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1.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 76: 285-288, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525691

ABSTRACT

The arterial revascularization procedure is still a challenging issue in Covid-19 associated limb ischemia. Herein we aimed to present a case of a 64 year-old woman with acute ischemic signs in upper extremity who was diagnosed as a probable Covid-19 case incidentally after admission. Although late admission and failed recurrent embolectomies lead to an eventful course, intra-arterial thrombolysis seemed to present a benefitable treatment option for our patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Ischemia/etiology , Upper Extremity/blood supply , Acute Disease , Amputation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Embolectomy , Female , Humans , Ischemia/diagnostic imaging , Ischemia/physiopathology , Ischemia/therapy , Middle Aged , Regional Blood Flow , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
3.
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed ; 106(6): 627-634, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503592

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with delivery room respiratory support in at-risk infants who are initially vigorous and received delayed cord clamping (DCC). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Two perinatal centres in Melbourne, Australia. PATIENTS: At-risk infants born at ≥35+0 weeks gestation with a paediatric doctor in attendance who were initially vigorous and received DCC for >60 s. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Delivery room respiratory support defined as facemask positive pressure ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure and/or supplemental oxygen within 10 min of birth. RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety-eight infants born at a median (IQR) gestational age of 39+3 (38+2-40+2) weeks were included. Cord clamping occurred at a median (IQR) of 128 (123-145) s. Forty-four (15%) infants received respiratory support at a median of 214 (IQR 156-326) s after birth. Neonatal unit admission for respiratory distress occurred in 32% of infants receiving delivery room respiratory support vs 1% of infants who did not receive delivery room respiratory support (p<0.001). Risk factors independently associated with delivery room respiratory support were average heart rate (HR) at 90-120 s after birth (determined using three-lead ECG), mode of birth and time to establish regular cries. Decision tree analysis identified that infants at highest risk had an average HR of <165 beats per minute at 90-120 s after birth following caesarean section (risk of 39%). Infants with an average HR of ≥165 beats per minute at 90-120 s after birth were at low risk (5%). CONCLUSIONS: We present a clinical decision pathway for at-risk infants who may benefit from close observation following DCC. Our findings provide a novel perspective of HR beyond the traditional threshold of 100 beats per minute.


Subject(s)
Critical Pathways/standards , Delivery, Obstetric , Electrocardiography/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Umbilical Cord , Australia/epidemiology , Cesarean Section/adverse effects , Cesarean Section/methods , Clinical Decision-Making , Constriction , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/adverse effects , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Female , Gestational Age , Heart Rate , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/adverse effects , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/instrumentation , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , Time-to-Treatment/standards , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data
4.
Prosthet Orthot Int ; 45(5): 373-377, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501242

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the National Health Service in the United Kingdom (UK). OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the impact of COVID-19 on orthotic services in the United Kingdom. STUDY DESIGN: Cross sectional survey. METHODS: An online survey was distributed to UK orthotists approximately 6 months after the first peak of COVID-19. Descriptive statistics of results related to appointment waiting times, disruption of services, introduction of telehealth appointments, and clinicians' opinions on the impact of COVID-19 was completed. RESULTS: Seventy-seven orthotists completed the survey, with many reporting that their service was closed or open only to inpatients/urgent patients at some point during the pandemic. There were substantial variation in appointment waiting times, time allocated per appointment, and increases in lead times for orthotic products across services. Over 90% reported using telehealth appointments. Results were comparable with previous research showing long appointment waiting times and indicated that the pandemic has added to this issue. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic has had a significant impact on orthotic services with face-to-face appointments largely reserved for urgent patients and inpatients, and services going through stages of closing and reopening, alongside the introduction of telehealth to ensure less urgent patients could continue to access orthotic care. Future service evaluation studies are required to further assess how orthotic services have been affected by the pandemic and the effectiveness of recovery plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Services Accessibility , Orthotic Devices , Telemedicine , Time-to-Treatment , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
Future Oncol ; 17(32): 4233-4235, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484983

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has modified the management of urothelial carcinoma (UC). Eighteen months after the onset of the pandemic, a scoping narrative review was able to state that radical cystectomy for UC should not be delayed beyond 10 weeks when neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) was administered and 12 weeks when it was not. NAC should be considered when imminent chemotherapy cannot be performed. Early cystectomy should not be delayed when indicated for patients with high-risk non-MIBC. Patients with non-MIBC should still receive their induction doses of intravesical instillations. Diagnostic cystoscopy should not be deferred in symptomatic patients. Surgical management of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) allows for a wider deferral interval.


Subject(s)
Cystectomy , Cystoscopy , Time-to-Treatment , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/diagnosis , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Primary Prevention/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Urinary Bladder/pathology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology , Urothelium/pathology
7.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 43(8): 314-315, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483687

ABSTRACT

The interaction of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and chemotherapy may result in worse outcomes. However, there may be more indirect effects of COVID. We report 3 cases in which treatment was delayed because of COVID-related inability or reluctance to travel. Oncology programs should consider such indirect effects when devising treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Osteosarcoma/drug therapy , Retinoblastoma/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Transportation/statistics & numerical data , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols , Bone Neoplasms/drug therapy , Bone Neoplasms/virology , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Osteosarcoma/virology , Prognosis , Retinal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Retinal Neoplasms/virology , Retinoblastoma/virology
8.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e230, 2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483060

ABSTRACT

We conducted a retrospective observational study in patients with laboratory-confirmed coronavirus disease (COVID-19) who received medical care in 688 COVID-19 ambulatory units and hospitals in Mexico City between 24 February 2020 and 24 December 2020, to study if the elderly seek medical care later than younger patients and their severity of symptoms at initial medical evaluation. Patients were categorised into eight groups (<20, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79 and ≥80 years). Symptoms at initial evaluation were classified according to a previously validated classification into respiratory and non-respiratory symptoms. Comparisons between time from symptom onset to medical care for every age category were performed through variance analyses. Logistic regression models were applied to determine the risk of presenting symptoms of severity according to age, and mortality risk according to delays in medical care. In total, 286 020 patients were included (mean age: 42.8, s.d.: 16.8 years; 50.4% were women). Mean time from symptom onset to medical care was 4.04 (s.d.: 3.6) days and increased with older age categories (P < 0.0001). Mortality risk increased by 6.4% for each day of delay in medical care from symptom onset. The risk of presenting with the symptoms of severity was greater with increasing age categories. In conclusion, COVID-19 patients with increasing ages tend to seek medical care later, with higher rates of symptoms of severity at initial presentation in both ambulatory units and hospitals.


Subject(s)
Aging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
9.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(9): 1277-1280, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478148

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The estimated infection rate after permanent endocardial lead implantation is between 1% and 2%. Pacemaker lead endocarditis is treated with total removal of the infected device and proper antibiotics. In this case report, we present a patient with delayed diagnosis and treatment due to the COVID-19 outbreak. CASE REPORT: An 88-year-old, pacemaker dependent woman with diagnosed pacemaker pocket infection was admitted to the University Cardiovascular institute. The patient had a prolonged follow-up time due to the COVID-19 outbreak. She missed her routine checkup and came to her local hospital when the generator had already protruded completely, to the point where she held it in her own hand. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed possible vegetations on the lead. Transesophageal echocardiography was not performed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. On the day after the admission the patient underwent transvenous removal of the pacemaker lead using a 9 French gauge rotational extraction sheathe (Cook Medical). The extracted lead was covered in a thin layer of vegetations. Further follow-ups showed good recovery with no complications. CONCLUSIONS: A case showing delayed treatment of pacemaker pocket infection, due to delayed follow-up time during the COVID-19 pandemic. This patient underwent successful transvenous removal of the infected pacemaker lead, along with adequate antibiotic therapy, which has proven to be the most effective method of treating cardiac device-related endocarditis.


Subject(s)
Device Removal , Pacemaker, Artificial/adverse effects , Prosthesis-Related Infections/diagnosis , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Prosthesis-Related Infections/therapy , Time-to-Treatment
10.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0257978, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477529

ABSTRACT

Understanding and monitoring the epidemiological time delay dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 infection provides insights that are key to discerning changes in the phenotype of the virus, the demographics impacted, the efficacy of treatment, and the ability of the health service to manage large volumes of patients. This paper analyses how the pandemic has evolved in the United Kingdom through the temporal changes to the epidemiological time delay distributions for clinical outcomes. Using the most complete clinical data presently available, we have analysed, through a doubly interval censored Bayesian modelling approach, the time from infection to a clinical outcome. Across the pandemic, for the periods that were defined as epidemiologically distinct, the modelled mean ranges from 8.0 to 9.7 days for infection to hospitalisation, 10.3 to 15.0 days for hospitalisation to death, and 17.4 to 24.7 days for infection to death. The time delay from infection to hospitalisation has increased since the first wave of the pandemic. A marked decrease was observed in the time from hospitalisation to death and infection to death at times of high incidence when hospitals and ICUs were under the most pressure. There is a clear relationship between age groups that is indicative of the youngest and oldest demographics having the shortest time delay distributions before a clinical outcome. A statistically significant difference was found between genders for the time delay from infection to hospitalisation, which was not found for hospitalisation to death. The results by age group indicate that younger demographics that require clinical intervention for SARS-CoV-2 infection are more likely to require earlier hospitalisation that leads to a shorter time to death, which is suggestive of the largely more vulnerable nature of these individuals that succumb to infection. The distinction found between genders for exposure to hospitalisation is revealing of gender healthcare seeking behaviours.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Adult , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , United Kingdom
11.
Crit Care Med ; 49(11): 1974-1982, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475880
12.
Cancer Discov ; 11(10): 2430-2435, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472319

ABSTRACT

We had previously reported short-term efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of the BNT162b2 vaccine among cancer patients with solid tumors. We aimed to evaluate these outcomes at six months postvaccination. The study cohort comprised patients who were on treatment during vaccination and throughout six months postvaccination. Serologic tests were performed after second vaccination and six months afterward. An age-matched cohort of health care workers served as controls. Documentation of COVID-19 infection, blood tests, and imaging studies during the study period was reviewed. Participants included 154 patients and 135 controls. Six months postvaccination, 122 (79%) patients were seropositive compared with 114 (84%) controls (P = 0.32). Serology titer dramatically decreased in a similar manner in both cohorts. No COVID-19 cases were documented in controls, and one case occurred in patient cohort. All previously reported adverse effects resolved. Taken together, the pattern of immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of BNT162b2 in patients with cancer with solid tumors at six months postvaccination resembles that of the general population. SIGNIFICANCE: Evidence regarding efficacy and safety of COVID-19 vaccines in patients with cancer indicate a favorable short-term profile. Immunomodulation due to anticancer treatments may affect immunity and immunogenicity of patients with cancer to the BNT162b2 vaccine over time. Our study sheds light on these long-term outcomes and portrays a trend that resembles the general population.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 2355.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Neoplasms , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neutropenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Time-to-Treatment , Vaccination
13.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1094, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To ensure safe delivery of oncologic care during the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has been rapidly adopted. However, little data exist on the impact of telemedicine on quality and accessibility of oncologic care. This study assessed whether conducting an office visit for thoracic oncology patients via telemedicine affected time to treatment initiation and accessibility. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with thoracic malignancies seen by a multidisciplinary team during the first surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia (March 1 to June 30, 2020). Patients with an index visit for a new phase of care, defined as a new diagnosis, local recurrence, or newly discovered metastatic disease, were included. RESULTS: 240 distinct patients with thoracic malignancies were seen: 132 patients (55.0%) were seen initially in-person vs 108 (45.0%) via telemedicine. The majority of visits were for a diagnosis of a new thoracic cancer (87.5%). Among newly diagnosed patients referred to the thoracic oncology team, the median time from referral to initial visit was significantly shorter amongst the patients seen via telemedicine vs. in-person (median 5.0 vs. 6.5 days, p < 0.001). Patients received surgery (32.5%), radiation (24.2%), or systemic therapy (30.4%). Time from initial visit to treatment initiation by modality did not differ by telemedicine vs in-person: surgery (22 vs 16 days, p = 0.47), radiation (27.5 vs 27.5 days, p = 0.86, systemic therapy (15 vs 13 days, p = 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid adoption of telemedicine allowed timely delivery of oncologic care during the initial surge of the COVID19 pandemic by a thoracic oncology multi-disciplinary clinic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Patient Care Team , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Time Factors
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(40): e27410, 2021 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462560

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The results of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleic acid as one of the criteria has been widely applied to assess whether the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients could discharge, however, the risk factors that affect the duration of the SARS-CoV-2 clearance remained to be an enigma. Our research was to identify risk factors correlated with prolonged duration of the SARS-CoV-2 clearance in moderate COVID-19 patients.We retrospectively analyzed 279 consecutive ordinary COVID-19 patients in 3 hospitals in Hubei province including Huangshi Hospital of Infectious Disease, Wuhan Thunder God Mountain Hospital, and Tongji Hospital. Eight clinical characters were contained as risk factors. We used a logistic regression model and nomogram to assess the possibility that the SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid may turn negative in 14 days.Time from symptoms onset to diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.56-6.46; P = .001), time from onset use of antiviral drugs to onset of symptoms (OR = 0.41; 95% CI 0.23-0.72; P = .02), and bacterial coinfection (OR = 0.07; 95% CI 0.01-0.86; P = .038) were independent risks factors for the duration of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid clearance. The regression model showed good accuracy and sensitivity (area under the curve  = 0.96). Nomogram was also provided to predict the negative conversion rate of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acids within 14 days.Time from symptoms onset to diagnosi, time from onset use of antiviral drugs to onset of symptoms, and bacterial coinfection were independent risk factors for the time of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid turning negative in ordinary COVID-19 patients. However, the age, gender, underlying disease, fungal coinfection, and duration use of antiviral drugs were irrelevant factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Nucleic Acids/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , China , Coinfection , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Time-to-Treatment , Young Adult
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(39): e27327, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447670

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there are concerns about medical delay, including confirmatory tests after screening for various cancers. We evaluated the lead time to a confirmatory test after an abnormal screening Papanicolaou (Pap) test in women before the COVID-19 period and during the COVID-19 period.The medical records of 1144 women who underwent colposcopy at a single institution located in Seoul after abnormal Pap results from January 2019 to December 2020 were reviewed. The lead time to colposcopy from the Pap test between 2019 and 2020 was compared; the adverse factors for a long lead time to colposcopy were also evaluated.Age, residence, institution, and the Pap results did not differ between women who underwent colposcopy in 2019 (n = 621) and 2020 (n = 523). The time to colposcopy from the Pap test was also not different. A higher number of women were diagnosed with high-grade dysplasia in 2020 and underwent excision procedures; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Instead, patients' residence, institution of the Pap test, and results of the Pap test were associated with a long lead time to colposcopy of >6 weeks.The lead time to colposcopy from the abnormal Pap test was not delayed in the COVID-19 era compared to before. However, regional factors could affect a long lead time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Papanicolaou Test/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Residence Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment
18.
Orthopedics ; 44(5): 293-298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444385

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) rapidly changed the landscape of health care, particularly in the New York City area. The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to both the novel coronavirus and the effects of a fracture. The goal of this study was to compare trends and outcomes of hip fracture patients during the pandemic. This was a retrospective chart review of hip fracture patients from a suburban academic hospital on Long Island, New York, who presented from March 1 to May 30, 2020. Patient COVID-19 status, demographics, and hospital outcome measures were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using heteroscedastic t tests for quantitative variables and chi-square tests for qualitative variables. There were 82 patients in the 2020 cohort and 111 in the 2019 control group, representing a 29.9% decrease in cases. The 2020 cohort presented to the hospital an average of 2.77 days after injury compared with 1.15 days for the 2019 control group (P=.0976). Patients in the 2020 cohort were more likely to be discharged home than to rehabilitation (P<.0001) and tended to be discharged with oral anticoagulation (P=.0809). There was no increase in 1-, 3-, or 6-month complications or mortality. During the pandemic, fewer patients were admitted with hip fractures, and the time from injury to presentation doubled. Patients were significantly less likely to be discharged to rehabilitation and more were discharged with oral anticoagulants. Overall, there was no increase in complications, and these data indicate that the authors were successfully able to provide high-quality care to hip fracture patients during the pandemic. [Orthopedics. 2021;44(5):293-298.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/surgery , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Discharge , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
19.
Med Oncol ; 38(11): 137, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439757

ABSTRACT

The covid-19 pandemic has impacted the management of non-covid-19 illnesses. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) requires long-duration multidisciplinary treatment. Teleconsultation and shared care are suggested solutions to mitigate the consequences of the pandemic. However, these may be challenging to implement among patients who come from the lower economic strata. We report the disastrous impact of the pandemic on the care of EOC by comparing patients who were treated during the pandemic with those treated in the previous year. We collected the following data from newly diagnosed patients with EOC: time from diagnosis to treatment, time for completion of planned chemotherapy, and proportion of patients completing various components of therapy (surgery and chemotherapy). Patients treated between January 2019 and September 2019 (Group 1: Pre-covid) were compared with those treated between January 2020 and December 2020 (Group 2: During covid pandemic). A total of 82 patients were registered [Group 1: 43(51%) Group 2: 39(49)]. The median time from diagnosis to start of treatment was longer in group 2 when compared to group 1 [31(23-58) days versus 17(11-30) days (p = 0.03)]. The proportion of patients who had surgery in group 2 was lower in comparison to group 1 [33(77%) versus 21(54%) (p = 0.02)]. Proportion of patients who underwent neoadjuvant (NACT) and surgery were fewer in group 2 in comparison to group 1 [9(33%) versus 18(64%) p = 0.002]. Among patients planned for adjuvant chemotherapy, the median time from diagnosis to treatment was longer in group 2 [28(17-45) days, group 1 versus 49(26-78) days, group 2 (p = 0.04)]. The treatment of patients with EOC was adversely impacted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There was a compromise in the proportion of patients completing planned therapy. Even among those who completed the treatment, there were considerable delays when compared with the pre-covid period. The impact of these compromises on the outcomes will be known with longer follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/therapy , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Ovarian Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care/methods , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/trends , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnosis , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Care/trends , Retrospective Studies , Time-to-Treatment/trends
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