diagnosed concomitantly with extensive thromboses (including two intra-cardiac masses and Budd-Chiari syndrome), as well as acute myeloid leukemia. This necessitated prompt deployment of a monitoring and treatment strategy which included twice-daily blood count assessment, multiple platelet transfusions and anti-coagulation therapy with dose-adjustment per blood count during both induction and consolidation chemotherapy. Multiple factors are believed to contribute to the development of thrombosis in acute leukemia such as diffuse intravascular coagulation, cytokine release and chemotherapy. CASE REPORT: Our patient presented early on in the COVID-19 pandemic, delaying his seeking out medical treatment and we suspect this to have contributed to his 'catastrophic' thrombotic presentation. Well-structured guidelines to help clinicians manage these patients are lacking, and most data are from retrospective analyses or case reports. Our patient continued full-dose anticoagulant therapy until successfully undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant. The thrombi eventually diminished in size, and the patient was not diagnosed with any further thrombotic events. CONCLUSION: Our case highlights the feasibility of intensive monitoring and provision of platelet transfusion as necessary in order to safely administer low molecular weight heparin from the outset of chemotherapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute , Thrombosis , Adult , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/complications , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/diagnosis , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/etiology , Young Adult
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