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1.
JACC Cardiovasc Interv ; 15(6): 590-598, 2022 03 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747832

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of same-day discharge (SDD) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) during the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed significant stress on health care systems worldwide. SDD in highly selected TAVR patients can facilitate the provision of essential cardiovascular care while managing competing COVID-19 resource demands. METHODS: Patient selection for SDD was at the discretion of the local multidisciplinary heart team, across 7 international sites. The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, myocardial infarction, all-cause readmission, major vascular complications, and new permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation. RESULTS: From March 2020 to August 2021, 124 of 2,100 patients who underwent elective transfemoral TAVR were selected for SDD. The average age was 78.9 ± 7.8 years, the median Society of Thoracic Surgeons score was 2.4 (IQR: 1.4-4.2), and 32.3% (n = 40) had preexisting PPMs. There were no major vascular complications, strokes, or deaths during the index admission. One patient (0.8%) required PPM implantation for complete heart block and was discharged the same day. No patient required a PPM between discharge home and 30-day follow-up. The composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, myocardial infarction, all-cause readmission, major vascular complications, and new PPM at 30 days occurred in 5.7% patients (n = 6 of 106). CONCLUSIONS: SDD post-TAVR is safe and feasible in selected patients at low risk for adverse clinical events postdischarge. This strategy may have a potential role in highly selected patients even when the COVID-19 pandemic abates.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aftercare , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aortic Valve Stenosis/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Valve Stenosis/etiology , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
3.
Int J Cardiol ; 352: 190-194, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636840

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic upset healthcare systems and their logistics worldwide. We sought to assess safety and effectiveness of an optimized logistics for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) pathway developed during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis. An optimized TAVI logistics based on performing TAVI work-up and procedure during the same hospitalization was used during the COVID-19 pandemic. In-hospital and 30-day outcomes of patients treated during the pandemic were compared with an historical cohort of patients undergoing TAVI with staged work-up before the pandemic within an homogeneous timeframe. RESULTS: Of 536 patients, 227 (42.4%) underwent TAVI during the COVID-19 pandemic with a reduction of 26.5% compared to the pre-pandemic period (n = 309). The median age was 81 (77-85) years and STS score was 3.4 (2.2-5.6)%. Lower rates of in-hospital major vascular complications (2.2% vs. 8.7%; p < 0.01) and life-threatening bleeding (0.4% vs. 4.2%; p = 0.01) were reported in the COVID-19 period, whereas no difference in acute kidney injury (7.0% vs. 7.4%, p = 0.85) rate was reported between COVID-19 and pre-COVID-19 periods. No difference in 30-day rates of all-cause death (4.0 vs. 4.5, p = 0.75) and of major adverse cardiovascular events (4.0 vs. 6.1, p = 0.26) were reported between COVID-19 and pre-COVID-19 periods. CONCLUSIONS: The use of optimized single-hospitalization logistics for TAVI workup and procedure developed during the COVID-19 pandemic, showed to be as safe and effective as the two-stage TAVI pathway previously adopted, allowing the minimization of potential exposure to COVID-19 infection and shortening times to treatment for severely symptomatic patients.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aged, 80 and over , Aortic Valve/surgery , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/methods , Treatment Outcome
5.
Am Heart J ; 243: 77-86, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Regulatory agencies have endorsed more limited approaches to clinical trial site monitoring. However, the impact of different monitoring strategies on trial conduct and outcomes is unclear. METHODS: We conducted a patient-level block-randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of intensive versus limited monitoring on cardiovascular clinical trial conduct and outcomes nested within the CoreValve Continued Access and Expanded Use Studies. Intensive monitoring included complete source data verification of all critical datapoints whereas limited monitoring included automated data checks only. This study's endpoints included clinical trial outcome ascertainment as well as monitoring action items, protocol deviations, and adverse event ascertainment. RESULTS: A total of 2,708 patients underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and were randomized to either intensive monitoring (n = 1,354) or limited monitoring (n = 1,354). Monitoring action items were more common with intensive monitoring (52% vs 15%; P < .001), but there was no difference in the percentage of patients with any protocol deviation (91.6% vs 90.4%; P = .314). The reported incidence of trial outcomes between intensive and limited monitoring was similar for mortality (30 days: 4.8% vs 5.5%, P = .442; 1 year: 20.3% vs 21.3%, P = .473) and stroke (30 days: 2.8% vs 2.4%, P = .458), as well as most secondary trial outcomes with the exception of bleeding (intensive: 36.3% vs limited: 32.0% at 30 days, P = .019). There was a higher reported incidence of cardiac adverse events reported in the intensive monitoring group at 1 year (76.7% vs 72.4%; P = .019). CONCLUSIONS: Tailored limited monitoring strategies can be implemented without influencing the integrity of TAVR trial outcomes.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Stroke , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis/adverse effects , Humans , Incidence , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/prevention & control , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/methods , Treatment Outcome
6.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258963, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496521

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provokes early injury response, represented in part by dynamic changes in the inflammatory markers. The association of self-expanding valves (SEVs) and balloon-expandable valves (BEVs) with the consequent inflammatory response remains uncertain. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who underwent transfemoral TAVI: SEVs or BEVs, from January 2010 to December 2019 were enrolled. Whole white blood cells (WBC) and subpopulation dynamics as well the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were evaluated. RESULTS: Three-hundred seventy consecutive patients (mean age 81.75 ± 6.8 years, 199 women's) were enrolled. In the entire population, significant kinetic changes in the WBC response (p <0.0001) between admission and first 24 hours post procedure, with a significant increase in total WBC (7.46 ± 2.26 to 10.08 ± 3.55) and absolute neutrophil count (4.97 ± 2.06 to 8.19 ± 3.43), NL ratio (3.72 ± 2.8 to 9.76 ± 7.29), and a meaningful decrease in absolute lymphocytes count (1.67 ± 1.1 to 1.1 ± 0.76). When compared between the types of valves, SEVs were associated with a more pronounced inflammatory response than BEVs, with total WBC (10.44 ± 3.86 vs. 9.45 ± 3.19) neutrophils (8.56 ± 3.75 vs. 7.55 ± 3.06) with p 0.016 and 0.012 respectively. CONCLUSION: This is the first description of a differential inflammatory response between the two leading delivery systems. SEV appears to trigger a more robust inflammatory response as compared to BEV. Clinical studies are warranted to assess the long term effect of our findings.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Inflammation/etiology , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aortic Valve Stenosis/blood , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Lymphocytes , Male , Neutrophils , Postoperative Complications/blood , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Treatment Outcome
7.
Clin Cardiol ; 44(10): 1344-1353, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for treating aortic stenosis (AS) has increased exponentially in recent years. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of valvular heart disease, disparities in quality of care (QoC) for TAVI patients remain widespread across Europe. Tailored QoC measures will help to reduce resource utilization and improve patient outcomes without compromising patient safety. Using a clear set of QoC measures, the BENCHMARK registry aims to document the progress that can be achieved if such tailored QoC measures are implemented. METHODS: The BENCHMARK registry (BENCHMARK) is a non-interventional, multicenter registry in patients with severe symptomatic AS undergoing TAVI with a 1- and 12-months follow-up. BENCHMARK will be conducted at 30 centers across Europe and will enroll a total of 2400 consecutive TAVI patients. Patients suffering from severe symptomatic AS who undergo TAVI with a balloon-expandable transcatheter aortic valve will be included. The registry will comprise four phases: (1) a retrospective baseline evaluation phase; (2) an education phase; (3) an implementation phase; and (4) a prospective effect documentation phase (prospective phase). The registry's primary objectives are to reduce the length of hospital stay and accelerate the post-procedural patient recovery pathway, but without compromising safety. The study started in April 2021 and has an estimated completion date of May 2023. DISCUSSION: BENCHMARK will establish QoC measures to reduce resource utilization, intensive care unit bed occupancy, and overall length of hospitalization with uncompromised patient safety post-TAVI (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04579445).


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve/surgery , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Benchmarking , Europe , Humans , Prospective Studies , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
8.
Can J Cardiol ; 37(10): 1547-1554, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439940

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically altered the delivery of healthcare services, resulting in significant referral pattern changes, delayed presentations, and procedural delays. Our objective was to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on all-cause mortality in patients awaiting commonly performed cardiac procedures. METHODS: Clinical and administrative data sets were linked to identify all adults referred for: (1) percutaneous coronary intervention; (2) coronary artery bypass grafting; (3) valve surgery; and (4) transcatheter aortic valve implantation, from January 2014 to September 2020 in Ontario, Canada. Piece-wise regression models were used to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on referrals and procedural volume. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the effect of the pandemic on waitlist mortality for the 4 procedures. RESULTS: We included 584,341 patients who were first-time referrals for 1 of the 4 procedures, of whom 37,718 (6.4%) were referred during the pandemic. The pandemic period was associated with a significant decline in the number of referrals and procedures completed compared with the prepandemic period. Referral during the pandemic period was a significant predictor for increased all-cause mortality for the percutaneous coronary intervention (hazard ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-2.27) and coronary artery bypass grafting (hazard ratio, 1.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.01), but not for surgical valve or transcatheter aortic valve implantation referrals. Procedural wait times were shorter during the pandemic period compared with the prepandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant decrease in referrals and procedures completed for cardiac procedures during the pandemic period. Referral during the pandemic was associated with increased all-cause mortality while awaiting coronary revascularization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronary Artery Bypass/statistics & numerical data , Delayed Diagnosis , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data , Waiting Lists/mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/psychology , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Delayed Diagnosis/psychology , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Ontario/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment/organization & administration
9.
Eur J Prev Cardiol ; 28(1): 87-97, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387867

ABSTRACT

Along with epidemiologic transitions of the global population, the burden of aortic stenosis (AS) is rapidly increasing and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has quickly spread; indeed, it is nowadays also employed in treating patients with AS at intermediate operative risk. Nonetheless, the less invasive interventional strategy still carries relevant issues concerning post-procedural optimal antithrombotic strategy, given the current indications provided by guidelines are not completely supported by evidence-based data. Geriatric patients suffer from high bleeding and thromboembolic risks, whose balance is particularly subtle due to the presence of concomitant conditions, such as atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease, that make the post-TAVR antithrombotic management particularly insidious. This scenario is further complicated by the lack of specific evidence regarding the 'real-life' complex conditions typical of the geriatric syndromes, thus, the management of such a heterogeneous population, ranging from healthy ageing to frailty, is far from being defined. The aim of the present review is to summarize the critical points and the most updated evidence regarding the post-TAVR antithrombotic approach in the geriatric population, with a specific focus on the most frequent clinical settings.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis/drug therapy , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , COVID-19/complications , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Age Factors , Aged , Aortic Valve Stenosis/complications , Humans , Risk Factors
10.
Am Heart J ; 241: 14-25, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted routine cardiovascular care, with unclear impact on procedural deferrals and associated outcomes across diverse patient populations. METHODS: Cardiovascular procedures performed at 30 hospitals across 6 Western states in 2 large, non-profit healthcare systems (Providence St. Joseph Health and Stanford Healthcare) from December 2018-June 2020 were analyzed for changes over time. Risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality was compared across pandemic phases with multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Among 36,125 procedures (69% percutaneous coronary intervention, 13% coronary artery bypass graft surgery, 10% transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and 8% surgical aortic valve replacement), weekly volumes changed in 2 distinct phases after the initial inflection point on February 23, 2020: an initial period of significant deferral (COVID I: March 15-April 11) followed by recovery (COVID II: April 12 onwards). Compared to pre-COVID, COVID I patients were less likely to be female (P = .0003), older (P < .0001), Asian or Black (P = .02), or Medicare insured (P < .0001), and COVID I procedures were higher acuity (P < .0001), but not higher complexity. In COVID II, there was a trend toward more procedural deferral in regions with a higher COVID-19 burden (P = .05). Compared to pre-COVID, there were no differences in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality during both COVID phases. CONCLUSIONS: Significant decreases in cardiovascular procedural volumes occurred early in the COVID-19 pandemic, with disproportionate impacts by race, gender, and age. These findings should inform our approach to future healthcare disruptions.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Disease/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Bypass/statistics & numerical data , Coronary Artery Disease/surgery , Hospital Mortality , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data , African Americans , Aged , Asian Americans , Female , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Medicare , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , United States/epidemiology
13.
Cardiovasc Revasc Med ; 28S: 68-71, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176553

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a decrease in interventional treatment for structural heart disease worldwide. In this context, the management of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (AS) or bioprosthetic valve dysfunction (BVD) represents a clinical challenge, as a delay in aortic valve replacement procedures may increase short-term morbidity and mortality. We report four cases of TAVR performed in patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. All of them were discharged in good clinical conditions and no adverse events were reported at 30 days follow-up. Our experience suggests that in selected patients with mild SARS-CoV-2 infection and symptomatic native AS or BVD, TAVR has a favorable short-term outcome.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Valve/surgery , Aortic Valve Stenosis/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
14.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153699

ABSTRACT

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a proven treatment for life-threatening aortic valve disease, predominantly severe aortic stenosis. However, even among developed nations, access to TAVI is not uniform. The Valve for Life initiative was launched by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions in 2015 with the objective of improving access to transcatheter valve interventions across Europe. The UK has been identified as a country with low penetration of these procedures and has been selected as the fourth nation to be included in the initiative. Specifically, the number of TAVI procedures carried out in the UK is significantly lower than almost all other European nations. Furthermore, there is substantial geographical inequity in access to TAVI within the UK. As a consequence of this underprovision, waiting times for TAVI are long, and mortality among those waiting intervention is significant. This article reviews these issues, reports new data on access to TAVI in the UK and presents the proposals of the UK Valve for Life team to address the current problems in association with the British Cardiovascular Intervention Society.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Aortic Valve/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/methods , Aortic Valve Stenosis/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Risk Factors , United Kingdom
16.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 21(11 Suppl 1): 45S-47S, 2020 11.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088802

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to deferral of many non-urgent procedures in most healthcare systems worldwide. With this study we aimed to quantify the impact of COVID-19 on interventional treatment of structural heart disease (SHD) in Italy. METHODS: Numbers of transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR), left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO), patent foramen ovale (PFO) closures performed over a 4-week period during the national lockdown in Italian centers performing over 60 structural heart interventions (SHI)/year were compared with the same 4-week period in 2019. Incidence rate reductions (IRR) were estimated by zero-inflated negative binomial regression. RESULTS: According to our nationwide analysis, SHIs were reduced by 79% as compared to the same period in 2019 (IRR 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15-0.29). This reduction was more substantial for PFO closure (IRR 0.03, 95% CI 0.01-0.07), LAAO (IRR 0.11, 95% CI 0.05-0.25) and PMVR (IRR 0.12, 95% CI 0.04-0.36) as compared to TAVR (IRR 0.31, 95% CI 0.22-0.47). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic caused a 79% drop in SHI volumes in Italy. PFO closure, LAAO and PMVR decreased more significantly as compared to TAVR. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of this reduction on outcomes of patients with SHD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Atrial Appendage/surgery , Confidence Intervals , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Foramen Ovale, Patent/surgery , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mitral Valve/surgery , Prevalence , Time Factors , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data
17.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 98(3): E478-E482, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1074302

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the cancellation of many elective surgical procedures. This has led to reports of an increase in mortality for patients with non-Covid health conditions due to delayed definitive management. Patients with severe aortic stenosis have a high annual mortality if left untreated. These patients are at risk due to the reduced number of surgical aortic valve replacements and competition for intensive care facilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. This case series suggests that the minimally invasive transcatheter aortic valve implantation is safe to continue during the COVID-19 pandemic with adjustments to the patient pathway to minimize hospital stay and to reduce patient and staff exposure. This helps to reduce the delay of definitive treatment for patients with severe aortic stenosis.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve Stenosis/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
18.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 98(5): E733-E736, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059412

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The current report describes a single operator's experience of the first use of smartglass technology as a facilitator of virtual support during TAVR proctoring. BACKGROUND: Restricted gatherings and containment measures during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic have a major impact on daily clinical practice. Interaction between peers is crucial in science, clinical practice, and education. In addition, there is also a growing importance of proctoring in interventional cardiology for structural heart disease. Virtual support may facilitate the wide implementation of remote proctoring. METHODS: A collaboration between a smartglass provider (Rods & Cones) and self-expandable transcatheter aortic heart valve system (Medtronic) was initiated and tested extensively prior to TAVR procedures. Two cases were randomly selected for remote support. The light-weight smartglass consisted of a full HD central camera, a 720p ×5 optical zoom camera, built-in LED light, speaker and earphone jack, and an external visor to project data in a nonobstructive manner in the operators' view. RESULTS: Preprocedural detailed discussion of the cases between the proctor and the operator occurred via teleconferencing. Successful procedural virtual support was determined by the presence of a session coordinator, high quality of the central camera, high-speed and stable wireless internet connection. Limitations were the relative discomfort of the earpieces, discordance between the central and zoom camera and the absence of visual fixation during head motions. CONCLUSION: In a highly complex and demanding context such as TAVR, remote proctoring by means of virtual support is feasible and efficacious.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Valve/surgery , Aortic Valve Stenosis/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
19.
Am J Cardiol ; 145: 97-101, 2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1032332

ABSTRACT

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) outcomes during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have not been fully evaluated and some structural programs in the world have been suspended during this period. We sought to evaluate and compare clinical outcomes in patients undergoing TAVI in pandemic versus nonpandemic era. In a single center, we compared 198 TAVI patients performed during 2019 to 59 patients performed during the COVID-19 pandemic period (March 1st to June 30th, 2020). Primary outcome was procedural success according to VARC criteria and 30-day mortality rates. VARC-defined procedural success was high in both groups (93.3% vs 96.6%; p = 0.53). There were no differences in any vascular complications (26% vs 19%; p = 0.3), permanent pacemaker implantation (11.8% vs 15.3%; p = 0.63), and length of hospital stay (5.2 vs 4.2 days; p = 0.29). Thirty-day mortality was similar (3% vs 3.4%; p = 1.0). We had no documented COVID-19 disease in our patients during follow up. In conclusion, TAVI procedures can be performed effectively and safely during the COVID-9 pandemic, using a minimalist approach, early discharge, and by maintaining proper use of personal protective equipment.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Valve Diseases/surgery , Pandemics , Registries , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/methods , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Female , Heart Valve Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
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