Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Int J Infect Dis ; 116: 74-79, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587623

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Mounting evidence links hyperinflammation in gravely ill patients to low serum iron levels and hyperferritinemia. However, little attention has been paid to other iron-associated markers such as transferrin. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of different iron parameters in severe COVID-19 and their relation to disease severity. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This study involved 73 hospitalized patients with positive test results for SARS-CoV-2. Patients were classified into two groups according to symptom severity: mild and severe. Blood levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and iron-related biomarkers were measured. RESULTS: The results revealed a significant increase in IL-6, CRP, and ferritin levels and decreased transferrin and iron levels in severe COVID-19. Transferrin negatively predicted variations in IgM and IgG levels (P < 0.001), as well as 34.4% and 36.6% increase in IL-6 and CRP levels, respectively (P < 0.005). Importantly, transferrin was the main negative predictor of ferritin levels, determining 22.7% of serum variations (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Reduced serum transferrin and iron levels, along with the increased CRP and high ferritin, were strongly associated with the heightened inflammatory and immune state in COVID-19. Transferrin can be used as a valuable predictor of increased severity and progression of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transferrin , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Inflammation , SARS-CoV-2 , Transferrin/analysis , Transferrin/metabolism
2.
Metallomics ; 13(6)2021 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387958

ABSTRACT

This report provides perspectives concerning dual roles of serum ferritin as a measure of both iron status and inflammation. We suggest benefits of a lower range of serum ferritin as has occurred for total serum cholesterol and fasting blood glucose levels. Observations during a prospective randomized study using phlebotomy in patients with peripheral arterial disease offered unique insights into dual roles of serum ferritin both as an iron status marker and acute phase reactant. Robust positive associations between serum ferritin, interleukin 6 [IL-6], tissue necrosis factor-alpha, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein were discovered. Elevated serum ferritin and IL-6 levels associated with increased mortality and with reduced mortality at ferritin levels <100 ng mL-1. Epidemiologic studies demonstrate similar outcomes. Extremely elevated ferritin and IL-6 levels also occur in individuals with high mortality due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Disordered iron metabolism reflected by a high range of serum ferritin level signals disease severity and outcomes. Based upon experimental and epidemiologic data, we suggest testing the hypotheses that optimal ferritin levels for cardiovascular mortality reduction range from 20 to 100 ng mL-1 with % transferrin levels from 20 to 50%, to ensure adequate iron status and that ferritin levels above 194 ng mL-1 associate with all-cause mortality in population cohorts.


Subject(s)
Ferritins/blood , Inflammation/blood , Iron/blood , Peripheral Arterial Disease/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Phlebotomy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transferrin/analysis
3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 13431, 2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286474

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging infectious disease that leads to severe respiratory failure (RF). It is known that host exposure to viral infection triggers an iron-lowering response to mitigate pathogenic load and tissue damage. However, the association between host iron-lowering response and COVID-19 severity is not clear. This two-center observational study of 136 adult hospitalized COVID-19 patients analyzed the association between disease severity and initial serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and transferrin saturation (TSAT) levels. Serum iron levels were significantly lower in patients with mild RF than in the non-RF group; however, there were no significant differences in iron levels between the non-RF and severe RF groups, depicting a U-shaped association between serum iron levels and disease severity. TIBC levels decreased significantly with increasing severity; consequently, TSAT was significantly higher in patients with severe RF than in other patients. Multivariate analysis including only patients with RF adjusted for age and sex demonstrated that higher serum iron and TSAT levels were independently associated with the development of severe RF, indicating that inadequate response to lower serum iron might be an exacerbating factor for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Iron/blood , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Hospitalization , Humans , Iron/metabolism , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Transferrin/analysis
4.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 43 Suppl 1: 142-151, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069396

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Studies have shown that iron metabolism is affected by coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), which has spread worldwide and has become a global health problem. Our study aimed to evaluate the relationship between COVID-19 and serum erythropoietin (EPO), hepcidin, and haptoglobin (Hpt) levels with disease severity, and other biochemical values. METHODS: Fifty nine COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) and wards in our hospital between March and June 2020 and 19 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Participants were divided into mild, severe, and critical disease severity groups. Group mean values were analyzed with SPSS according to disease severity, mortality, and intubation status. RESULTS: Hemoglobin (Hb) levels were significantly lower in the critical patient group (P < .0001) and deceased group (P < .0001). The red blood cell distribution width-coefficient of variation (RDW-CV) and ferritin values were significantly higher in the intubated (P = .001, P = .005) and deceased (P = .014, P = .003) groups. Ferritin values were positively correlated with disease severity (P < .0001). Serum iron levels were lower in the patient group compared with the reference range. (P < .0001). It was found that the transferrin saturation (TfSat) was lower in the patient group compared with the control group (P < .0001). It was found that the mean EPO of the deceased was lower than the control group and the survived patient group (P = .035). Hepcidin levels were found to be significantly lower in the patient group (P < .0001). Hpt values were found to be significantly lower in the intubated group (P = .004) and the deceased group (P = .042). CONCLUSION: In our study, while serum iron and hepcidin levels decreased in patients diagnosed with COVID-19, we found that EPO and Hpt levels were significantly lower in critical and deceased patient groups. Our study is the first study examining EPO and Hpt levels in patients diagnosed with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Erythropoietin/blood , Haptoglobins/analysis , Hepcidins/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Biomarkers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Ferritins/blood , Hemoglobins/analysis , Homeostasis , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Iron/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Transferrin/analysis
5.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 35(8): 763-773, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725658

ABSTRACT

Iron metabolism and anemia may play an important role in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate biomarkers of anemia and iron metabolism (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin, soluble transferrin receptor, hepcidin, haptoglobin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, erythropoietin, free erythrocyte protoporphyrine, and erythrocyte indices) in patients diagnosed with COVID-19, and explored their prognostic value. Six bibliographic databases were searched up to August 3rd 2020. We included 189 unique studies, with data from 57,563 COVID-19 patients. Pooled mean hemoglobin and ferritin levels in COVID-19 patients across all ages were 129.7 g/L (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 128.51; 130.88) and 777.33 ng/mL (95% CI, 701.33; 852.77), respectively. Hemoglobin levels were lower with older age, higher percentage of subjects with diabetes, hypertension and overall comorbidities, and admitted to intensive care. Ferritin level increased with older age, increasing proportion of hypertensive study participants, and increasing proportion of mortality. Compared to moderate cases, severe COVID-19 cases had lower hemoglobin [weighted mean difference (WMD), - 4.08 g/L (95% CI - 5.12; - 3.05)] and red blood cell count [WMD, - 0.16 × 1012 /L (95% CI - 0.31; - 0.014)], and higher ferritin [WMD, - 473.25 ng/mL (95% CI 382.52; 563.98)] and red cell distribution width [WMD, 1.82% (95% CI 0.10; 3.55)]. A significant difference in mean ferritin levels of 606.37 ng/mL (95% CI 461.86; 750.88) was found between survivors and non-survivors, but not in hemoglobin levels. Future studies should explore the impact of iron metabolism and anemia in the pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anemia/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus/metabolism , Iron/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/analysis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Erythropoietin , Ferritins/blood , Hemoglobins/analysis , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Hepcidins/blood , Hepcidins/metabolism , Humans , Iron/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Receptors, Transferrin/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Transferrin/analysis , Transferrin/metabolism
6.
World J Emerg Surg ; 15(1): 41, 2020 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-618185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Iron metabolism and immune response to SARS-CoV-2 have not been described yet in intensive care patients, although they are likely involved in Covid-19 pathogenesis. METHODS: We performed an observational study during the peak of pandemic in our intensive care unit, dosing D-dimer, C-reactive protein, troponin T, lactate dehydrogenase, ferritin, serum iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation, transferrin soluble receptor, lymphocyte count and NK, CD3, CD4, CD8 and B subgroups of 31 patients during the first 2 weeks of their ICU stay. Correlation with mortality and severity at the time of admission was tested with the Spearman coefficient and Mann-Whitney test. Trends over time were tested with the Kruskal-Wallis analysis. RESULTS: Lymphopenia is severe and constant, with a nadir on day 2 of ICU stay (median 0.555 109/L; interquartile range (IQR) 0.450 109/L); all lymphocytic subgroups are dramatically reduced in critically ill patients, while CD4/CD8 ratio remains normal. Neither ferritin nor lymphocyte count follows significant trends in ICU patients. Transferrin saturation is extremely reduced at ICU admission (median 9%; IQR 7%), then significantly increases at days 3 to 6 (median 33%, IQR 26.5%, p value 0.026). The same trend is observed with serum iron levels (median 25.5 µg/L, IQR 69 µg/L at admission; median 73 µg/L, IQR 56 µg/L on days 3 to 6) without reaching statistical significance. Hyperferritinemia is constant during intensive care stay: however, its dosage might be helpful in individuating patients developing haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. D-dimer is elevated and progressively increases from admission (median 1319 µg/L; IQR 1285 µg/L) to days 3 to 6 (median 6820 µg/L; IQR 6619 µg/L), despite not reaching significant results. We describe trends of all the abovementioned parameters during ICU stay. CONCLUSIONS: The description of iron metabolism and lymphocyte count in Covid-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit provided with this paper might allow a wider understanding of SARS-CoV-2 pathophysiology.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Iron/metabolism , Lymphocytes/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Correlation of Data , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Italy/epidemiology , Lymphocyte Count/methods , Lymphocyte Subsets , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Transferrin/analysis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL