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1.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 283: 114540, 2022 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401608

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers (Menispermaceae) is a Mediterranean herb, used in Ayurvedic, Siddha, Unani, and folk medicines. The herb is also used in conventional medicine to treat oxidative stress-related diseases and conditions, including inflammation, pain, diarrhea, asthma, respiratory infections, cancer, diabetes, and gastrointestinal disorders. AIM OF THE REVIEW: The taxonomy, botanical classification, geographical distribution, and ethnobotanical uses of T. cordifolia, as well as the phytochemical compounds found in the herb, the toxicology of and pharmacological and clinical studies on the effects of T. cordifolia are all covered in this study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To gather information on T. cordifolia, we used a variety of scientific databases, including Scopus, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Science Direct. The information discussed focuses on biologically active compounds found in T. cordifolia, and common applications and pharmacological activity of the herb, as well as toxicological and clinical studies on its properties. RESULTS: The findings of this study reveal a connection between the use of T. cordifolia in conventional medicine and its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, anticancer, immunomodulatory, and other biological effects. The entire plant, stem, leaves, root, and extracts of T. cordifolia have been shown to have a variety of biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiviral, antiparasitic, antidiabetic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic, hepatoprotective, and cardioprotective impact. Toxicological testing demonstrated that this plant may have medicinal applications. T. cordifolia contains a variety of biologically active compounds from various chemical classes, including alkaloids, terpenoids, sitosterols, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Based on the reports researched for this review, we believe that chemicals in T. cordifolia may activate Nrf2, which leads to the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes such as CAT, GPx, GST, and GR, and thereby induces the adaptive response to oxidative stress. T. cordifolia is also able to reduce NF-κB signalling by inhibiting PI3K/Akt, activating AMPK and sirtuins, and downregulating PI3K/Akt. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that the pharmacological properties displayed by T. cordifolia back up its conventional uses. Antimicrobial, antiviral, antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, antidiabetic, nephroprotective, gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, and cardioprotective activities were all demonstrated in T. cordifolia stem extracts. To validate pharmacodynamic targets, further research is needed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms of the known compounds against gastrointestinal diseases, inflammatory processes, and microbial infections, as immunostimulants, and in chemotherapy. The T. cordifolia safety profile was confirmed in a toxicological analysis, which prompted pharmacokinetic assessment testing to confirm its bioavailability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Medicine, Traditional , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Plants, Medicinal , SARS-CoV-2 , Tinospora/chemistry , Humans , Phytotherapy
2.
Comput Biol Med ; 136: 104683, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333335

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19), a viral disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) was declared a global pandemic by WHO in 2020. In this scenario, SARS-CoV-2 main protease (COVID-19 Mpro), an enzyme mainly involved in viral replication and transcription is identified as a crucial target for drug discovery. Traditionally used medicinal plants contain a large amount of bioactives and pave a new path to develop drugs and medications for COVID-19. The present study was aimed to examine the potential of Emblica officinalis (amla), Phyllanthus niruri Linn. (bhumi amla) and Tinospora cordifolia (giloy) bioactive compounds to inhibit the enzymatic activity of COVID-19 Mpro. In total, 96 bioactive compounds were selected and docked with COVID-19 Mpro and further validated by molecular dynamics study. From the docking and molecular dynamics study, it was revealed that the bioactives namely amritoside, apigenin-6-C-glucosyl7-O-glucoside, pectolinarin and astragalin showed better binding affinities with COVID-19 Mpro. Drug-likeness, ADEMT and bioactivity score prediction of best drug candidates were evaluated by DruLiTo, pkCSM and Molinspiration servers, respectively. Overall, the in silico results confirmed that the validated bioactives could be exploited as promising COVID-19 Mpro inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Phyllanthus emblica , Phyllanthus , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tinospora , COVID-19 , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Humans , Medicine, Ayurvedic , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Peptide Hydrolases , Phyllanthus/chemistry , Phyllanthus emblica/chemistry , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Tinospora/chemistry
3.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0248479, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266543

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2 has become a global pandemic in a very short time span. Currently, there is no specific treatment or vaccine to counter this highly contagious disease. There is an urgent need to find a specific cure for the disease and global efforts are directed at developing SARS-CoV-2 specific antivirals and immunomodulators. Ayurvedic Rasayana therapy has been traditionally used in India for its immunomodulatory and adaptogenic effects, and more recently has been included as therapeutic adjuvant for several maladies. Amongst several others, Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Tinospora cordifolia (Guduchi) and Asparagus racemosus (Shatavari) play an important role in Rasayana therapy. The objective of this study was to explore the immunomodulatory and anti SARS-CoV2 potential of phytoconstituents from Ashwagandha, Guduchi and Shatavari using network pharmacology and docking. The plant extracts were prepared as per ayurvedic procedures and a total of 31 phytoconstituents were identified using UHPLC-PDA and mass spectrometry studies. To assess the immunomodulatory potential of these phytoconstituents an in-silico network pharmacology model was constructed. The model predicts that the phytoconstituents possess the potential to modulate several targets in immune pathways potentially providing a protective role. To explore if these phytoconstituents also possess antiviral activity, docking was performed with the Spike protein, Main Protease and RNA dependent RNA polymerase of the virus. Interestingly, several phytoconstituents are predicted to possess good affinity for the three targets, suggesting their application for the termination of viral life cycle. Further, predictive tools indicate that there would not be adverse herb-drug pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic interactions with concomitantly administered drug therapy. We thus make a compelling case to evaluate the potential of these Rasayana botanicals as therapeutic adjuvants in the management of COVID-19 following rigorous experimental validation.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Asparagus Plant/chemistry , COVID-19/metabolism , Immunologic Factors/metabolism , Molecular Docking Simulation/methods , Plant Extracts/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Tinospora/chemistry , Withania/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Herb-Drug Interactions , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacokinetics , India , Medicine, Ayurvedic/methods , Phytotherapy/methods , Plant Extracts/pharmacokinetics , Protein Binding , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
4.
Comb Chem High Throughput Screen ; 24(10): 1795-1802, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-918979

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 has been shown to bind the host cell ACE2 receptor through its spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD), required for its entry into the host cells. OBJECTIVE: We have screened phytocompounds from a medicinal herb, Tinospora cordifolia for their capacities to interrupt the viral RBD and host ACE2 interactions. METHODS: We employed molecular docking to screen phytocompounds in T. cordifolia against the ACE2-RBD complex, performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, and estimated the electrostatic component of binding free energy. RESULTS: 'Tinocordiside' docked very well at the center of the interface of ACE2-RBD complex, and was found to be well stabilized during MD simulation. Tinocordiside incorporation significantly decreased the electrostatic component of binding free energies of the ACE2-RBD complex (23.5 and 17.10 kcal/mol in the trajectories without or with the ligand, respectively). As the basal rate constant of protein association is in the order of 5 (105 to 106 M-1S-1), there might be no big conformational change or loop reorganization, but involves only local conformational change typically observed in the diffusion-controlled association. Taken together, the increase in global flexibility of the complex clearly indicates the start of unbinding process of the complex. CONCLUSION: It indicates that such an interruption of electrostatic interactions between the RBD and ACE2, and the increase in global flexibility of the complex would weaken or block SARSCoV- 2 entry and its subsequent infectivity. We postulate that natural phytochemicals like Tinocordiside could be viable options for controlling SARS-CoV-2 contagion and its entry into host cells.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Glycosides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Tinospora/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Binding Sites , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression , Glycosides/chemistry , Glycosides/isolation & purification , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Kinetics , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Static Electricity , Thermodynamics , Virus Internalization/drug effects
5.
Molecules ; 25(17)2020 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740497

ABSTRACT

A pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19) began in December 2019 in Wuhan, China, and the number of newly reported cases continues to increase. More than 19.7 million cases have been reported globally and about 728,000 have died as of this writing (10 August 2020). Recently, it has been confirmed that the SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) enzyme is responsible not only for viral reproduction but also impedes host immune responses. The Mpro provides a highly favorable pharmacological target for the discovery and design of inhibitors. Currently, no specific therapies are available, and investigations into the treatment of COVID-19 are lacking. Therefore, herein, we analyzed the bioactive phytocompounds isolated by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) from Tinospora crispa as potential COVID-19 Mpro inhibitors, using molecular docking study. Our analyses unveiled that the top nine hits might serve as potential anti-SARS-CoV-2 lead molecules, with three of them exerting biological activity and warranting further optimization and drug development to combat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Tinospora/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/classification , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , COVID-19 , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Cysteine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Cysteine Endopeptidases/genetics , Cysteine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Drug Discovery , Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry , Gene Expression , Humans , Kinetics , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Phytochemicals/classification , Phytochemicals/isolation & purification , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Protease Inhibitors/classification , Protease Inhibitors/isolation & purification , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Protein Structure, Secondary , SARS-CoV-2 , Substrate Specificity , Thermodynamics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
6.
J Biomol Struct Dyn ; 40(1): 190-203, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733451

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 (Coronavirus disease 2019) is a transmissible disease initiated and propagated through a new virus strain SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2) since 31st December 2019 in Wuhan city of China and the infection has outspread globally influencing millions of people. Here, an attempt was made to recognize natural phytochemicals from medicinal plants, in order to reutilize them against COVID-19 by the virtue of molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study. Molecular docking study showed six probable inhibitors against SARS-CoV-2 Mpro (Main protease), two from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) (Withanoside V [10.32 kcal/mol] and Somniferine [9.62 kcal/mol]), one from Tinospora cordifolia (Giloy) (Tinocordiside [8.10 kcal/mol]) and three from Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) (Vicenin [8.97 kcal/mol], Isorientin 4'-O-glucoside 2″-O-p-hydroxybenzoagte [8.55 kcal/mol] and Ursolic acid [8.52 kcal/mol]). ADMET profile prediction showed that the best docked phytochemicals from present work were safe and possesses drug-like properties. Further MD simulation study was performed to assess the constancy of docked complexes and found stable. Hence from present study it could be suggested that active phytochemicals from medicinal plants could potentially inhibit Mpro of SARS-CoV-2 and further equip the management strategy against COVID-19-a global contagion. HighlightsHolistic approach of Ayurvedic medicinal plants to avenge against COVID-19 pandemic.Active phytoconstituents of Ayurvedic medicinal plants Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Tinospora cordifolia (Giloy) and Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) predicted to significantly hinder main protease (Mpro or 3Clpro) of SARS-CoV-2.Through molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation study, Withanoside V, Somniferine, Tinocordiside, Vicenin, Ursolic acid and Isorientin 4'-O-glucoside 2″-O-p-hydroxybenzoagte were anticipated to impede the activity of SARS-CoV-2 Mpro.Drug-likeness and ADMET profile prediction of best docked compounds from present study were predicted to be safe, drug-like compounds with no toxicity.Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Ocimum sanctum , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tinospora , Withania , COVID-19 , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Ocimum sanctum/chemistry , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Tinospora/chemistry , Withania/chemistry
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