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1.
J Biomed Sci ; 29(1): 52, 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1928188

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus-induced disease 19 (COVID-19) infects more than three hundred and sixty million patients worldwide, and people with severe symptoms frequently die of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent studies indicated that excessive neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contributed to immunothrombosis, thereby leading to extensive intravascular coagulopathy and multiple organ dysfunction. Thus, understanding the mechanism of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced NET formation would be helpful to reduce thrombosis and prevent ARDS in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. METHODS: We incubated SARS-CoV-2 with neutrophils in the presence or absence of platelets to observe NET formation. We further isolated extracellular vesicles from COVID-19 patients' sera (COVID-19-EVs) to examine their ability to induce NET formation. RESULTS: We demonstrated that antagonistic mAbs against anti-CLEC5A mAb and anti-TLR2 mAb can inhibit COVID-19-EVs-induced NET formation, and generated clec5a-/-/tlr2-/- mice to confirm the critical roles of CLEC5A and TLR2 in SARS-CoV-2-induced lung inflammation in vivo. We found that virus-free extracellular COVID-19 EVs induced robust NET formation via Syk-coupled C-type lectin member 5A (CLEC5A) and TLR2. Blockade of CLEC5A inhibited COVID-19 EVs-induced NETosis, and simultaneous blockade of CLEC5A and TLR2 further suppressed SARS-CoV-2-induced NETosis in vitro. Moreover, thromboinflammation was attenuated dramatically in clec5a-/-/tlr2-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that SARS-CoV-2-activated platelets produce EVs to enhance thromboinflammation via CLEC5A and TLR2, and highlight the importance of CLEC5A and TLR2 as therapeutic targets to reduce the risk of ARDS in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lectins, C-Type , Neutrophils , Pneumonia , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis , Animals , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Lectins, C-Type/immunology , Mice , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/virology , Receptors, Cell Surface , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology , Toll-Like Receptor 2/immunology
2.
Crit Care Med ; 50(1): e80-e86, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574590

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia is an unexpected consequence of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic era. We reviewed the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare side effect. DATA SOURCES: Online search of published medical literature through PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar using the terms "COVID-19," "vaccine," "thrombosis" was performed. STUDY SELECTION: Articles were chosen for inclusion based on their relevance to coronavirus disease 2019, vaccine, and thrombosis. DATA SYNTHESIS: Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia manifests most often as unusual thromboses (cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, splanchnic vein thrombosis) but sometimes also "usual" thromboses (arterial stroke, pulmonary embolism, deep-vein thrombosis), with oftentimes severe thrombocytopenia, that becomes clinically evident 5-30 days after adenovirus-vectored coronavirus disease 2019 vaccine administration. Most patients have disseminated intravascular coagulation. These features are the result of vaccine-triggered formation of anti-platelet factor 4 immunoglobulin G that activate platelets, clinically mimicking autoimmune heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Early recognition based on thrombosis (sometimes, hemorrhage), thrombocytopenia, and d-dimer elevation within the day 5-30 postvaccine "window" is important given treatment with high-dose IV immunoglobulin plus nonheparin anticoagulation. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia is a serious complication of vaccination that is not feasible to anticipate or prevent. When the patient presents with sustained headache, neurologic symptoms/signs, abdominal pain, dyspnea, or limb pain/swelling beginning 5-30 days post vaccination, platelet count and d-dimer must be measured, and imaging for thrombosis performed. Confirmation of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia diagnosis should be ordered (platelet factor 4/polyanion enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; platelet factor 4-enhanced platelet activation testing) as treatment is initiated (nonheparin anticoagulation, IV immunoglobulin).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Age Factors , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 775168, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555043

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is characterized by virus-induced injury leading to multi-organ failure, together with inflammatory reaction, endothelial cell (EC) injury, and prothrombotic coagulopathy with thrombotic events. Complement system (C) via its cross-talk with the contact and coagulation systems contributes significantly to the severity and pathological consequences due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. These immunopathological mechanisms overlap in COVID-19 and pre-eclampsia (PE). Thus, mothers contracting SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy are more vulnerable to developing PE. SARS-CoV-2 infection of ECs, via its receptor ACE2 and co-receptor TMPRSS2, can provoke endothelial dysfunction and disruption of vascular integrity, causing hyperinflammation and hypercoagulability. This is aggravated by bradykinin increase due to inhibition of ACE2 activity by the virus. C is important for the progression of normal pregnancy, and its dysregulation can impact in the form of PE-like syndrome as a consequence of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Thus, there is also an overlap between treatment regimens of COVID-19 and PE. C inhibitors, especially those targeting C3 or MASP-2, are exciting options for treating COVID-19 and consequent PE. In this review, we examine the role of C, contact and coagulation systems as well as endothelial hyperactivation with respect to SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy and likely development of PE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Complement System Proteins/immunology , Pre-Eclampsia/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Complement Inactivator Proteins/therapeutic use , Endothelium/immunology , Female , Humans , Pre-Eclampsia/physiopathology , Pre-Eclampsia/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/immunology
4.
OMICS ; 25(12): 770-781, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528153

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a systemic disease affecting not only the lungs but also multiple organ systems. Clinical studies implicate that SARS-CoV-2 infection causes imbalance of cellular homeostasis and immune response that trigger cytokine storm, oxidative stress, thrombosis, and insulin resistance. Mathematical modeling can offer in-depth understanding of the SARS-CoV-2 infection and illuminate how subcellular mechanisms and feedback loops underpin disease progression and multiorgan failure. We report here a mathematical model of SARS-CoV-2 infection pathway network with cytokine storm, oxidative stress, thrombosis, insulin resistance, and nitric oxide (NO) pathways. The biochemical systems theory model shows autocrine loops with positive feedback enabling excessive immune response, cytokines, transcription factors, and interferons, which can imbalance homeostasis of the system. The simulations suggest that changes in immune response led to uncontrolled release of cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin (IL)-1ß, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and affect insulin, coagulation, and NO signaling pathways. Increased production of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps), thrombin, PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1), and other procoagulant factors led to thrombosis. By analyzing complex biochemical reactions, this model forecasts the key intermediates, potential biomarkers, and risk factors at different stages of COVID-19. These insights can be useful for drug discovery and development, as well as precision treatment of multiorgan implications of COVID-19 as seen in systems medicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Insulin Resistance/immunology , Nitric Oxide/immunology , Oxidative Stress/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Signal Transduction/immunology , Thrombosis/virology
5.
Hepatol Commun ; 6(2): 255-269, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525435

ABSTRACT

Liver injury, characterized predominantly by elevated aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, is a common feature of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Additionally, SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with acute-on-chronic liver failure in patients with cirrhosis and has a notably elevated mortality in patients with alcohol-related liver disease compared to other etiologies. Direct viral infection of the liver with SARS-CoV-2 remains controversial, and alternative pathophysiologic explanations for its hepatic effects are an area of active investigation. In this review, we discuss the effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the inflammatory environment it creates on endothelial cells and platelets more generally and then with a hepatic focus. In doing this, we present vascular inflammation and thrombosis as a potential mechanism of liver injury and liver-related complications in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelet Disorders/virology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Inflammation/virology , Liver Diseases/virology , Thrombosis/virology , Blood Platelet Disorders/immunology , Blood Platelet Disorders/physiopathology , COVID-19/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/physiopathology , Liver Diseases/immunology , Liver Diseases/physiopathology , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/physiopathology
6.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(2): 316-326, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493288

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism, occlusion of dialysis catheters, circuit thrombosis in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) devices, acute limb ischemia, and isolated strokes, all in the face of prophylactic and even therapeutic anticoagulation, are features of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) coagulopathy. It seems well established at this time that a COVID-19 patient deemed sick enough to be hospitalized, should receive at least prophylactic dose anticoagulation. However, should some hospitalized patients have dosage escalation to intermediate dose? Should some be considered for full-dose anticoagulation without a measurable thromboembolic event and how should that anticoagulation be monitored? Should patients receive postdischarge anticoagulation and with what medication and for how long? What thrombotic issues are related to the various medications being used to treat this coagulopathy? Is antiphospholipid antibody part of this syndrome? What is the significance of isolated ischemic stroke and limb ischemia in this disorder and how does this interface with the rest of the clinical and laboratory features of this disorder? The aims of this article are to explore these questions and interpret the available data based on the current evidence.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Ambulatory Care , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Combinations , Duration of Therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/immunology , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/immunology
7.
Blood ; 138(16): 1481-1489, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484294

ABSTRACT

A subset of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) become critically ill, suffering from severe respiratory problems and also increased rates of thrombosis. The causes of thrombosis in severely ill patients with COVID-19 are still emerging, but the coincidence of critical illness with the timing of the onset of adaptive immunity could implicate an excessive immune response. We hypothesized that platelets might be susceptible to activation by anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (anti-SARS-CoV-2) antibodies and might contribute to thrombosis. We found that immune complexes containing recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and anti-spike immunoglobulin G enhanced platelet-mediated thrombosis on von Willebrand factor in vitro, but only when the glycosylation state of the Fc domain was modified to correspond with the aberrant glycosylation previously identified in patients with severe COVID-19. Furthermore, we found that activation was dependent on FcγRIIA, and we provide in vitro evidence that this pathogenic platelet activation can be counteracted by the therapeutic small molecules R406 (fostamatinib) and ibrutinib, which inhibit tyrosine kinases Syk and Btk, respectively, or by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thrombosis/pathology , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigen-Antibody Complex/immunology , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Glycosylation , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology , von Willebrand Factor/genetics
8.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458477

ABSTRACT

The enlightenment of the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as a part of the innate immune system shed new insights into the pathologies of various diseases. The initial idea that NETs are a pivotal defense structure was gradually amended due to several deleterious effects in consecutive investigations. NETs formation is now considered a double-edged sword. The harmful effects are not limited to the induction of inflammation by NETs remnants but also include occlusions caused by aggregated NETs (aggNETs). The latter carries the risk of occluding tubular structures like vessels or ducts and appear to be associated with the pathologies of various diseases. In addition to life-threatening vascular clogging, other occlusions include painful stone formation in the biliary system, the kidneys, the prostate, and the appendix. AggNETs are also prone to occlude the ductal system of exocrine glands, as seen in ocular glands, salivary glands, and others. Last, but not least, they also clog the pancreatic ducts in a murine model of neutrophilia. In this regard, elucidating the mechanism of NETs-dependent occlusions is of crucial importance for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to address the putative mechanisms of NETs-associated occlusions in the pathogenesis of disease, as well as prospective treatment modalities.


Subject(s)
Embolism/immunology , Extracellular Traps/physiology , Thrombosis/immunology , Animals , Body Fluids/immunology , Body Fluids/physiology , Embolism/physiopathology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Neutrophils/immunology , Prospective Studies , Thrombosis/physiopathology
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457948

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has resulted in a global pandemic with worldwide 6-digit infection rates and thousands of death tolls daily. Enormous efforts are undertaken to achieve high coverage of immunization to reach herd immunity in order to stop the spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Several SARS-CoV-2 vaccines based on mRNA, viral vectors, or inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virus have been approved and are being applied worldwide. However, the recent increased numbers of normally very rare types of thromboses associated with thrombocytopenia have been reported, particularly in the context of the adenoviral vector vaccine ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 from Astra Zeneca. The statistical prevalence of these side effects seems to correlate with this particular vaccine type, i.e., adenoviral vector-based vaccines, but the exact molecular mechanisms are still not clear. The present review summarizes current data and hypotheses for molecular and cellular mechanisms into one integrated hypothesis indicating that coagulopathies, including thromboses, thrombocytopenia, and other related side effects, are correlated to an interplay of the two components in the vaccine, i.e., the spike antigen and the adenoviral vector, with the innate and immune systems, which under certain circumstances can imitate the picture of a limited COVID-19 pathological picture.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Thrombocytopenia/etiology , Thrombosis/etiology , Adenoviridae/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Genetic Vectors/adverse effects , Genetic Vectors/immunology , Humans , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/etiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/adverse effects , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vaccination/adverse effects
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 752612, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456293

ABSTRACT

Background: Lymphopenia and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio may have prognostic value in COVID-19 severity. Objective: We investigated neutrophil subsets and functions in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of COVID-19 patients on the basis of patients' clinical characteristics. Methods: We used a multiparametric cytometry profiling based to mature and immature neutrophil markers in 146 critical or severe COVID-19 patients. Results: The Discovery study (38 patients, first pandemic wave) showed that 80% of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients develop strong myelemia with CD10-CD64+ immature neutrophils (ImNs). Cellular profiling revealed three distinct neutrophil subsets expressing either the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), the interleukin-3 receptor alpha (CD123), or programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) overrepresented in ICU patients compared to non-ICU patients. The proportion of LOX-1- or CD123-expressing ImNs is positively correlated with clinical severity, cytokine storm (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and thrombosis. BALs of patients with ARDS were highly enriched in LOX-1-expressing ImN subsets and in antimicrobial neutrophil factors. A validation study (118 patients, second pandemic wave) confirmed and strengthened the association of the proportion of ImN subsets with disease severity, invasive ventilation, and death. Only high proportions of LOX-1-expressing ImNs remained strongly associated with a high risk of severe thrombosis independently of the plasma antimicrobial neutrophil factors, suggesting an independent association of ImN markers with their functions. Conclusion: LOX-1-expressing ImNs may help identifying COVID-19 patients at high risk of severity and thrombosis complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Neutrophils/immunology , Scavenger Receptors, Class E/genetics , Thrombosis/etiology , Adult , Aged , B7-H1 Antigen/genetics , B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Interleukin-3 Receptor alpha Subunit/genetics , Interleukin-3 Receptor alpha Subunit/immunology , Interleukin-8/genetics , Interleukin-8/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/genetics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Scavenger Receptors, Class E/immunology , Thrombosis/genetics , Thrombosis/immunology
12.
Viruses ; 13(10)2021 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438739

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) commonly complicates with coagulopathy. A syndrome called Long-COVID-19 is emerging recently in COVID-19 survivors, characterized, in addition to the persistence of symptoms typical of the acute phase, by alterations in inflammatory and coagulation parameters due to endothelial damage. The related disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) can be associated with high death rates in COVID-19 patients. It is possible to find a prothrombotic state also in Long-COVID-19. Early administration of anticoagulants in COVID-19 was suggested in order to improve patient outcomes, although exact criteria for their application were not well-established. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) was commonly adopted for counteracting DIC and venous thromboembolism (VTE), due to its pharmacodynamics and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the efficacy of anticoagulant therapy for COVID-19-associated DIC is still a matter of debate. Thrombin and Factor Xa (FXa) are well-known components of the coagulation cascade. The FXa is known to strongly promote inflammation as the consequence of increased cytokine expression. Endothelial cells and mononuclear leucocytes release cytokines, growth factors, and adhesion molecules due to thrombin activation. On the other hand, cytokines can activate coagulation. The cross-talk between coagulation and inflammation is mediated via protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors might become potential targets to be considered for counteracting the clinical expressions of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 is effectively able to activate local and circulating coagulation factors, thus inducing the generation of disseminated coagula. LMWH may be considered as the new frontier in the treatment of COVID-19 and Long-COVID-19. Indeed, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) may be an alternative option for both early and later treatment of COVID-19 patients due to their ability to inhibit PARs. The aim of this report was to evaluate the role of anticoagulants-and DOACs in particular in COVID-19 and Long-COVID-19 patients. We report the case of a COVID-19 patient who, after administration of enoxaparin developed DIC secondary to virosis and positivity for platelet factor 4 (PF4) and a case of Long-COVID with high residual cardiovascular risk and persistence of blood chemistry of inflammation and procoagulative state.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Blood Coagulation/drug effects , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Endothelial Cells , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/immunology
14.
J Clin Invest ; 130(11): 6151-6157, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435146

ABSTRACT

Emerging data indicate that complement and neutrophils contribute to the maladaptive immune response that fuels hyperinflammation and thrombotic microangiopathy, thereby increasing coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) mortality. Here, we investigated how complement interacts with the platelet/neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)/thrombin axis, using COVID-19 specimens, cell-based inhibition studies, and NET/human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) cocultures. Increased plasma levels of NETs, tissue factor (TF) activity, and sC5b-9 were detected in patients. Neutrophils of patients yielded high TF expression and released NETs carrying active TF. Treatment of control neutrophils with COVID-19 platelet-rich plasma generated TF-bearing NETs that induced thrombotic activity of HAECs. Thrombin or NETosis inhibition or C5aR1 blockade attenuated platelet-mediated NET-driven thrombogenicity. COVID-19 serum induced complement activation in vitro, consistent with high complement activity in clinical samples. Complement C3 inhibition with compstatin Cp40 disrupted TF expression in neutrophils. In conclusion, we provide a mechanistic basis for a pivotal role of complement and NETs in COVID-19 immunothrombosis. This study supports strategies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 that exploit complement or NETosis inhibition.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Complement Membrane Attack Complex , Coronavirus Infections , Extracellular Traps , Neutrophils , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Thromboplastin , Thrombosis , Aged , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Complement Activation/drug effects , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/immunology , Complement Membrane Attack Complex/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Extracellular Traps/metabolism , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/immunology , Neutrophils/metabolism , Peptides, Cyclic/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/blood , Receptor, Anaphylatoxin C5a/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombin/immunology , Thrombin/metabolism , Thromboplastin/immunology , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/virology
15.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211040110, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430348

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of Covid-19 in December, 2019, scientists worldwide have been committed to developing COVID-19 vaccines. Only when most people have immunity to SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19 can reduce even wholly overcome. So far, nine kinds of COVID-19 vaccines have passed the phase III clinical trials and have approved for use. At the same time, adverse reactions after COVID-19 vaccination have also reported. This paper focuses on the adverse effects of thrombosis and thrombocytopenia caused by the COVID-19 vaccine, especially the adenovirus-vector vaccine from AstraZeneca and Pfizer, and discusses its mechanism and possible countermeasures.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Genetic Vectors , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Vaccination/adverse effects , Antibodies/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombocytopenia/blood , Thrombocytopenia/immunology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/immunology
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(18)2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409707

ABSTRACT

Global data correlate severe vitamin D deficiency with COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, further suggesting the presence of a hypercoagulable state in severe COVID-19 patients, which could promote thrombosis in the lungs and in other organs. The feedback loop between COVID-19-associated coagulopathy and vitamin D also involves platelets (PLTs), since vitamin D deficiency stimulates PLT activation and aggregation and increases fibrinolysis and thrombosis. Vitamin D and PLTs share and play specific roles not only in coagulation and thrombosis but also during inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and immune response. Additionally, another 'fil rouge' between vitamin D and PLTs is represented by their role in mineral metabolism and bone health, since vitamin D deficiency, low PLT count, and altered PLT-related parameters are linked to abnormal bone remodeling in certain pathological conditions, such as osteoporosis (OP). Hence, it is possible to speculate that severe COVID-19 patients are characterized by the presence of several predisposing factors to bone fragility and OP that may be monitored to avoid potential complications. Here, we hypothesize different pervasive actions of vitamin D and PLT association in COVID-19, also allowing for potential preliminary information on bone health status during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Osteoporosis/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Bone Remodeling/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Feedback, Physiological , Humans , Osteoporosis/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Count , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/blood , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications
17.
Nature ; 599(7884): 283-289, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404888

ABSTRACT

Derailed cytokine and immune cell networks account for the organ damage and the clinical severity of COVID-19 (refs. 1-4). Here we show that SARS-CoV-2, like other viruses, evokes cellular senescence as a primary stress response in infected cells. Virus-induced senescence (VIS) is indistinguishable from other forms of cellular senescence and is accompanied by a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), which comprises pro-inflammatory cytokines, extracellular-matrix-active factors and pro-coagulatory mediators5-7. Patients with COVID-19 displayed markers of senescence in their airway mucosa in situ and increased serum levels of SASP factors. In vitro assays demonstrated macrophage activation with SASP-reminiscent secretion, complement lysis and SASP-amplifying secondary senescence of endothelial cells, which mirrored hallmark features of COVID-19 such as macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, endothelial damage and widespread thrombosis in affected lung tissue1,8,9. Moreover, supernatant from VIS cells, including SARS-CoV-2-induced senescence, induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and activation of platelets and the clotting cascade. Senolytics such as navitoclax and a combination of dasatinib plus quercetin selectively eliminated VIS cells, mitigated COVID-19-reminiscent lung disease and reduced inflammation in SARS-CoV-2-infected hamsters and mice. Our findings mark VIS as a pathogenic trigger of COVID-19-related cytokine escalation and organ damage, and suggest that senolytic targeting of virus-infected cells is a treatment option against SARS-CoV-2 and perhaps other viral infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cellular Senescence/drug effects , Molecular Targeted Therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aniline Compounds/pharmacology , Aniline Compounds/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Cell Line , Cricetinae , Dasatinib/pharmacology , Dasatinib/therapeutic use , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Quercetin/pharmacology , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/therapeutic use , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/immunology , Thrombosis/metabolism
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716361, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399137

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pathology is associated with exuberant inflammation, vascular damage, and activation of coagulation. In addition, complement activation has been described and is linked to disease pathology. However, few studies have been conducted in cancer patients. Objective: This study examined complement activation in response to COVID-19 in the setting of cancer associated thromboinflammation. Methods: Markers of complement activation (C3a, C5a, sC5b-9) and complement inhibitors (Factor H, C1-Inhibitor) were evaluated in plasma of cancer patients with (n=43) and without (n=43) COVID-19 and stratified based on elevated plasma D-dimer levels (>1.0 µg/ml FEU). Markers of vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and platelet activation (ICAM-1, thrombomodulin, P-selectin) as well as systemic inflammation (pentraxin-3, serum amyloid A, soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor) were analyzed to further evaluate the inflammatory response. Results: Increases in circulating markers of endothelial cell dysfunction, platelet activation, and systemic inflammation were noted in cancer patients with COVID-19. In contrast, complement activation increased in cancer patients with COVID-19 and elevated D-dimers. This was accompanied by decreased C1-Inhibitor levels in patients with D-dimers > 5 ug/ml FEU. Conclusion: Complement activation in cancer patients with COVID-19 is significantly increased in the setting of thromboinflammation. These findings support a link between coagulation and complement cascades in the setting of inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Complement Activation/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Complement Inactivating Agents/blood , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/blood , Platelet Activation/immunology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Thrombosis/blood , Young Adult
19.
J Autoimmun ; 121: 102662, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385817

ABSTRACT

Herein, we consider venous immunothrombotic mechanisms in SARS-CoV-2 infection and anti-SARS-CoV-2 DNA vaccination. Primary SARS-CoV-2 infection with systemic viral RNA release (RNAaemia) contributes to innate immune coagulation cascade activation, with both pulmonary and systemic immunothrombosis - including venous territory strokes. However, anti-SARS-CoV-2 adenoviral-vectored-DNA vaccines -initially shown for the ChAdOx1 vaccine-may rarely exhibit autoimmunity with autoantibodies to Platelet Factor-4 (PF4) that is termed Vaccine-Induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia (VITT), an entity pathophysiologically similar to Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT). The PF4 autoantigen is a polyanion molecule capable of independent interactions with negatively charged bacterial cellular wall, heparin and DNA molecules, thus linking intravascular innate immunity to both bacterial cell walls and pathogen-derived DNA. Crucially, negatively charged extracellular DNA is a powerful adjuvant that can break tolerance to positively charged nuclear histone proteins in many experimental autoimmunity settings, including SLE and scleroderma. Analogous to DNA-histone interactons, positively charged PF4-DNA complexes stimulate strong interferon responses via Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 9 engagement. A chain of events following intramuscular adenoviral-vectored-DNA vaccine inoculation including microvascular damage; microbleeding and platelet activation with PF4 release, adenovirus cargo dispersement with DNA-PF4 engagement may rarely break immune tolerance, leading to rare PF4-directed autoimmunity. The VITT cavernous sinus cerebral and intestinal venous territory immunothrombosis proclivity may pertain to venous drainage of shared microbiotal-rich areas of the nose and in intestines that initiates local endovascular venous immunity by PF4/microbiotal engagement with PF4 autoantibody driven immunothrombosis reminiscent of HIT. According to the proposed model, any adenovirus-vectored-DNA vaccine could drive autoimmune VITT in susceptible individuals and alternative mechanism based on molecular mimicry, vaccine protein contaminants, adenovirus vector proteins, EDTA buffers or immunity against the viral spike protein are secondary factors. Hence, electrochemical DNA-PF4 interactions and PF4-heparin interactions, but at different locations, represent the common denominator in HIT and VITT related autoimmune-mediated thrombosis.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Factor 4/immunology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/pathology , Thrombosis/chemically induced , Thrombosis/pathology , Vaccines/immunology
20.
J Leukoc Biol ; 109(1): 35-47, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372745

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has led to hundreds of thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in economic damage. The immune response elicited from this virus is poorly understood. An alarming number of cases have arisen where COVID-19 patients develop complications on top of the symptoms already associated with SARS, such as thrombosis, injuries of vascular system, kidney, and liver, as well as Kawasaki disease. In this review, a bioinformatics approach was used to elucidate the immune response triggered by SARS-CoV-2 infection in primary human lung epithelial and transformed human lung alveolar. Additionally, examined the potential mechanism behind several complications that have been associated with COVID-19 and determined that a specific cytokine storm is leading to excessive neutrophil recruitment. These neutrophils are directly leading to thrombosis, organ damage, and complement activation via neutrophil extracellular trap release.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Thrombosis/immunology , Vascular System Injuries/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/immunology , Humans , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/immunology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/pathology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/virology , Pulmonary Alveoli/immunology , Pulmonary Alveoli/pathology , Pulmonary Alveoli/virology , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/virology , Vascular System Injuries/pathology , Vascular System Injuries/virology
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