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1.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(10): e39218, 2022 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054793

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is recommended that caregivers receive oral health education and in-person training to improve toothbrushing for young children. To strengthen oral health education before COVID-19, the 21-Day FunDee chatbot with in-person toothbrushing training for caregivers was used. During the pandemic, practical experience was difficult to implement. Therefore, the 30-Day FunDee chatbot was created to extend the coverage of chatbots from 21 days to 30 days by incorporating more videos on toothbrushing demonstrations and dialogue. This was a secondary data comparison of 2 chatbots in similar rural areas of Pattani province: Maikan district (Study I) and Maelan district (Study II). OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and usability of 2 chatbots, 21-Day FunDee (Study I) and 30-Day FunDee (Study II), based on the protection motivation theory (PMT). This study explored the feasibility of using the 30-Day FunDee chatbot to increase toothbrushing behaviors for caregivers in oral hygiene care for children aged 6 months to 36 months without in-person training during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A pre-post design was used in both studies. The effectiveness was evaluated among caregivers in terms of oral hygiene practices, knowledge, and oral health care perceptions based on PMT. In Study I, participants received in-person training and a 21-day chatbot course during October 2018 to February 2019. In Study II, participants received only daily chatbot programming for 30 days during December 2021 to February 2022. Data were gathered at baseline of each study and at 30 days and 60 days after the start of Study I and Study II, respectively. After completing their interventions, the chatbot's usability was assessed using open-ended questions. Study I evaluated the plaque score, whereas Study II included an in-depth interview. The 2 studies were compared to determine the feasibility of using the 30-Day FunDee chatbot as an alternative to in-person training. RESULTS: There were 71 pairs of participants: 37 in Study I and 34 in Study II. Both chatbots significantly improved overall knowledge (Study I: P<.001; Study II: P=.001), overall oral health care perceptions based on PMT (Study I: P<.001; Study II: P<.001), and toothbrushing for children by caregivers (Study I: P=.02; Study II: P=.04). Only Study I had statistically significant differences in toothbrushing at least twice a day (P=.002) and perceived vulnerability (P=.003). The highest overall chatbot satisfaction was 9.2 (SD 0.9) in Study I and 8.6 (SD 1.2) in Study II. In Study I, plaque levels differed significantly (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: This was the first study using a chatbot in oral health education. We established the effectiveness and usability of 2 chatbot programs for promoting oral hygiene care of young children by caregivers. The 30-Day FunDee chatbot showed the possibility of improving toothbrushing skills without requiring in-person training. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Thai Clinical Trials Registry TCTR20191223005; http://www.thaiclinicaltrials.org/show/TCTR20191223005 and TCTR20210927004; https://www.thaiclinicaltrials.org/show/TCTR20210927004.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Toothbrushing , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Oral Health , Oral Hygiene , Pandemics/prevention & control
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032969

ABSTRACT

This study assessed the association between emotional distress, sleep changes, decreased frequency of tooth brushing, and self-reported oral ulcers, and the association between COVID-19 status and decreased frequency of tooth brushing. Using a cross-sectional online survey, data were collected from adults in 152 countries between July and December 2020. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the associations between dependent (decreased frequency of tooth brushing, oral ulcers, change in sleep pattern) and independent (tested positive for COVID-19, depression, anxiety, frustration/boredom, loneliness, anger, and grief/feeling of loss) variables after adjusting for confounders (age, sex, level of education, employment status). Of the 14,970 participants data analyzed, 1856 (12.4%) tested positive for COVID-19. Respondents who reported feeling depressed (AoR: 1.375), lonely (AoR: 1.185), angry (AoR: 1.299), and experienced sleep changes (AoR:1.466) had significantly higher odds of decreased tooth brushing frequency. Respondents who felt anxious (AoR: 1.255), angry (AoR: 1.510), grief/sense of loss (AoR: 1.236), and sleep changes (AoR: 1.262) had significantly higher odds of oral ulcers. Respondents who tested positive for COVID-19 had significantly higher odds of decreased tooth brushing frequency (AoR: 1.237) and oral ulcers (AoR: 2.780). These findings highlight that the relationship between emotional distress and oral health may intensify during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oral Ulcer , Psychological Distress , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Sleep , Surveys and Questionnaires , Toothbrushing
3.
Clin Oral Investig ; 26(9): 5741-5749, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826515

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate viruses' stabilities on manual toothbrushes using feline coronavirus (FeCoV) as representative of coronaviruses and an Avian influenza A virus H1N1 for influenza viruses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two viruses, FeCoV (Strain Munich; titer 107.5 TCID50/ml) and H1N1 (RE 230/90; titer 106.5 TCID50/ml), were used in this study. Manual toothbrushes were disassembled into bristles, bristle fixation, and back of the toothbrush head, contaminated with the viruses and air-dried for 24 h. In a second experiment, whole toothbrush heads were contaminated, rinsed with water (5 ml for 15 s) and then air-dried. RESULTS: For FeCoV, immediately after contamination, the following average titers were recovered: fixation: 106.41, back of head: 106.81 and bristles: 106.63 TCID50/ml. Following air-drying of 12 (fixation) and 24 h, titers of ≤ 102.5, 103.75, and 102.72 TCID50/ml were found in the respective groups, with a detection limit of 102.5 TCID50/ml. For H1N1, immediately after contamination, the following average titers could be recovered: fixation: 105.53, back of head: 105.97 and bristles: 105.75 TCID50/ml. Following air-drying of 8 (fixation) and 24 h, titers were ≤ 102.5, 103.63, and 103.53 TCID50/ml in the respective group, again with 102.5 TCID50/ml being the detection limit. In case of water rinse, no infectious virus could be recovered after 12 h. CONCLUSION: Viral load of both viruses is reduced by air-drying, especially following water rinsing. Clinical relevance The toothbrush itself plays an insignificant role in the self-transmission of coronavirus and influenza virus.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Equipment Design , Toothbrushing , Water
4.
J Oral Sci ; 64(3): 198-201, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798968

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To clarify the effect of mouth-closed tooth brushing on the suppression of droplet generation in comparison with ordinary (mouth-open) tooth brushing and to investigate the difference in plaque removal efficacy between mouth-open and mouth-closed tooth brushing. METHODS: Fourteen adults participated in the study. The labial/buccal, lingual, and occlusal surfaces of each sextant were brushed with the mouth open and closed, and a high-sensitivity camera and a high-power light source were used to measure the number of generated droplets. The plaque removal efficacy of each type of tooth brushing was evaluated according to the O'Leary Plaque Control Record. RESULTS: Significantly more droplets were generated by mouth-open brushing than by mouth-closed brushing. The number of droplets was highest when the lingual surfaces of the upper anterior sextants were brushed with the mouth open. In mouth-closed brushing, almost no droplets were observed from any region. The plaque removal rate with each type of brushing did not differ significantly among any regions except the lingual surfaces of the upper left sextant. CONCLUSION: Mouth-closed tooth brushing almost completely suppressed droplet generation and did not reduce the plaque removal efficacy. Therefore, mouth-closed tooth brushing is beneficial as an oral hygiene method during coronavirus disease 2019 outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dental Plaque , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Dental Plaque Index , Humans , Saliva , Toothbrushing/methods
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776201

ABSTRACT

Guidelines for using toothpaste during tooth-brushing in public places during the coronavirus epidemic are lacking. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of using toothpaste in terms of droplet generation during brushing, the number of droplets generated, and their scatter range are unknown; therefore, we investigated the relationships between diluted toothpaste viscosity, the number of droplets generated, and the droplets' flight distance. We developed a system to quantitate droplet generation during tooth-brushing. Brushing with water generated 5965 ± 266 droplets; 10.0× diluted toothpaste generated 538 ± 56, 4.00× diluted toothpaste generated 349 ± 15, and 2.00× diluted toothpaste generated 69 ± 27 droplets. Undiluted toothpaste generated no droplets. Droplet number tended to increase with increased toothpaste dilution ratio and decreased viscosity (r = -0.993). The maximum flight distances were 429 ± 11, 445 ± 65, 316 ± 38, and 231 ± 21 mm for water, 10.0×, 4.00×, and 2.00× diluted toothpaste, respectively. The maximum flight distance and toothpaste viscosity correlated negatively (r = -0.999). Thus, the less diluted the toothpaste, the fewer the droplets generated during brushing, and the shorter their flight distance. The use of an appropriate amount of toothpaste is recommended to prevent droplet infection during tooth-brushing.


Subject(s)
Toothbrushing , Toothpastes , Indicator Dilution Techniques , Water
7.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 153(5): 440-449, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1471857

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with several changes in maintenance of children's dental health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of these changes. METHODS: Parents were asked to respond anonymously to a questionnaire regarding alterations in their children's oral habits, such as frequency of eating and drinking, toothbrushing, signs of stress, and receiving oral health care during the lockdown period. The participants were reached either during their visit to the clinics or via the social media groups of the authors. RESULTS: There were 308 parents of children aged 1 through 18 years who responded to the questionnaires. The authors found associations between increased frequency of eating and drinking, decreased frequency of toothbrushing, and postponing oral health care. Among the children, 11% experienced more frequent oral signs of stress, such as temporomandibular disorder and aphthous stomatitis, during the lockdown. Although children from all age groups ate and drank more frequently between meals, younger children received a diagnosis of carious lesions more often during the lockdown (P = .015). CONCLUSIONS: During the lockdown, many children changed their eating, drinking, and toothbrushing habits and, thus, increased their risk of developing caries. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: During pandemic-associated re-care visits or recall visits, it is imperative to conduct a detailed interview regarding changes in oral health habits. In children at high risk, dentists recommended more diagnostic and preventive measures to prevent deterioration of their oral health. Moreover, dentists should put more emphasis on motivational interviewing to help children resume healthier routines after the lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dental Caries , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Dental Caries/epidemiology , Dental Caries/prevention & control , Humans , Oral Health , Pandemics , Parents , Surveys and Questionnaires , Toothbrushing
8.
BMC Oral Health ; 21(1): 520, 2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468056

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aims of this study were to determine the associations between psychological wellbeing, and the frequency of tooth brushing and presence of oral ulcers during the COVID-19 pandemic; and to identify the mediating roles of psychological distress (general anxiety and depression) and perceived social support in the paths of observed associations. METHODS: This cross-sectional study recruited 996 adults in Nigeria between June and August 2020. Data collected through an online survey included outcome variables (decreased frequency of tooth brushing and presence of oral ulcers), explanatory variable (psychological wellbeing), mediators (general anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms and perceived social support) and confounders (age, sex at birth, educational and employment status). Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the risk indicators for the outcome variables. A path analysis was conducted to identify the indirect effect of mediators on the association between the outcome and explanatory variables. RESULTS: Of the 966 respondents, 96 (9.9%) reported decreased tooth-brushing frequency and 129 (13.4%) had oral ulcers during the pandemic. The odds of decreased tooth-brushing during the pandemic decreased as the psychological wellbeing increased (AOR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.83-0.91; p < 0.001) and as generalized anxiety symptoms increased (AOR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.86-0.98; p = 0.009). The odds of having an oral ulcer was higher as the generalized anxiety symptoms increased (AOR: 1.15; 95% CI: 01.08-1.21; p < 0.001). Only generalized anxiety (indirect effect: 0.02; 95% CI: 0.01-0.04; P = 0.014) significantly mediated the relationship between wellbeing and tooth-brushing accounting for approximately 12% of the total effect of wellbeing on decreased toothbrushing. Generalized anxiety (indirect effect 0.05; 95% CI: - 0.07-0.03; P < 0.001) also significantly mediated the relationship between wellbeing and presence of oral ulcer accounting for 70% of the total effect of wellbeing on presence of oral ulcer. Depressive symptoms and perceived social support did not significantly mediate the associations between psychological wellbeing, decreased frequency of tooth brushing and the presence of oral ulcers. CONCLUSION: Patients who come into the dental clinic with poor oral hygiene or oral ulcers during the COVID-19 pandemic may benefit from screening for generalized anxiety and psychological wellbeing to identify those who will benefit from interventions for mental health challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oral Ulcer , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Nigeria/epidemiology , Oral Ulcer/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Toothbrushing
10.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 111, 2021 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327940

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tooth decay is one of the diseases that is closely related to people's behaviors and it can have adverse effects on their performance and their success in the future. Brushing twice a day is the simplest and most effective way to reduce tooth decay. The study aim was to determining the roles of correlational factors based on the Pender's health promotion model in brushing behavior of ninth grade students at urban public schools of Guilan province during the academic year 2019. METHODS: The present study was cross-sectional and had a descriptive-analytical type. We performed the multi-stage random sampling on 761 ninth-grade students (374 girls and 387 boys) at urban public schools of six counties (ten cities) of Guilan province in 2019. The primary tool was a questionnaire on oral health behaviors focusing on brushing behavior. In the present study, which was conducted only on brushing behavior, we revised and changed the initial questionnaire during the sessions of the research team, and then confirmed its validity and reliability. The questionnaire consisted of three parts, demographic characteristics, constructs of health promotion model, and brushing behavior. We analyzed data in SPSS 21 using regression models. RESULTS: 20.1% of students brushed their teeth at least twice a day. Optimal behavior had a statistically significant relationship with parents' education level, and gender. Based on the regression model, the health promotion model constructs described 58% of the variance of the commitment to plan of action. Perceived self-efficacy, situational influences, and perceived barriers of action had significantly stronger relationships with commitment to plan of action respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that one-unit increase in scores of commitment to plan of action and self-efficacy increased the chance of desired behavior by 12 and 14% respectively. CONCLUSION: Due to the low rate of brushing behavior in the students and the predictive power of the health promotion model in brushing behavior, we suggest planning and implementation of educational interventions for this group with an emphasis on influencing the commitment to plan of action, self-efficacy, and also the level of knowledge.


Subject(s)
Dental Caries/prevention & control , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Toothbrushing , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 76: e2659, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270465

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of 0.12% chlorhexidine alone and 0.12% chlorhexidine in combination with toothbrushing to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in mechanically ventilated patients. The Embase, Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature, PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library Online, Scopus, LIVIVO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, OpenThesis, and Open Access Thesis and Dissertations databases were used. Only randomized controlled trials without restrictions on the year or language of publication were included. Two reviewers assessed the risk of bias using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tool. A meta-analysis using a random-effects model estimated the combined relative risk (RR). The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations approach was used to assess the certainty of the evidence. Initially, 2,337 studies were identified, of which 4 were considered in the systematic review and 3 in the meta-analysis (total sample: 796 patients). The studies were published between 2009 and 2017. All eligible studies had a low risk of bias. The meta-analysis revealed that the risk of VAP was 24% lower in patients receiving chlorhexidine combined with toothbrushing than in those receiving chlorhexidine alone (RR: 0.76; 95% confidence interval: 0.55-1.06), with moderate certainty of evidence and without statistical significance. In conclusion, considering the limitations of this study, a standard protocol for the prevention of VAP is not yet recommended. More studies with larger sample sizes are needed to draw strong conclusions. However, considering that toothbrushing is a simple intervention, it should be a common practice in mechanically ventilated patients, especially among patients with coronavirus disease.


Subject(s)
Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Chlorhexidine , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/prevention & control , Respiration, Artificial , Toothbrushing
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256541

ABSTRACT

Hand hygiene is one of the most important measures available to prevent infectious diseases such as COVID-19, and it is recommended that individuals wash their hands periodically before and after meals, after using toilets, before preparing food at home, at schools, and in public places. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between oral hygiene and hand hygiene in Korean adolescents. Data from 57,303 adolescents who participated in the 2019 Korea Youth Risk Behavior web-based survey were analyzed to determine the relationship between oral hygiene and hand hygiene. A complex sample logistic regression analysis was performed to determine association between toothbrushing behavior and handwashing practices. According to the results of this study, adolescents who brushed their teeth after lunch were 1.48 times more likely to practice handwashing before lunch than were those who did not brush their teeth after lunch (p < 0.001). In addition, the odds ratios adjusted for gender, grade, school type, and residence were found to be 1.87 (p < 0.001). Moreover, these adjusted odds ratios were higher in students who received personal hygiene education (OR: 1.98, p < 0.001). Oral hygiene practices were found to be related to personal hygiene, as assessed by handwashing, in Korean adolescents. Additional studies are needed to develop ways of improving the hygiene and health of adolescents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hand Hygiene , Adolescent , Hand Disinfection , Health Behavior , Humans , Republic of Korea , Risk-Taking , SARS-CoV-2 , Toothbrushing
13.
BMC Geriatr ; 21(1): 257, 2021 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: High prevalence rates have been reported for physical inactivity, mobility limitations, and falls in older adults. Home-based exercise might be an adequate means to increase physical activity by improving health- (i.e., muscle strength) and skill-related components of physical fitness (i.e., balance), particularly in times of restricted physical activity due to pandemics. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of home-based balance exercises conducted during daily tooth brushing on measures of balance and muscle strength in healthy older adults. METHODS: Fifty-one older adults were randomly assigned to a balance exercise group (n = 27; age: 65.1 ± 1.1 years) or a passive control group (n = 24; age: 66.2 ± 3.3 years). The intervention group conducted balance exercises over a period of eight weeks twice daily for three minutes each during their daily tooth brushing routine. Pre- and post-intervention, tests were included for the assessment of static steady-state balance (i.e., Romberg test), dynamic steady-state balance (i.e., 10-m single and dual-task walk test using a cognitive and motor interference task), proactive balance (i.e., Timed-Up-and-Go Test [TUG], Functional-Reach-Test [FRT]), and muscle strength (i.e., Chair-Rise-Test [CRT]). RESULTS: Irrespective of group, the statistical analysis revealed significant main effects for time (pre vs. post) for dual-task gait speed (p < .001, 1.12 ≤ d ≤ 2.65), TUG (p < .001, d = 1.17), FRT (p = .002, d = 0.92), and CRT (p = .002, d = 0.94) but not for single-task gait speed and for the Romberg-Test. No significant group × time interactions were found for any of the investigated variables. CONCLUSIONS: The applied lifestyle balance training program conducted twice daily during tooth brushing routines appears not to be sufficient in terms of exercise dosage and difficulty level to enhance balance and muscle strength in healthy adults aged 60-72 years. Consequently, structured balance training programs using higher exercise dosages and/or more difficult balance tasks are recommended for older adults to improve balance and muscle strength.


Subject(s)
Postural Balance , Toothbrushing , Aged , Exercise , Exercise Therapy , Humans , Muscle Strength , Time and Motion Studies
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(5)2021 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154358

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has drawn attention to microbial transmission risk via aerosols in dental practice. Demonstration electric toothbrushes are used intra-orally for education. The aim of this investigation was to measure the size of droplets emitted by the brush head of two demonstration oscillating-rotating electric toothbrushes. Measurement of droplet production and size was recorded in vitro using three methods: (1) Malvern Spraytec (LASER particle size measurement device with detectable particle size of 0.1-2500 µm) and brushes mounted on a 3D-printed, two-shell form-fit fixture with a supply of tap water; (2) a DustTrak aerosol measurement device and toothpaste slurry, with brushing simulated in the oral cavity of a phantom head; (3) high-speed visualization in a simulated-use situation in the oral cavity of a phantom head, with individual evaluation of tap water, water with detergent, 70% ethanol, glycerin and toothpaste slurry. Both brushes showed the size of emitted droplets was consistently between 200 and 1200 µm, categorized as splatter (dental aerosols are <50 µm diameter). No significant incremental aerosol-sized matter was detected during toothbrush operation. The high-speed video visualization confirmed only splatter-sized droplets during operation. These findings indicate that oscillating-rotating toothbrushes do not produce aerosol-sized particles during simulated use.


Subject(s)
Aerosols/analysis , Dental Equipment , Toothbrushing/instrumentation , Equipment Design , Toothpastes
15.
Ned Tijdschr Tandheelkd ; 127(11): 639-643, 2020 Nov.
Article in Dutch | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948386

ABSTRACT

This study explores the possible effects of the current corona pandemic and the ensuing measures on parental oral care behaviour, particularly during the lockdown period. Moreover, this study examines to what extent these effects differ according to the educational level of the parents. In total, 120 parents of children aged 4-5 years completed a digital questionnaire about parental oral care behaviour. The results show that during the coronavirus lockdown, 26% of parents skipped toothbrushing more often in the morning, 44% let their child snack more often, and 22% let their child drink sweetened drinks more often. In addition, parents with a high educational level skipped tooth brushing in the morning more often than parents with a low educational level. In contrast, parents with a low educational level skipped toothbrushing more often in the evening than parents with a high educational level. The results of this small study suggest that the coronavirus lockdown affected parental oral care behaviour.


Subject(s)
Dental Caries , Oral Health , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Parents , Sugar-Sweetened Beverages , Toothbrushing
16.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 66(Suppl 2): 96-101, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-788981

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, can present respiratory complications that often lead patients to depend on mechanical ventilation (MV) for several days. It is known that Pneumonia Associated with Mechanical Ventilation (PAMV) is frequent in patients who use this equipment for a long time. As a consequence of COVID-19, its prolonged use can lead to a worse prognosis for the patients. For this reason, in addition to the insufficiency of devices for mechanical ventilation to meet the current demand, it is necessary to adopt measures aimed at preventing complications that may aggravate the patient's clinical condition and, consequently, increase the average hospital stay and the respective hospital care costs. Therefore, the objective of this study was to discuss, in a concise and practical way, and based on the available literature, the importance of adopting adequate oral hygiene protocols for patients on mechanical ventilation. Based on the data obtained, it was identified that the adoption of effective oral hygiene measures, especially under the supervision of dental professionals, can contribute to the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with MV, resulting in greater availability of mechanical ventilation equipment. Since such equipment is in great demand during the COVID-19 pandemic, the knowledge and implementation of effective oral hygiene measures will undoubtedly have an impact on improving the quality of care offered to patients, therefore benefiting all those in critical health conditions and assisted in ICUs.


RESUMO A COVID-19, causada pelo Sars-CoV-2, pode apresentar complicações respiratórias que, muitas vezes, levam o paciente a depender da ventilação mecânica por vários dias. Sabe-se que a Pneumonia Associada à Ventilação Mecânica (PAVM) é frequente nos pacientes que utilizam esse equipamento por um longo período de tempo e que sua ocorrência, consequente à COVID-19, pode cursar com um pior prognóstico para o paciente. Por esse motivo, e somado à insuficiência de aparelhos para atendimento da demanda atual, faz-se necessária a adoção de medidas que visem à prevenção de complicações que possam agravar o quadro clínico do paciente e, consequentemente, aumentar o tempo médio de internação e os respectivos custos da assistência. Sendo assim, o objetivo deste estudo foi discorrer de forma concisa e prática, com base na literatura disponível, sobre a importância da adoção de protocolos adequados de higiene oral nos pacientes em ventilação mecânica. Com base nos dados obtidos, identificou-se que a adoção de medidas efetivas de higiene oral, principalmente sob a supervisão do profissional dentista, pode contribuir para a redução da morbimortalidade associada à PAVM, resultando em maior disponibilidade de equipamentos de ventilação mecânica. Desde que tais equipamentos estão sendo muito demandados durante a pandemia da COVID-19, o conhecimento e a implantação de medidas efetivas de higiene oral, indubitavelmente, repercutirão na melhoria da qualidade da assistência oferecida aos pacientes, portanto, beneficiando todos aqueles em situação crítica de saúde e assistidos em UTIs.


Subject(s)
Humans , Oral Hygiene , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Toothbrushing/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Intensive Care Units , Mouthwashes/therapeutic use
17.
Br Dent J ; 228(7): 487, 2020 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-47989
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