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1.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 337, 2021 09 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402050

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has been reported to show a capacity for invading the brains of humans and model animals. However, it remains unclear whether and how SARS-CoV-2 crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Herein, SARS-CoV-2 RNA was occasionally detected in the vascular wall and perivascular space, as well as in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) in the infected K18-hACE2 transgenic mice. Moreover, the permeability of the infected vessel was increased. Furthermore, disintegrity of BBB was discovered in the infected hamsters by administration of Evans blue. Interestingly, the expression of claudin5, ZO-1, occludin and the ultrastructure of tight junctions (TJs) showed unchanged, whereas, the basement membrane was disrupted in the infected animals. Using an in vitro BBB model that comprises primary BMECs with astrocytes, SARS-CoV-2 was found to infect and cross through the BMECs. Consistent with in vivo experiments, the expression of MMP9 was increased and collagen IV was decreased while the markers for TJs were not altered in the SARS-CoV-2-infected BMECs. Besides, inflammatory responses including vasculitis, glial activation, and upregulated inflammatory factors occurred after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Overall, our results provide evidence supporting that SARS-CoV-2 can cross the BBB in a transcellular pathway accompanied with basement membrane disrupted without obvious alteration of TJs.


Subject(s)
Basement Membrane/metabolism , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Tight Junctions/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Basement Membrane/pathology , Basement Membrane/virology , Blood-Brain Barrier/pathology , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/genetics , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tight Junctions/genetics , Tight Junctions/pathology , Tight Junctions/virology , Vero Cells
2.
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol ; 320(6): L1186-L1193, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124630

ABSTRACT

A significant number of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that is associated with a poor outcome. The molecular mechanisms driving failure of the alveolar barrier upon severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection remain incompletely understood. The Na,K-ATPase is an adhesion molecule and a plasma membrane transporter that is critically required for proper alveolar epithelial function by both promoting barrier integrity and resolution of excess alveolar fluid, thus enabling appropriate gas exchange. However, numerous SARS-CoV-2-mediated and COVID-19-related signals directly or indirectly impair the function of the Na,K-ATPase, thereby potentially contributing to disease progression. In this Perspective, we highlight some of the putative mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2-driven dysfunction of the Na,K-ATPase, focusing on expression, maturation, and trafficking of the transporter. A therapeutic mean to selectively inhibit the maladaptive signals that impair the Na,K-ATPase upon SARS-CoV-2 infection might be effective in reestablishing the alveolar epithelial barrier and promoting alveolar fluid clearance and thus advantageous in patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Pulmonary Alveoli/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism , Tight Junctions/pathology , Biological Transport/physiology , Humans , Pulmonary Edema/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Front Immunol ; 11: 596631, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004678

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a distinctive infection characterized by elevated inter-human transmission and presenting from absence of symptoms to severe cytokine storm that can lead to dismal prognosis. Like for HIV, lymphopenia and drastic reduction of CD4+ T cell counts in COVID-19 patients have been linked with poor clinical outcome. As CD4+ T cells play a critical role in orchestrating responses against viral infections, important lessons can be drawn by comparing T cell response in COVID-19 and in HIV infection and by studying HIV-infected patients who became infected by SARS-CoV-2. We critically reviewed host characteristics and hyper-inflammatory response in these two viral infections to have a better insight on the large difference in clinical outcome in persons being infected by SARS-CoV-2. The better understanding of mechanism of T cell dysfunction will contribute to the development of targeted therapy against severe COVID-19 and will help to rationally design vaccine involving T cell response for the long-term control of viral infection.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , HIV Infections/immunology , Lymphopenia/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokines/blood , Dysbiosis/pathology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/physiology , HIV Infections/pathology , Humans , Tight Junctions/pathology
4.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5859, 2020 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933687

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of COVID-19 has become a worldwide pandemic. The pathogenesis of this infectious disease and how it differs from other drivers of pneumonia is unclear. Here we analyze urine samples from COVID-19 infection cases, healthy donors and non-COVID-19 pneumonia cases using quantitative proteomics. The molecular changes suggest that immunosuppression and tight junction impairment occur in the early stage of COVID-19 infection. Further subgrouping of COVID-19 patients into moderate and severe types shows that an activated immune response emerges in severely affected patients. We propose a two-stage mechanism of pathogenesis for this unusual viral infection. Our data advance our understanding of the clinical features of COVID-19 infections and provide a resource for future mechanistic and therapeutics studies.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/urine , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/urine , Disease Progression , Humans , Immune Tolerance , Pandemics , Pneumonia/immunology , Pneumonia/pathology , Pneumonia/urine , Pneumonia, Viral/urine , Proteome/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Tight Junctions/pathology
5.
Front Immunol ; 11: 575047, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895305

ABSTRACT

Reports suggest a role of endothelial dysfunction and loss of endothelial barrier function in COVID-19. It is well established that the endothelial glycocalyx-degrading enzyme heparanase contributes to vascular leakage and inflammation. Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) serve as an inhibitor of heparanase. We hypothesize that heparanase contributes to the pathogenesis of COVID-19, and that heparanase may be inhibited by LMWH. To test this hypothesis, heparanase activity and heparan sulfate levels were measured in plasma of healthy controls (n = 10) and COVID-19 patients (n = 48). Plasma heparanase activity and heparan sulfate levels were significantly elevated in COVID-19 patients. Heparanase activity was associated with disease severity including the need for intensive care, lactate dehydrogenase levels, and creatinine levels. Use of prophylactic LMWH in non-ICU patients was associated with a reduced heparanase activity. Since there is no other clinically applied heparanase inhibitor currently available, therapeutic treatment of COVID-19 patients with low molecular weight heparins should be explored.


Subject(s)
Endothelium/pathology , Glucuronidase/antagonists & inhibitors , Glucuronidase/blood , Heparin Antagonists/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Tight Junctions/pathology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Creatinine/blood , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Glucuronidase/metabolism , Heparitin Sulfate/blood , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Virology ; 552: 43-51, 2021 01 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-843443

ABSTRACT

This study focused on intestinal restitution including phenotype switching of absorptive enterocytes and the abundance of different enterocyte subtypes in weaned pigs after porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection. At 10 days post-PEDV-inoculation, the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in both jejunum and ileum had restored, and the PEDV antigen was not detectable. However, enterocytes at the villus tips revealed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the jejunum in which E-cadherin expression decreased while expression of N-cadherin, vimentin, and Snail increased. Additionally, there was reduced expression of actin in microvilli and Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) in tight junctions. Moreover, the protein concentration of transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1), which mediates EMT and cytoskeleton alteration, was increased. We also found a decreased number of Peyer's patch M cells in the ileum. These results reveal incomplete restitution of enterocytes in the jejunum and potentially impaired immune surveillance in the ileum after PEDV infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Enterocytes/pathology , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/pathology , Peyer's Patches/pathology , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/pathogenicity , Animals , Cadherins/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/immunology , Gastroenteritis, Transmissible, of Swine/virology , Ileum/immunology , Ileum/pathology , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Jejunum/immunology , Jejunum/pathology , Microvilli/pathology , Swine , Tight Junctions/pathology , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Weaning
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