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1.
Int J Med Sci ; 17(11): 1522-1531, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647086

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of pneumonia caused by SARS-CoV-2 posed a great threat to global human health, which urgently requires us to understand comprehensively the mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) was identified as a functional receptor for SARS-CoV-2, distribution of which may indicate the risk of different human organs vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Previous studies investigating the distribution of ACE2 mRNA in human tissues only involved a limited size of the samples and a lack of determination for ACE2 protein. Given the heterogeneity among humans, the datasets covering more tissues with a larger size of samples should be analyzed. Indeed, ACE2 is a membrane and secreted protein, while the expression of ACE2 in blood and common blood cells remains unknown. Herein, the proteomic data in HIPED and the antibody-based immunochemistry result in HPA were collected to analyze the distribution of ACE2 protein in human tissues. The bulk RNA-seq profiles from three separate public datasets including HPA tissue Atlas, GTEx, and FANTOM5 CAGE were also obtained to determine the expression of ACE2 in human tissues. Moreover, the abundance of ACE2 in human blood and blood cells was determined by analyzing the data in the PeptideAtlas and the HPA Blood Atlas. We found that the mRNA expression cannot reflect the abundance of ACE2 factor due to the strong differences between mRNA and protein quantities of ACE2 within and across tissues. Our results suggested that ACE2 protein is mainly expressed in the small intestine, kidney, gallbladder, and testis, while the abundance of which in brain-associated tissues and blood common cells is low. HIPED revealed enrichment of ACE2 protein in the placenta and ovary despite a low mRNA level. Further, human secretome shows that the average concentration of ACE2 protein in the plasma of males is higher than those in females. Our research will be beneficial for understanding the transmission routes and sex-based differences in susceptibility of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Betacoronavirus , Databases, Protein , Female , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Male , Mass Spectrometry , Pandemics , Proteomics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA-Seq , Tissue Distribution , Transcriptome
2.
Pathog Dis ; 78(4)2020 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646518

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) around the world has led to a pandemic with high morbidity and mortality. However, there are no effective drugs to prevent and treat the disease. Transcriptome-based drug repositioning, identifying new indications for old drugs, is a powerful tool for drug development. Using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid transcriptome data of COVID-19 patients, we found that the endocytosis and lysosome pathways are highly involved in the disease and that the regulation of genes involved in neutrophil degranulation was disrupted, suggesting an intense battle between SARS-CoV-2 and humans. Furthermore, we implemented a coexpression drug repositioning analysis, cogena, and identified two antiviral drugs (saquinavir and ribavirin) and several other candidate drugs (such as dinoprost, dipivefrine, dexamethasone and (-)-isoprenaline). Notably, the two antiviral drugs have also previously been identified using molecular docking methods, and ribavirin is a recommended drug in the diagnosis and treatment protocol for COVID pneumonia (trial version 5-7) published by the National Health Commission of the P.R. of China. Our study demonstrates the value of the cogena-based drug repositioning method for emerging infectious diseases, improves our understanding of SARS-CoV-2-induced disease, and provides potential drugs for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ribavirin/pharmacology , Saquinavir/pharmacology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry , Cell Degranulation/immunology , Endocytosis/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Lysosomes/immunology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Neutrophil Activation/immunology , Pandemics , Transcriptome
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 121, 2020 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640304
4.
Genes (Basel) ; 11(7)2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640013

ABSTRACT

The global spread of COVID-19, caused by pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) underscores the need for an imminent response from medical research communities to better understand this rapidly spreading infection. Employing multiple bioinformatics and computational pipelines on transcriptome data from primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) during SARS-CoV-2 infection revealed activation of several mechanistic networks, including those involved in immunoglobulin G (IgG) and interferon lambda (IFNL) in host cells. Induction of acute inflammatory response and activation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was prominent in SARS-CoV-2 infected NHBE cells. Additionally, disease and functional analysis employing ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) revealed activation of functional categories related to cell death, while those associated with viral infection and replication were suppressed. Several interferon (IFN) responsive gene targets (IRF9, IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3, IFITM1, MX1, OAS2, OAS3, IFI44 and IFI44L) were highly upregulated in SARS-CoV-2 infected NBHE cell, implying activation of antiviral IFN innate response. Gene ontology and functional annotation of differently expressed genes in patient lung tissues with COVID-19 revealed activation of antiviral response as the hallmark. Mechanistic network analysis in IPA identified 14 common activated, and 9 common suppressed networks in patient tissue, as well as in the NHBE cell model, suggesting a plausible role for these upstream regulator networks in the pathogenesis of COVID-19. Our data revealed expression of several viral proteins in vitro and in patient-derived tissue, while several host-derived long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were identified. Our data highlights activation of IFN response as the main hallmark associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro and in human, and identified several differentially expressed lncRNAs during the course of infection, which could serve as disease biomarkers, while their precise role in the host response to SARS-CoV-2 remains to be investigated.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers/metabolism , Bronchi/cytology , Cell Death , Cell Line , Cluster Analysis , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon-Stimulated Gene Factor 3, gamma Subunit/genetics , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , Transcriptome
5.
Sci Immunol ; 5(49)2020 07 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639363

ABSTRACT

Although most SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals experience mild coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), some patients suffer from severe COVID-19, which is accompanied by acute respiratory distress syndrome and systemic inflammation. To identify factors driving severe progression of COVID-19, we performed single-cell RNA-seq using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors, patients with mild or severe COVID-19, and patients with severe influenza. Patients with COVID-19 exhibited hyper-inflammatory signatures across all types of cells among PBMCs, particularly up-regulation of the TNF/IL-1ß-driven inflammatory response as compared to severe influenza. In classical monocytes from patients with severe COVID-19, type I IFN response co-existed with the TNF/IL-1ß-driven inflammation, and this was not seen in patients with milder COVID-19. Interestingly, we documented type I IFN-driven inflammatory features in patients with severe influenza as well. Based on this, we propose that the type I IFN response plays a pivotal role in exacerbating inflammation in severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Immunophenotyping , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza, Human/immunology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/virology , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA-Seq , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
6.
Fertil Steril ; 114(1): 33-43, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634346

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify cell types in the male and female reproductive systems at risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection because of the expression of host genes and proteins used by the virus for cell entry. DESIGN: Descriptive analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data. SETTING: Academic research department and clinical diagnostic laboratory. PATIENT(S): Not applicable (focus was on previously generated gene and protein expression data). INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Identification of cell types coexpressing the key angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) genes and proteins as well as other candidates potentially involved in SARS-CoV-2 cell entry. RESULT(S): On the basis of single-cell RNA sequencing data, coexpression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 was not detected in testicular cells, including sperm. A subpopulation of oocytes in nonhuman primate ovarian tissue was found to express ACE2 and TMPRSS2, but coexpression was not observed in ovarian somatic cells. RNA expression of TMPRSS2 in 18 samples of human cumulus cells was shown to be low or absent. There was general agreement between publicly available bulk RNA and protein datasets in terms of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression patterns in testis, ovary, endometrial, and placental cells. CONCLUSION(S): These analyses suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection is unlikely to have long-term effects on male and female reproductive function. Although the results cannot be considered definitive, they imply that procedures in which oocytes are collected and fertilized in vitro are associated with very little risk of viral transmission from gametes to embryos and may indeed have the potential to minimize exposure of susceptible reproductive cell types to infection in comparison with natural conception.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Fertility/physiology , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Reproduction/physiology , Virus Internalization , Adolescent , Adult , Animals , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Female , Humans , Macaca fascicularis , Male , Ovary/cytology , Ovary/metabolism , Ovary/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/biosynthesis , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pregnancy , Proteomics/methods , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Testis/cytology , Testis/metabolism , Testis/virology , Transcriptome/physiology , Young Adult
8.
J Infect Dis ; 222(4): 556-563, 2020 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593365

ABSTRACT

Patients who died from COVID-19 often had comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes, and chronic obstructive lung disease. Although angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is crucial for SARS-CoV-2 to bind and enter host cells, no study has systematically assessed the ACE2 expression in the lungs of patients with these diseases. Here, we analyzed over 700 lung transcriptome samples from patients with comorbidities associated with severe COVID-19 and found that ACE2 was highly expressed in these patients compared to control individuals. This finding suggests that patients with such comorbidities may have higher chances of developing severe COVID-19. Correlation and network analyses revealed many potential regulators of ACE2 in the human lung, including genes related to histone modifications, such as HAT1, HDAC2, and KDM5B. Our systems biology approach offers a possible explanation for increased COVID-19 severity in patients with certain comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Lung/enzymology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/genetics , Comorbidity , Coronary Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Disease/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/genetics , Epigenomics , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/genetics , Male , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Systems Biology , Transcriptome
9.
Fertil Steril ; 113(6): 1135-1139, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459476

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus 2 (CoV-2) in seminal fluid of patients recovering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to describe the expression profile of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Transmembrane Serine Protease 2 (TMPRSS2) within the testicle. DESIGN: Observational, cross-sectional study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENT(S): Thirty-four adult Chinese males diagnosed with COVID-19 through confirmatory quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) from pharyngeal swab samples. INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Identification of SARS-CoV-2 on qRT-PCR of single ejaculated semen samples. Semen quality was not assessed. Expression patterns of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in the human testis are explored through previously published single-cell transcriptome datasets. RESULT(S): Six patients (19%) demonstrated scrotal discomfort suggestive of viral orchitis around the time of COVID-19 confirmation. Severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV-2 was not detected in semen after a median of 31 days (interquartile range, 29-36 days) from COVID-19 diagnosis. Single-cell transcriptome analysis demonstrates sparse expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2, with almost no overlapping gene expression. CONCLUSION(S): Severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV-2 was not detected in the semen of patients recovering from COVID-19 1 month after COVID-19 diagnosis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-mediated viral entry of SARS-CoV-2 into target host cells is unlikely to occur within the human testicle based on ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression. The long-term effects of SARS-CoV-2 on male reproductive function remain unknown.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Semen/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , RNA-Seq , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Testis/enzymology , Testis/virology , Time Factors , Transcriptome , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
10.
Sci Adv ; 6(25): eabb5813, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-619103

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak has become a global health risk, and understanding the response of the host to the SARS-CoV-2 virus will help to combat the disease. RNA editing by host deaminases is an innate restriction process to counter virus infection, but it is not yet known whether this process operates against coronaviruses. Here, we analyze RNA sequences from bronchoalveolar lavage fluids obtained from coronavirus-infected patients. We identify nucleotide changes that may be signatures of RNA editing: adenosine-to-inosine changes from ADAR deaminases and cytosine-to-uracil changes from APOBEC deaminases. Mutational analysis of genomes from different strains of Coronaviridae from human hosts reveals mutational patterns consistent with those observed in the transcriptomic data. However, the reduced ADAR signature in these data raises the possibility that ADARs might be more effective than APOBECs in restricting viral propagation. Our results thus suggest that both APOBECs and ADARs are involved in coronavirus genome editing, a process that may shape the fate of both virus and patient.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , RNA Editing/genetics , Transcriptome , APOBEC Deaminases/genetics , APOBEC Deaminases/metabolism , Adenosine Deaminase/genetics , Adenosine Deaminase/metabolism , Base Sequence/genetics , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Mutation Rate , Nucleotides/genetics , Nucleotides/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Virus Replication/genetics
11.
Autoimmun Rev ; 19(7): 102571, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-155063

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) disease (COVID-19) has posed a serious threat to global health. As no specific therapeutics are yet available to control disease evolution, more in-depth understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms induced by SARS-CoV-2 will help to characterize new targets for the management of COVID-19. The present study identified a specific set of biological pathways altered in primary human lung epithelium upon SARS-CoV-2 infection, and a comparison with SARS-CoV from the 2003 pandemic was studied. The transcriptomic profiles were also exploited as possible novel therapeutic targets, and anti-signature perturbation analysis predicted potential drugs to control disease progression. Among them, Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), serine-threonine kinase (AKT), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and I kappa B Kinase (IKK) inhibitors emerged as candidate drugs. Finally, sex-specific differences that may underlie the higher COVID-19 mortality in men are proposed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Sex Factors , Betacoronavirus , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Drug Discovery , Epithelial Cells/virology , Female , Humans , Lung/cytology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases , Transcriptome
12.
Inflamm Bowel Dis ; 26(6): 797-808, 2020 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-116826

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have intestinal inflammation and are treated with immune-modulating medications. In the face of the coronavirus disease-19 pandemic, we do not know whether patients with IBD will be more susceptible to infection or disease. We hypothesized that the viral entry molecules angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) are expressed in the intestine. We further hypothesized that their expression could be affected by inflammation or medication usage. METHODS: We examined the expression of Ace2 and Tmprss2 by quantitative polymerase chain reacion in animal models of IBD. Publicly available data from organoids and mucosal biopsies from patients with IBD were examined for expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2. We conducted RNA sequencing for CD11b-enriched cells and peripheral and lamina propria T-cells from well-annotated patient samples. RESULTS: ACE2 and TMPRSS2 were abundantly expressed in the ileum and colon and had high expression in intestinal epithelial cells. In animal models, inflammation led to downregulation of epithelial Ace2. Expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 was not increased in samples from patients with compared with those of control patients. In CD11b-enriched cells but not T-cells, the level of expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in the mucosa was comparable to other functional mucosal genes and was not affected by inflammation. Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs, vedolizumab, ustekinumab, and steroids were linked to significantly lower expression of ACE2 in CD11b-enriched cells. CONCLUSIONS: The viral entry molecules ACE2 and TMPRSS2 are expressed in the ileum and colon. Patients with IBD do not have higher expression during inflammation; medical therapy is associated with lower levels of ACE2. These data provide reassurance for patients with IBD.


Subject(s)
Gene Expression Regulation , Immunosuppressive Agents/pharmacology , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/physiopathology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Animals , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Biopsy , Colon/drug effects , Colon/metabolism , Computational Biology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Humans , Ileum/drug effects , Ileum/metabolism , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Inflammation/physiopathology , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Irritable Bowel Syndrome/drug therapy , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Transcriptome , Young Adult
13.
Cell ; 181(4): 914-921.e10, 2020 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-108856

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a betacoronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the SARS-CoV-2 genome was reported recently, its transcriptomic architecture is unknown. Utilizing two complementary sequencing techniques, we present a high-resolution map of the SARS-CoV-2 transcriptome and epitranscriptome. DNA nanoball sequencing shows that the transcriptome is highly complex owing to numerous discontinuous transcription events. In addition to the canonical genomic and 9 subgenomic RNAs, SARS-CoV-2 produces transcripts encoding unknown ORFs with fusion, deletion, and/or frameshift. Using nanopore direct RNA sequencing, we further find at least 41 RNA modification sites on viral transcripts, with the most frequent motif, AAGAA. Modified RNAs have shorter poly(A) tails than unmodified RNAs, suggesting a link between the modification and the 3' tail. Functional investigation of the unknown transcripts and RNA modifications discovered in this study will open new directions to our understanding of the life cycle and pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics , Transcriptome , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epigenesis, Genetic , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Vero Cells
14.
Fertil Steril ; 113(6): 1135-1139, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72246

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus 2 (CoV-2) in seminal fluid of patients recovering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to describe the expression profile of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Transmembrane Serine Protease 2 (TMPRSS2) within the testicle. DESIGN: Observational, cross-sectional study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENT(S): Thirty-four adult Chinese males diagnosed with COVID-19 through confirmatory quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) from pharyngeal swab samples. INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Identification of SARS-CoV-2 on qRT-PCR of single ejaculated semen samples. Semen quality was not assessed. Expression patterns of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in the human testis are explored through previously published single-cell transcriptome datasets. RESULT(S): Six patients (19%) demonstrated scrotal discomfort suggestive of viral orchitis around the time of COVID-19 confirmation. Severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV-2 was not detected in semen after a median of 31 days (interquartile range, 29-36 days) from COVID-19 diagnosis. Single-cell transcriptome analysis demonstrates sparse expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2, with almost no overlapping gene expression. CONCLUSION(S): Severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV-2 was not detected in the semen of patients recovering from COVID-19 1 month after COVID-19 diagnosis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-mediated viral entry of SARS-CoV-2 into target host cells is unlikely to occur within the human testicle based on ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression. The long-term effects of SARS-CoV-2 on male reproductive function remain unknown.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Semen/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , RNA-Seq , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Testis/enzymology , Testis/virology , Time Factors , Transcriptome , Virus Internalization , Young Adult
15.
PLoS One ; 15(4): e0230295, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-73406

ABSTRACT

The new type of pneumonia caused by the SARS-CoV-2 (Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) has been declared as a global public health concern by WHO. As of April 3, 2020, more than 1,000,000 human infections have been diagnosed around the world, which exhibited apparent person-to-person transmission characteristics of this virus. The capacity of vertical transmission in SARS-CoV-2 remains controversial recently. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is now confirmed as the receptor of SARS-CoV-2 and plays essential roles in human infection and transmission. In present study, we collected the online available single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) data to evaluate the cell specific expression of ACE2 in maternal-fetal interface as well as in multiple fetal organs. Our results revealed that ACE2 was highly expressed in maternal-fetal interface cells including stromal cells and perivascular cells of decidua, and cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast in placenta. Meanwhile, ACE2 was also expressed in specific cell types of human fetal heart, liver and lung, but not in kidney. And in a study containing series fetal and post-natal mouse lung, we observed ACE2 was dynamically changed over the time, and ACE2 was extremely high in neonatal mice at post-natal day 1~3. In summary, this study revealed that the SARS-CoV-2 receptor was widely spread in specific cell types of maternal-fetal interface and fetal organs. And thus, both the vertical transmission and the placenta dysfunction/abortion caused by SARS-CoV-2 need to be further carefully investigated in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Maternal-Fetal Relations , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , SARS Virus/metabolism , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Humans , Mice , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcriptome
16.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 761-770, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-29222

ABSTRACT

Circulating in China and 158 other countries and areas, the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak has caused devastating mortality and posed a great threat to public health. However, efforts to identify effectively supportive therapeutic drugs and treatments has been hampered by our limited understanding of host immune response for this fatal disease. To characterize the transcriptional signatures of host inflammatory response to SARS-CoV-2 (HCoV-19) infection, we carried out transcriptome sequencing of the RNAs isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) specimens of COVID-19 patients. Our results reveal distinct host inflammatory cytokine profiles to SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients, and highlight the association between COVID-19 pathogenesis and excessive cytokine release such as CCL2/MCP-1, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL3/MIP-1A, and CCL4/MIP1B. Furthermore, SARS-CoV-2 induced activation of apoptosis and P53 signalling pathway in lymphocytes may be the cause of patients' lymphopenia. The transcriptome dataset of COVID-19 patients would be a valuable resource for clinical guidance on anti-inflammatory medication and understanding the molecular mechansims of host response.


Subject(s)
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , Chemokines/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Cytokines/analysis , Leukocytes, Mononuclear , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Transcriptome , Apoptosis , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Humans , Lymphopenia , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , RNA-Seq , Signal Transduction , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
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