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1.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0261428, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613352

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Delay between symptom onset and access to care is essential to prevent clinical worsening for different infectious diseases. For COVID-19, this delay might be associated with the clinical prognosis, but also with the different characteristics of patients. The objective was to describe characteristics and symptoms of community-acquired (CA) COVID-19 patients at hospital admission according to the delay between symptom onset and hospital admission, and to identify determinants associated with delay of admission. METHODS: The present work was based on prospective NOSO-COR cohort data, and restricted to patients with laboratory confirmed CA SARS-CoV-2 infection admitted to Lyon hospitals between February 8 and June 30, 2020. Long delay of hospital admission was defined as ≥6 days between symptom onset and hospital admission. Determinants of the delay between symptom onset and hospital admission were identified by univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Data from 827 patients were analysed. Patients with a long delay between symptom onset and hospital admission were younger (p<0.01), had higher body mass index (p<0.01), and were more frequently admitted to intensive care unit (p<0.01). Their plasma levels of C-reactive protein were also significantly higher (p<0.01). The crude in-hospital fatality rate was lower in this group (13.3% versus 27.6%), p<0.01. Multiple analysis with correction for multiple testing showed that age ≥75 years was associated with a short delay between symptom onset and hospital admission (≤5 days) (aOR: 0.47 95% CI (0.34-0.66)) and CRP>100 mg/L at admission was associated with a long delay (aOR: 1.84 95% CI (1.32-2.55)). DISCUSSION: Delay between symptom onset and hospital admission is a major issue regarding prognosis of COVID-19 but can be related to multiple factors such as individual characteristics, organization of care and severe pathogenic processes. Age seems to play a key role in the delay of access to care and the disease prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Hospitalization/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
Med Oncol ; 38(11): 137, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439757

ABSTRACT

The covid-19 pandemic has impacted the management of non-covid-19 illnesses. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) requires long-duration multidisciplinary treatment. Teleconsultation and shared care are suggested solutions to mitigate the consequences of the pandemic. However, these may be challenging to implement among patients who come from the lower economic strata. We report the disastrous impact of the pandemic on the care of EOC by comparing patients who were treated during the pandemic with those treated in the previous year. We collected the following data from newly diagnosed patients with EOC: time from diagnosis to treatment, time for completion of planned chemotherapy, and proportion of patients completing various components of therapy (surgery and chemotherapy). Patients treated between January 2019 and September 2019 (Group 1: Pre-covid) were compared with those treated between January 2020 and December 2020 (Group 2: During covid pandemic). A total of 82 patients were registered [Group 1: 43(51%) Group 2: 39(49)]. The median time from diagnosis to start of treatment was longer in group 2 when compared to group 1 [31(23-58) days versus 17(11-30) days (p = 0.03)]. The proportion of patients who had surgery in group 2 was lower in comparison to group 1 [33(77%) versus 21(54%) (p = 0.02)]. Proportion of patients who underwent neoadjuvant (NACT) and surgery were fewer in group 2 in comparison to group 1 [9(33%) versus 18(64%) p = 0.002]. Among patients planned for adjuvant chemotherapy, the median time from diagnosis to treatment was longer in group 2 [28(17-45) days, group 1 versus 49(26-78) days, group 2 (p = 0.04)]. The treatment of patients with EOC was adversely impacted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There was a compromise in the proportion of patients completing planned therapy. Even among those who completed the treatment, there were considerable delays when compared with the pre-covid period. The impact of these compromises on the outcomes will be known with longer follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/therapy , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Ovarian Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care/methods , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/trends , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnosis , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Care/trends , Retrospective Studies , Time-to-Treatment/trends
4.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106028, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386120

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic greatly influenced the overall quality of healthcare. The purpose of this study was to compare the time variables for acute stroke treatment and evaluate differences in the pre-hospital and in-hospital care before and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, as well as between the first and second waves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Observational and retrospective study from an Italian hospital, including patients who underwent thrombectomy between January 1st 2019 and December 31st 2020. RESULTS: Out of a total of 594 patients, 301 were treated in 2019 and 293 in 2020. The majority observed in 2019 came from spoke centers (67,1%), while in 2020 more than half (52%, p < 0.01) were evaluated at the hospital's emergency room directly (ER-NCGH). When compared to 2019, time metrics were globally increased in 2020, particularly in the ER-NCGH groups during the period of the first wave (N = 24 and N = 56, respectively): "Onset-to-door":50,5 vs 88,5, p < 0,01; "Arrival in Neuroradiology - groin":13 vs 25, p < 0,01; "Door-to-groin":118 vs 143,5, p = 0,02; "Onset-to-groin":180 vs 244,5, p < 0,01; "Groin-to-recanalization": 41 vs 49,5, p = 0,03. When comparing ER-NCGH groups between the first (N = 56) and second (N = 49) waves, there was an overall improvement in times, namely in the "Door-to-CT" (47,5 vs 37, p < 0,01), "Arrival in Neuroradiology - groin" (25 vs 20, p = 0,03) and "Onset-to-groin" (244,5 vs 227,5, p = 0,02). CONCLUSIONS: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, treatment for stroke patients was delayed, particularly during the first wave. Reallocation of resources and the shutting down of spoke centers may have played a determinant role.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/trends , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Emergency Medical Services/trends , Female , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Admission/trends , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
5.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 35(8): 462-470, 2021 08 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359548

ABSTRACT

Objectives: COVID-19 created unexpected delays in oncologic treatment. This study sought to assess the volume of missed cancer-related services due to the pandemic. Methods: This case-controlled trial evaluated more than 345,000 oncologic clinic, lab, and radiation appointments from January 1, 2019, through December 31, 2020, and surgery appointments from January 1, 2019, through October 31, 2020. All patients at the Seidman Cancer Center with a cancer diagnosis based on a comprehensive list of 2178 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition (ICD-9) and ICD-10 codes were included in the analysis. Subgroup analyses based on age, race, and sex were also performed. Results: Clinic, lab, and surgical visit cancellations increased by 4.20% (P <.001), 4.84% (P <.001), and 5.22% (P <.001), respectively. In the first 10 months of 2020, there were 703 (9.2%) fewer surgeries compared with the same time period in 2019. The following cancellation rates peaked in March 2020: clinic visits (26.53%), labs (43.66%), surgery (34.00%). Radiation oncology (12.53%) cancellations peaked in April 2020. Prior to the emergence of COVID-19, the group aged 0 to 39 years had the highest clinic cancellation rate (17.85%) compared with patients aged 40 to 64 years (15.95%) and 65 years and older (14.52%; P <.001). Men cancelled (15.63%) significantly more often than women (14.93%; P <.001) in 2019. This reversed during the pandemic: Women (19.56%) cancelled more frequently than men (19.20%; P <.036). Conclusions: There was a large increase in cancelled oncologic care in 2020, which has implications for delayed diagnosis and treatment. This was especially true for patients older than 65 years and for women. These delays could result in patients presenting with more advanced disease, complicating morbidities, and ultimately worse long-term outcomes.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/trends , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation/trends
6.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 35(8): 459, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359547

ABSTRACT

ONCOLOGY® co-editor-in-chief Howard S. Hochster, MD, reviews research on delays in oncology care as a results of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delayed Diagnosis/trends , Early Detection of Cancer/trends , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Humans , Medical Oncology/standards , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Risk Factors , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data
7.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106051, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: An association has been reported between delays in the onset-to-door (O2D) time for mechanical thrombectomy (MT) and outbreaks of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the association between other MT time courses or functional outcomes and COVID-19 outbreaks remains unclear. We compared the time courses of stroke pathways or functional outcomes in 2020 (the COVID-19 era) with those in 2019 (the pre-COVID-19 era) in Tokyo, Japan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective observational study used data from the Tokyo-tama-REgistry of Acute endovascular Thrombectomy (TREAT), a multicenter registry of MT for acute large vessel occlusion in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. Patients who had undergone acute MT from January 2019 to December 2020 were included. Patients were classified by the year they had undergone MT (2019 or 2020). RESULTS: In total, 477 patients were analyzed. O2D time was significantly longer in 2020 (146.0 min) than in 2019 (105.0 min; p = 0.034). No significant difference in door-to-puncture time (D2P) time or modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score 0-2 at 90 days was seen between 2019 and 2020. In the subgroup analysis, O2D time was significantly longer in the first half of 2020 compared with 2019. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the year 2020 was a independent predictor of longer O2D time, but not for mRS score 0-2 at 90 days. CONCLUSIONS: Although O2D time was significantly longer in the COVID-19 compared with the pre-COVID-19 era, D2P may not be significantly delayed and functional outcomes may not be different, despite the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Health Care Rationing/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Tokyo , Treatment Outcome
8.
Tex Heart Inst J ; 48(3)2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355273

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandmic, more patients are presenting with complications late after acute myocardial infarction. We report the case of a 71-year-old man who delayed seeking medical care for 2 weeks, despite progressive shortness of breath, cough, and tactile fever, for fear of contracting COVID-19 in the hospital. Clinical and echocardiographic evaluation revealed a ventricular septal rupture secondary to acute myocardial infarction. The patient underwent urgent cardiac catheterization, followed by successful saphenous vein grafting to the left anterior descending coronary artery and open surgical repair of the ventricular septal rupture with a bovine pericardial patch. This case highlights a potential long-lasting negative effect that the COVID-19 pandemic will have on the care-seeking behavior and health of patients with acute cardiovascular disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Catheterization/methods , Coronary Artery Bypass/methods , Fear , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Ventricular Septal Rupture , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Coronary Angiography/methods , Echocardiography/methods , Electrocardiography/methods , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/complications , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/physiopathology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Septal Rupture/diagnosis , Ventricular Septal Rupture/etiology , Ventricular Septal Rupture/physiopathology , Ventricular Septal Rupture/surgery
9.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(2): 185-199, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Posterior circulation stroke is characterized by poor prognosis because its optimal thrombolysis "time window" is always missed. After mechanical thrombectomy (MT), the recanalization rate of posterior circulation obstruction is significantly increased, but prognosis remains poor. To best manage patients, prognostic factors are needed to inform MT triaging after posterior circulation stroke. METHODS: A systematic literature search was done for the period through April 2020. Studies included those with posterior circulation stroke cases that underwent MT. The primary outcome measure in this study was the modified Rankin Scale on day 90. RESULTS: No outcome differences were found in gender, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and coronary artery disease (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.90-1.28; OR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.82-1.26; OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 0.94-1.68; and OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.58-1.22, respectively). Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and previous stroke correlated with poorer prognosis (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.48-0.77; OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.50-0.73; and OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55-0.99, respectively). However, hyperlipidemia correlated with better prognosis (OR = 1.28, 95% CI: 1.04-1.58). CONCLUSION: Our analysis indicates that hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or previous stroke correlate with poorer outcomes. Intriguingly, hyperlipidemia correlates with better prognosis. These factors may help inform triage decisions when considering MT for posterior circulation stroke patients. However, large, multicenter, randomized controlled trials are needed to validate these observations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Patient Admission/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Thrombectomy/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Recovery of Function , Referral and Consultation/trends , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/mortality , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(10): 106035, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Most data on telestroke utilization come from single academic hub-and-spoke telestroke networks. Our objective was to describe characteristics of telestroke consultations among a national sample of telestroke sites on one of the most commonly used common vendor platforms, prior to the COVID-19 public health emergency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A commercial telestroke vendor provided data on all telestroke consultations by two specialist provider groups from 2013-2019. Kendall's τ ß nonparametric test was utilized to assess time trends. Generalized linear models were used to assess the association between hospital consult utilization and alteplase use adjusting for hospital characteristics. RESULTS: Among 67,736 telestroke consultations to 132 spoke sites over the study period, most occurred in the emergency department (90%) and for stroke indications (final clinical diagnoses: TIA 13%, ischemic stroke 39%, hemorrhagic stroke 2%, stroke mimics 46%). Stroke severity was low (median NIHSS 2, IQR 0-6). Alteplase was recommended for 23% of ischemic stroke patients. From 2013 to 2019, times from ED arrival to NIHSS, CT scan, imaging review, consult, and alteplase administration all decreased (p<0.05 for all), while times from consult start to alteplase recommendation and bolus increased (p<0.01 for both). Transfer was recommended for 8% of ischemic stroke patients. Number of patients treated with alteplase per hospital increased with increasing number of consults and hospital size and was also associated with US region in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Longer duration of hospital participation in the network was associated with shorter hospital median door-to-needle time for alteplase delivery (39 min shorter per year, p=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Among spoke sites using a commercial telestroke platform over a seven-year time horizon, times to consult start and alteplase bolus decreased over time. Similar to academic networks, duration of telestroke participation in this commercial network was associated with faster alteplase delivery, suggesting practice improves performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Remote Consultation/trends , Stroke/surgery , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quality Improvement/trends , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States
11.
Open Heart ; 8(2)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341341

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has seen the introduction of important public health measures to minimise the spread of the virus. We aim to identify the impact government restrictions and hospital-based infection control procedures on ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) care during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Patients meeting ST elevation criteria and undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention from 27 March 2020, the day initial national lockdown measures were announced in Ireland, were included in the study. Patients presenting after the lockdown period, from 18 May to 31 June 2020, were also examined. Time from symptom onset to first medical contact (FMC), transfer time and time of wire cross was noted. Additionally, patient characteristics, left ventricular ejection fraction, mortality and biochemical parameters were documented. Outcomes and characteristics were compared against a control group of patients meeting ST elevation criteria during the month of January. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients presented with STEMI during the lockdown period. A significant increase in total ischaemic time (TIT) was noted versus controls (8.81 hours (±16.4) vs 2.99 hours (±1.39), p=0.03), with increases driven largely by delays in seeking FMC (7.13 hours (±16.4) vs 1.98 hours (±1.46), p=0.049). TIT remained significantly elevated during the postlockdown period (6.1 hours (±5.3), p=0.05), however, an improvement in patient delays was seen versus the control group (3.99 hours (±4.5), p=0.06). There was no difference seen in transfer times and door to wire cross time during lockdown, however, a significant increase in transfer times was seen postlockdown versus controls (1.81 hours (±1.0) vs 1.1 hours (±0.87), p=0.004). CONCLUSION: A significant increase in TIT was seen during the lockdown period driven mainly by patient factors highlighting the significance of public health messages on public perception. Additionally, a significant delay in transfer times to our centre was seen postlockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/trends , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Aged , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Infection Control/trends , Ireland , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Transfer/trends , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/mortality , Retrospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Treatment Outcome
12.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(4): 266-269, 2021 08.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325944

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on a pediatric cardiovascular surgery program and estimate the necessary time to reduce the surgery waiting list. METHODS: Retrospective, descriptive study. Surgical outcomes from the pre-COVID-19 period and COVID-19 period were compared. A mathematical model was used to estimate the time necessary to reduce the waiting list. RESULTS: Between March 23rd and August 31st, 2020, 83 patients underwent surgery, accounting for a 60 % reduction compared to the pre-COVID-19 period. Their median age was 6 months (interquartile range [IQR]: 25-75, 1.8 months to 2.9 years; p = 0.0023). The time necessary to eliminate the waiting list ranges from 10 to 19 months. CONCLUSIONS: There was a 60 % reduction in the program. The time required to clear the backlog of cases may range from, at least, 10 to 19 months.


Objetivo. Describir el impacto de la pandemia por COVID-19 en el programa de cirugía cardiovascular pediátrica y estimar el tiempo para reducir la lista de espera quirúrgica. Métodos. Estudio descriptivo y retrospectivo. Se compararon resultados quirúrgicos del período preCOVID versus el período COVID. Se utilizó un modelo matemático para estimar el tiempo para reducir la lista de espera. Resultados. Entre el 23 de marzo y el 31 de agosto de 2020 se operaron 83 pacientes, que representan una reducción del 60 %, respecto al período preCOVID. La mediana de edad fue de 6 meses (rango intercuartílico [RIC]: 25-75, 1,8 meses a 2,9 años; p = 0,0023. El tiempo para eliminar la lista de espera varía entre 10 y 19 meses. Conclusiones. El programa tuvo una reducción del 60 %. El tiempo de resolución de la lista de espera puede ser al menos 10 a 19 meses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Surgical Procedures/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Hospitals, Public/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Waiting Lists , Argentina/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
13.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(9): 105985, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294009

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 pandemic has forced important changes in health care worldwide. Stroke care networks have been affected, especially during peak periods. We assessed the impact of the pandemic and lockdowns in stroke admissions and care in Latin America. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multinational study (7 countries, 18 centers) of patients admitted during the pandemic outbreak (March-June 2020). Comparisons were made with the same period in 2019. Numbers of cases, stroke etiology and severity, acute care and hospitalization outcomes were assessed. RESULTS: Most countries reported mild decreases in stroke admissions compared to the same period of 2019 (1187 vs. 1166, p = 0.03). Among stroke subtypes, there was a reduction in ischemic strokes (IS) admissions (78.3% vs. 73.9%, p = 0.01) compared with 2019, especially in IS with NIHSS 0-5 (50.1% vs. 44.9%, p = 0.03). A substantial increase in the proportion of stroke admissions beyond 48 h from symptoms onset was observed (13.8% vs. 20.5%, p < 0.001). Nevertheless, no differences in total reperfusion treatment rates were observed, with similar door-to-needle, door-to-CT, and door-to-groin times in both periods. Other stroke outcomes, as all-type mortality during hospitalization (4.9% vs. 9.7%, p < 0.001), length of stay (IQR 1-5 days vs. 0-9 days, p < 0.001), and likelihood to be discharged home (91.6% vs. 83.0%, p < 0.001), were compromised during COVID-19 lockdown period. CONCLUSIONS: In this Latin America survey, there was a mild decrease in admissions of IS during the COVID-19 lockdown period, with a significant delay in time to consultations and worse hospitalization outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/trends , Hospitalization/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/trends , COVID-19/transmission , Cause of Death/trends , Endovascular Procedures/adverse effects , Endovascular Procedures/mortality , Female , Health Care Surveys , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Latin America , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Patient Admission/trends , Patient Discharge/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
14.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 207: 106793, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293656

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is unclear how interventions designed to restrict community and in-hospital exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus influenced stroke care for patients seeking acute treatment. Therefore, we aimed to determine how these COVID-19 interventions impacted acute stroke treatment times and to assess the risk of contracting COVID-19 due to their stay in our medical center. METHODS: Retrospective, single center, two-phase study evaluating hospital and community trends from 12/2019 - 04/2020 compared to the previous year and pre/post (n = 156/93) intervention implementation. Phase I assessed stroke treatment times, delay to hospital arrival, and witnessed stroke volume. Phase II, a post-implementation telephone survey, assessed risk of developing symptoms or testing positive for COVID-19. RESULTS: Stroke volume declined by 29% (p < .05) from April to March compared to the previous year. However, no significant delays in seeking medical care (pre Mdn=112, post Mdn=95, p = .34) was observed. Witnessed stroke volume decreased 11% (p < .001) compared to the pre-implementation group, but no significant delay in IV alteplase (pre Mdn=22 mins; post Mdn=26 mins, p = .08) nor endovascular treatment (pre Mdn=60 mins; post Mdn=80 mins, p = .45) was observed. In Phase II, 63 patients participated, two tested (3%) COVID-19 positive during admission and four (6%) within two weeks of discharge. COVID-19 contraction risk during and after hospitalization remained similar to the general population (RR=1.75, 95%CI: 0.79-3.63). Overall results indicated a marked decrease in stroke volume, no significant delays to either seek or provide acute stroke care were evident, and COVID-19 contraction risk was low. CONCLUSIONS: Seeking acute stroke medical care outweighs the risk of COVID-19 exposure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Admission/trends , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge/trends , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Stroke/therapy
15.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(7): 481-486, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288678

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The first wave of COVID-19 was accompanied by global uncertainty. Delayed presentation of patients to hospitals ensued, with surgical pathologies no exception. This study aimed to assess whether delayed presentations resulted in more complex appendicectomies during the first wave of COVID-19. METHODS: Operation notes for all presentations of appendicitis (n=216) within a single health board (three hospitals) during two three-month periods (control period (pre-COVID) vs COVID pandemic) were analysed, and the severity of appendicitis was recorded as per the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) grading system. RESULTS: Presentations of appendicitis were delayed during the COVID period with a median duration of symptoms prior to hospital attendance of two days versus one day (p=0.003) with individuals presenting with higher median white cell count than during the control period (14.9 vs 13.3, p=0.031). Use of preoperative CT scanning (OR 3.013, 95% CI 1.694-5.358, p<0.001) increased significantly. More complex appendicectomies (AAST grade >1) were performed (OR 2.102, 95% CI 1.155-3.826, p=0.015) with a greater consultant presence during operations (OR 4.740, 95% CI 2.523-8.903, p<0.001). Despite the greater AAST scores recorded during the COVID period, no increase in postoperative complications was observed (OR 1.145, 95% CI 0.404-3.244, p=0.798). CONCLUSIONS: Delayed presentations during the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with more complex cases of appendicitis. Important lessons can be learnt from the changes in practice employed as a result of this global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Appendectomy/methods , Appendicitis/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Appendectomy/adverse effects , Appendectomy/statistics & numerical data , Appendectomy/trends , Appendicitis/blood , Appendicitis/surgery , Appendix/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/trends , Young Adult
16.
J Trauma Acute Care Surg ; 91(1): 241-246, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276289

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, New York instituted a statewide stay-at-home mandate to lower viral transmission. While public health guidelines advised continued provision of timely care for patients, disruption of safety-net health care and public fear have been proposed to be related to indirect deaths because of delays in presentation. We hypothesized that admissions for emergency general surgery (EGS) diagnoses would decrease during the pandemic and that mortality for these patients would increase. METHODS: A multicenter observational study comparing EGS admissions from January to May 2020 to 2018 and 2019 across 11 NYC hospitals in the largest public health care system in the United States was performed. Emergency general surgery diagnoses were defined using International Classification Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes and grouped into seven common diagnosis categories: appendicitis, cholecystitis, small/large bowel, peptic ulcer disease, groin hernia, ventral hernia, and necrotizing soft tissue infection. Baseline demographics were compared including age, race/ethnicity, and payor status. Outcomes included coronavirus disease (COVID) status and mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,376 patients were admitted for EGS diagnoses from January to May 2020, a decrease compared with both 2018 (1,789) and 2019 (1,668) (p < 0.0001). This drop was most notable after the stay-at-home mandate (March 22, 2020; week 12). From March to May 2020, 3.3%, 19.2%, and 6.0% of EGS admissions were incidentally COVID positive, respectively. Mortality increased in March to May 2020 compared with 2019 (2.2% vs. 0.7%); this difference was statistically significant between April 2020 and April 2019 (4.1% vs. 0.9%, p = 0.045). CONCLUSION: Supporting our hypothesis, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and subsequent stay-at-home mandate resulted in decreased EGS admissions between March and May 2020 compared with prior years. During this time, there was also a statistically significant increase in mortality, which peaked at the height of COVID infection rates in our population. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Epidemiological, level IV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergencies/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality/trends , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease/mortality , Acute Disease/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Appendicitis/diagnosis , Appendicitis/mortality , Appendicitis/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cholecystitis/diagnosis , Cholecystitis/mortality , Cholecystitis/surgery , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hernia, Inguinal/diagnosis , Hernia, Inguinal/mortality , Hernia, Inguinal/surgery , Hernia, Ventral/diagnosis , Hernia, Ventral/mortality , Hernia, Ventral/surgery , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Necrosis/diagnosis , Necrosis/mortality , Necrosis/surgery , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/trends , Peptic Ulcer/diagnosis , Peptic Ulcer/mortality , Peptic Ulcer/surgery , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Soft Tissue Infections/diagnosis , Soft Tissue Infections/mortality , Soft Tissue Infections/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Young Adult
17.
Dermatol Clin ; 39(4): 627-637, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252656

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a unique set of challenges to cancer care centers around the world. Diagnostic and treatment delays associated with lockdown periods may be expected to increase the total number of avoidable skin cancer deaths. During this unprecedented time, dermatologists have been pressed to balance early surgical interventions for skin cancer with the risk of viral transmission. This article summarizes evidenced-based recommendations for the surgical management of cutaneous melanoma, keratinocyte cancer, and Merkel cell carcinoma during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional long-term studies are required to determine the effect of COVID-19 on skin cancer outcomes.


Subject(s)
Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Delayed Diagnosis/trends , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Skin Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors
19.
World Neurosurg ; 151: e68-e77, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164602

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical subspecialties including neurosurgery have seen a dramatic shift in operative volume in the wake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The goal of this study was to quantify the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on operative volume at 2 academic neurosurgery centers in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA from equivalent periods before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted analyzing neurosurgical case records for 2 tertiary academic centers from March to June 2020 and March to June 2019. The records were reviewed for variables including institution and physician coverage, operative volume by month and year, cases per subspecialty, patient demographics, mortality, and morbidity. RESULTS: Comparison of groups showed a 34% reduction in monthly neurosurgical volume per institution during the pandemic compared with earlier time points, including a 77% decrease during April 2020. There was no change in mortality and morbidity across institutions during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on neurosurgical practice and will likely continue to have long-term effects on patients at a time when global gross domestic products decrease and relative health expenditures increase. Clinicians must anticipate and actively prepare for these impacts in the future.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Academic Medical Centers/methods , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgery/methods , Neurosurgery/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , New Orleans/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies
20.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(6): 105746, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155562

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has impacted acute stroke care with several reports showing worldwide drops in stroke caseload during the pandemic. We studied the impact of COVID-19 on acute stroke care in our health system serving Southeast Michigan as we rolled out a policy to limit admissions and transfers. METHODS: in this retrospective study conducted at two stroke centers, we included consecutive patients presenting to the ED for whom a stroke alert was activated during the period extending from 3/20/20 to 5/20/20 and a similar period in 2019. We compared demographics, time metrics, and discharge outcomes between the two groups. RESULTS: of 385 patients presented to the ED during the two time periods, 58% were African American. There was a significant decrease in the number of stroke patients presenting to the ED and admitted to the hospital between the two periods (p <0.001). In 2020, patients had higher presenting NIHSS (median: 2 vs 5, p = 0.012), discharge NIHSS (median: 2 vs 3, p = 0.004), and longer times from LKW to ED arrival (4.8 vs 9.4 h, p = 0.031) and stroke team activation (median: 10 vs 15 min, p = 0.006). In 2020, stroke mimics rates were lower among African Americans. There were fewer hospitalizations (p <0.001), and transfers from outside facilities (p = 0.015). CONCLUSION: a trend toward faster stroke care in the ED was observed during the pandemic along with dramatically reduced numbers of ED visits, hospitalizations and stroke mimics. Delayed ED presentations and higher stroke severity characterized the African American population, highlighting deepening of racial disparities during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthcare Disparities/trends , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/trends , Quality Indicators, Health Care/trends , Stroke/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Female , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Male , Michigan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Race Factors , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/ethnology , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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