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1.
J Nat Prod ; 85(1): 284-291, 2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596477

ABSTRACT

We have previously reported that neoechinulin B (1a), a prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid, shows antiviral activities against hepatitis C virus (HCV) via the inactivation of the liver X receptors (LXRs) and the resultant disruption of double-membrane vesicles. In this study, a two-step synthesis of the diketopiperazine scaffold of 1a was achieved by the base-induced coupling of 1,4-diacetyl-3-{[(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)oxy]methyl}piperazine-2,5-dione with aldehydes, followed by the treatment of the resultant coupling products with tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride. Compound 1a and its 16 derivatives 1b-q were prepared using this method. Furthermore, variecolorin H, a related alkaloid, was obtained by the acid treatment of 1a in MeOH. The antiviral evaluation of 1a and its derivatives revealed that 1a, 1c, 1d, 1h, 1j, 1l, and 1o exhibited both anti-HCV and anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) activities. The results of this study indicate that the exomethylene moiety on the diketopiperazine ring is important for the antiviral activities. The antiviral compounds can inhibit the production of HCV and SARS-CoV-2 by inactivating LXRs.


Subject(s)
Alkaloids/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Hepacivirus/drug effects , Piperazines/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Alkaloids/chemical synthesis , Alkaloids/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Cell Line, Tumor , Diketopiperazines/chemistry , Diketopiperazines/pharmacology , Humans , Liver X Receptors/antagonists & inhibitors , Molecular Structure , Piperazines/chemical synthesis , Piperazines/chemistry , Structure-Activity Relationship , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
2.
Antiviral Res ; 197: 105232, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588314

ABSTRACT

We report the in vitro antiviral activity of DZNep (3-Deazaneplanocin A; an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase) against SARS-CoV-2, besides demonstrating its protective efficacy against lethal infection of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV, a member of the Coronaviridae family). DZNep treatment resulted in reduced synthesis of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and proteins without affecting other steps of viral life cycle. We demonstrated that deposition of N6-methyl adenosine (m6A) in SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the infected cells recruits heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1), an RNA binding protein which serves as a m6A reader. DZNep inhibited the recruitment of hnRNPA1 at m6A-modified SARS-CoV-2 RNA which eventually suppressed the synthesis of the viral genome. In addition, m6A-marked RNA and hnRNPA1 interaction was also shown to regulate early translation to replication switch of SARS-CoV-2 genome. Furthermore, abrogation of methylation by DZNep also resulted in defective synthesis of the 5' cap of viral RNA, thereby resulting in its failure to interact with eIF4E (a cap-binding protein), eventually leading to a decreased synthesis of viral proteins. Most importantly, DZNep-resistant mutants could not be observed upon long-term sequential passage of SARS-CoV-2 in cell culture. In summary, we report the novel role of methylation in the life cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and propose that targeting the methylome using DZNep could be of significant therapeutic value against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Genome, Viral/drug effects , Methyltransferases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine/pharmacology , Animals , Chick Embryo , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing , DNA Methylation/drug effects , DNA Methylation/physiology , Drug Resistance, Viral/drug effects , Genome, Viral/genetics , Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1/metabolism , Humans , Lethal Dose 50 , Mice , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , RNA, Viral/drug effects , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Rabbits , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Vero Cells
3.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 149(3): 923-933.e6, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Treatments for coronavirus disease 2019, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), are urgently needed but remain limited. SARS-CoV-2 infects cells through interactions of its spike (S) protein with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) on host cells. Multiple cells and organs are targeted, particularly airway epithelial cells. OM-85, a standardized lysate of human airway bacteria with strong immunomodulating properties and an impeccable safety profile, is widely used to prevent recurrent respiratory infections. We found that airway OM-85 administration inhibits Ace2 and Tmprss2 transcription in the mouse lung, suggesting that OM-85 might hinder SARS-CoV-2/host cell interactions. OBJECTIVES: We sought to investigate whether and how OM-85 treatment protects nonhuman primate and human epithelial cells against SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: ACE2 and TMPRSS2 mRNA and protein expression, cell binding of SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein, cell entry of SARS-CoV-2 S protein-pseudotyped lentiviral particles, and SARS-CoV-2 cell infection were measured in kidney, lung, and intestinal epithelial cell lines, primary human bronchial epithelial cells, and ACE2-transfected HEK293T cells treated with OM-85 in vitro. RESULTS: OM-85 significantly downregulated ACE2 and TMPRSS2 transcription and surface ACE2 protein expression in epithelial cell lines and primary bronchial epithelial cells. OM-85 also strongly inhibited SARS-CoV-2 S1 protein binding to, SARS-CoV-2 S protein-pseudotyped lentivirus entry into, and SARS-CoV-2 infection of epithelial cells. These effects of OM-85 appeared to depend on SARS-CoV-2 receptor downregulation. CONCLUSIONS: OM-85 inhibits SARS-CoV-2 epithelial cell infection in vitro by downregulating SARS-CoV-2 receptor expression. Further studies are warranted to assess whether OM-85 may prevent and/or reduce the severity of coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Extracts/administration & dosage , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Extracts/immunology , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/virology , HEK293 Cells , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Serine Endopeptidases/drug effects , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/immunology , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Transcription, Genetic/immunology , Vero Cells
4.
Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol ; 23(1): 21-39, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537322

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has killed millions of people and continues to cause massive global upheaval. Coronaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses with an unusually large genome of ~30 kb. They express an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a cohort of other replication enzymes and supporting factors to transcribe and replicate their genomes. The proteins performing these essential processes are prime antiviral drug targets, but drug discovery is hindered by our incomplete understanding of coronavirus RNA synthesis and processing. In infected cells, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase must coordinate with other viral and host factors to produce both viral mRNAs and new genomes. Recent research aiming to decipher and contextualize the structures, functions and interplay of the subunits of the SARS-CoV-2 replication and transcription complex proteins has burgeoned. In this Review, we discuss recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular basis and complexity of the coronavirus RNA-synthesizing machinery. Specifically, we outline the mechanisms and regulation of RNA translation, replication and transcription. We also discuss the composition of the replication and transcription complexes and their suitability as targets for antiviral therapy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Design , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transcription, Genetic , Virus Replication/physiology , Animals , Humans , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
5.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470935

ABSTRACT

Excessive host inflammation following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with severity and mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We recently reported that the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein S1 subunit (S1) induces pro-inflammatory responses by activating toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in macrophages. A standardized extract of Asparagus officinalis stem (EAS) is a unique functional food that elicits anti-photoaging effects by suppressing pro-inflammatory signaling in hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B-exposed skin fibroblasts. To elucidate its potential in preventing excessive inflammation in COVID-19, we examined the effects of EAS on pro-inflammatory responses in S1-stimulated macrophages. Murine peritoneal exudate macrophages were co-treated with EAS and S1. Concentrations and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Expression and phosphorylation levels of signaling proteins were analyzed using western blotting and fluorescence immunomicroscopy. EAS significantly attenuated S1-induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 in a concentration-dependent manner without reducing cell viability. EAS also markedly suppressed the S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß. However, among the TLR4 signaling proteins, EAS did not affect the degradation of inhibitor κBα, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase p54 subunit after S1 exposure. In contrast, EAS significantly suppressed S1-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Attenuation of S1-induced transcription of IL-6 and IL-1ß by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126 was greater than that by the Akt inhibitor perifosine, and the effects were potentiated by simultaneous treatment with both inhibitors. These results suggest that EAS attenuates S1-induced IL-6 and IL-1ß production by suppressing p44/42 MAPK and Akt signaling in macrophages. Therefore, EAS may be beneficial in regulating excessive inflammation in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asparagus Plant/chemistry , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Macrophages/drug effects , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Asparagus Plant/metabolism , Butadienes/pharmacology , Cell Survival/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Macrophages/cytology , Macrophages/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3/metabolism , Nitriles/pharmacology , Phosphorylation/drug effects , Plant Extracts/chemistry , Plant Stems/chemistry , Plant Stems/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 648815, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325521

ABSTRACT

Multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that cigarette smoke or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease upregulates angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, the cellular receptor for the entry of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, which predisposes individuals to develop severe Coronavirus disease 2019. The reason for this observation is unknown. We recently reported that the loss of function of Miz1 in the lung epithelium in mice leads to a spontaneous COPD-like phenotype, associated with upregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. We also reported that cigarette smoke exposure downregulates Miz1 in lung epithelial cells and in mice, and Miz1 is also downregulated in the lungs of COPD patients. Here, we provide further evidence that Miz1 directly binds to and represses the promoter of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in mouse and human lung epithelial cells. Our data provide a potential molecular mechanism for the upregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 observed in smokers and COPD patients, with implication in severe Coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Transcription, Genetic , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , BTB-POZ Domain , Cell Line , Cigarette Smoking/adverse effects , Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/chemistry , Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors/genetics , Mice , Promoter Regions, Genetic , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factors/pharmacology , Virus Internalization
7.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232577

ABSTRACT

Thrombin, the ligand of the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), is a well-known stimulator of proangiogenic responses in vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which are mediated through the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, the transcriptional events underlying this thrombin-induced VEGF induction and angiogenic response are less well understood at present. As reported here, we conducted detailed promotor activation and signal transduction pathway studies in human microvascular ECs, to decipher the transcription factors and the intracellular signaling events underlying the thrombin and PAR-1-induced endothelial VEGF induction. We found that c-FOS is a key transcription factor controlling thrombin-induced EC VEGF synthesis and angiogenesis. Upon the binding and internalization of its G-protein-coupled PAR-1 receptor, thrombin triggers ERK1/2 signaling and activation of the nuclear AP-1/c-FOS transcription factor complex, which then leads to VEGF transcription, extracellular secretion, and concomitant proangiogenic responses of ECs. In conclusion, exposure of human microvascular ECs to thrombin triggers signaling through the PAR-1-ERK1/2-AP-1/c-FOS axis to control VEGF gene transcription and VEGF-induced angiogenesis. These observations offer a greater understanding of endothelial responses to thromboinflammation, which may help to interpret the results of clinical trials tackling the conditions associated with endothelial injury and thrombosis.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation , Neovascularization, Physiologic/genetics , Thrombin/pharmacology , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Microvessels/pathology , Neovascularization, Physiologic/drug effects , Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun/metabolism , Receptor, PAR-1/metabolism , Transcription Factor AP-1/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics
8.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100687, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198855

ABSTRACT

Glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatory drugs that are used to treat an extraordinary range of human disease, including COVID-19, underscoring the ongoing importance of understanding their molecular mechanisms. Early studies of GR signaling led to broad acceptance of models in which glucocorticoid receptor (GR) monomers tether repressively to inflammatory transcription factors, thus abrogating inflammatory gene expression. However, newer data challenge this core concept and present an exciting opportunity to reframe our understanding of GR signaling. Here, we present an alternate, two-part model for transcriptional repression by glucocorticoids. First, widespread GR-mediated induction of transcription results in rapid, primary repression of inflammatory gene transcription and associated enhancers through competition-based mechanisms. Second, a subset of GR-induced genes, including targets that are regulated in coordination with inflammatory transcription factors such as NF-κB, exerts secondary repressive effects on inflammatory gene expression. Within this framework, emerging data indicate that the gene set regulated through the cooperative convergence of GR and NF-κB signaling is central to the broad clinical effectiveness of glucocorticoids in terminating inflammation and promoting tissue repair.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , NF-kappa B/genetics , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Genomics/methods , Humans , Inflammation/prevention & control , Models, Genetic , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/immunology , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/agonists , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Transcription, Genetic/immunology
9.
Nature ; 593(7859): 418-423, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1137788

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is the third outbreak this century of a zoonotic disease caused by a coronavirus, following the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 20031 and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 20122. Treatment options for coronaviruses are limited. Here we show that clofazimine-an anti-leprosy drug with a favourable safety profile3-possesses inhibitory activity against several coronaviruses, and can antagonize the replication of SARS-CoV-2 and MERS-CoV in a range of in vitro systems. We found that this molecule, which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, inhibits cell fusion mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein, as well as activity of the viral helicase. Prophylactic or therapeutic administration of clofazimine in a hamster model of SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis led to reduced viral loads in the lung and viral shedding in faeces, and also alleviated the inflammation associated with viral infection. Combinations of clofazimine and remdesivir exhibited antiviral synergy in vitro and in vivo, and restricted viral shedding from the upper respiratory tract. Clofazimine, which is orally bioavailable and comparatively cheap to manufacture, is an attractive clinical candidate for the treatment of outpatients and-when combined with remdesivir-in therapy for hospitalized patients with COVID-19, particularly in contexts in which costs are an important factor or specialized medical facilities are limited. Our data provide evidence that clofazimine may have a role in the control of the current pandemic of COVID-19 and-possibly more importantly-in dealing with coronavirus diseases that may emerge in the future.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Clofazimine/pharmacology , Coronavirus/classification , Coronavirus/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Alanine/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacokinetics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Availability , Cell Fusion , Cell Line , Clofazimine/pharmacokinetics , Clofazimine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus/growth & development , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Cricetinae , DNA Helicases/antagonists & inhibitors , Drug Synergism , Female , Humans , Life Cycle Stages/drug effects , Male , Mesocricetus , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Species Specificity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Transcription, Genetic/genetics
11.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 125, 2020 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-654479

ABSTRACT

Stress proteins (SPs) including heat-shock proteins (HSPs), RNA chaperones, and ER associated stress proteins are molecular chaperones essential for cellular homeostasis. The major functions of HSPs include chaperoning misfolded or unfolded polypeptides, protecting cells from toxic stress, and presenting immune and inflammatory cytokines. Regarded as a double-edged sword, HSPs also cooperate with numerous viruses and cancer cells to promote their survival. RNA chaperones are a group of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), which are essential factors for manipulating both the functions and metabolisms of pre-mRNAs/hnRNAs transcribed by RNA polymerase II. hnRNPs involve in a large number of cellular processes, including chromatin remodelling, transcription regulation, RNP assembly and stabilization, RNA export, virus replication, histone-like nucleoid structuring, and even intracellular immunity. Dysregulation of stress proteins is associated with many human diseases including human cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Parkinson's diseases, Alzheimer disease), stroke and infectious diseases. In this review, we summarized the biologic function of stress proteins, and current progress on their mechanisms related to virus reproduction and diseases caused by virus infections. As SPs also attract a great interest as potential antiviral targets (e.g., COVID-19), we also discuss the present progress and challenges in this area of HSP-based drug development, as well as with compounds already under clinical evaluation.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Antiviral Agents/chemical synthesis , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Heat-Shock Proteins/agonists , Heat-Shock Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/agonists , Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Polymerase II/genetics , RNA Polymerase II/metabolism , RNA Precursors/genetics , RNA Precursors/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 109984, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-592505

ABSTRACT

In the current COVID-19 pandemic, prioritizing the immunity enhancers is equally important to anti-virals. Defensins are the forgotten molecules that enhance the innate immunity against various microbes. Although macrolides like azithromycin and clarithromycin etc., have been reported to act against respiratory infections but they lack the ability of immunity enhancement through defensins. The aminoglycosides were proved to have defensin mediated antiviral activity, that could enhance the immunity. So, Consideration of aminoglycosides can be a double edge sword viz., against respiratory infection as well as Immunity enhancer (along with anti-virals) for COVID-19 regimen.


Subject(s)
Aminoglycosides/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Defensins/genetics , Drug Repositioning , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Macrolides/therapeutic use , Aminoglycosides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Codon, Nonsense/drug effects , Defensins/biosynthesis , Defensins/physiology , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Models, Genetic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Virus Internalization
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