Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.046
Filter
2.
Clin Chem ; 68(7): 953-962, 2022 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2188630

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA detection in the nasopharynx is considered a biomarker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We evaluated its performance as a reflex test to triage EBV seropositives within an NPC screening program in China. METHODS: The study population was embedded within an ongoing NPC screening trial and included 1111 participants who screened positive for anti-EBV VCA (antibodies against EBV capsid antigens)/EBNA1 (EBV nuclear antigen1)-IgA antibodies (of 18 237 screened). Nasopharynx swabs were collected/tested for EBNA1 gene EBV DNA load. We evaluated performance of EBV DNA in the nasopharynx swab as a reflex test to triage EBV serological high-risk (those referred to endoscopy/MRI) and medium-risk (those referred to accelerated screening) individuals. RESULTS: By the end of 2019, we detected 20 NPC cases from 317 serological high-risk individuals and 4 NPC cases from 794 medium-risk individuals. When used to triage serological high-risk individuals, nasopharynx swab EBV DNA was detected in 19/20 cases (positivity rate among cases: 95.0%; 95% CI, 75.1%-99.9%), with a referral rate of 63.4% (201/317, 95% CI, 57.8%-68.7%) and NPC detection rate among positives of 9.5% (19/201, 95% CI, 5.8%-14.4%). The performance of an algorithm that combined serology with triage of serology high-risk individuals using EBV DNA testing yielded a sensitivity of 72.4% (95% CI, 3.0%-81.4%) and specificity of 97.6% (95% CI, 97.2%-97.9%). When used to triage EBV serological medium-risk individuals, the positivity rate among cases was 75.0% (95% CI, 19.4%-99.4%), with a referral rate of 61.8% (95% CI, 58.4%-65.2%) and NPC detection rate among positives of 0.6% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.8%). CONCLUSIONS: Nasopharynx swab EBV DNA showed promise as a reflex test to triage serology high-risk individuals, reducing referral by ca. 40% with little reduction in sensitivity compared to a serology-only screening program.


Subject(s)
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections , Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma , Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms , Antibodies, Viral , DNA , DNA, Viral , Epstein-Barr Virus Infections/diagnosis , Herpesvirus 4, Human/genetics , Humans , Immunoglobulin A , Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma/diagnosis , Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Nasopharynx , Reflex , Triage
3.
Curr Opin Crit Care ; 28(6): 674-680, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152246

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the way we had to approach hospital- and intensive care unit (ICU)-related resource management, especially for demanding techniques required for advanced support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). RECENT FINDINGS: Availability of ICU beds and ECMO machines widely varies around the world. In critical conditions, such a global pandemic, the establishment of contingency capacity tiers might help in defining to which conditions and subjects ECMO can be offered. A frequent reassessment of the resource saturation, possibly integrated within a regional healthcare coordination system, may be of help to triage the patients who most likely will benefit from advanced techniques, especially when capacities are limited. SUMMARY: Indications to ECMO during the pandemic should be fluid and may be adjusted over time. Candidacy of patients should follow the same prepandemic rules, taking into account the acute disease, the burden of any eventual comorbidity and the chances of a good quality of life after recovery; but the current capacity of healthcare system should also be considered, and frequently reassessed, possibly within a wide hub-and-spoke healthcare system. VIDEO ABSTRACT: http://links.lww.com/COCC/A43.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Triage , SARS-CoV-2 , Patient Selection , Quality of Life
4.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 22(6): 539-543, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2145158

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a dramatic increase in acutely ill patients presenting to hospitals with life-threatening acute respiratory disease. There was an immediate need for effective triage systems to facilitate clinical decision making. This review assesses the performance of the National Early Warning Score 2 (NEWS2) in two contexts. Firstly, the ability to detect acute illness severity and likely clinical deterioration in patients presenting to hospitals with COVID-19. Secondly, the use of NEWS2 in the longitudinal monitoring to detect acute clinical deterioration in hospitalised patients with COVID-19. NEWS2 appeared to be at least comparable and, often, superior to other scoring systems (such as qSOFA and CURB-65), and provided an earlier alert of deterioration. A NEWS2 of 5 had high short-term sensitivity within and was unlikely to miss patients with COVID-19 who go on to deteriorate, but this comes with moderate specificity. However, the specificity of these systems is likely underestimated because preventing deterioration is their purpose.NEWS2 is an adjunct to clinical decision making and has served that purpose during the COVID-19 pandemic, playing an important role in communicating illness severity, clinical deterioration, triaging patients to appropriate levels of care and prompting completion of treatment escalation plans for those with high scores and at imminent risk of deterioration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Deterioration , Humans , Pandemics , Triage/methods
5.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(11): 1779-1784, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144253

ABSTRACT

Background and Aim: Whether to send COVID-19 patients home with quarantine measures or to hospitalize and treat them on an inpatient basis is a very important decision in the treatment of COVID-19 patients. This study aimed to introduce a scoring system that will enable making decisions on inpatient or outpatient treatment of patients by scoring their symptoms, clinical, radiological, and laboratory results during the initial assessment. Materials and Methods: Data of patients over 18 years of age, examined for COVID-19 between March 11, 2020, and May 31, 2020, and who had a positive PCR result, and their radiological (computed tomography reports) and blood test (complete blood count, blood gas and laboratory results) results were recorded to develop our scoring system. Results: A comparison of COVID-19 patients, who received outpatient and inpatient treatments by age variable, revealed a significant result (P < 0.001). The comparison of laboratory results showed a significant difference between both groups (P < 0.001). The comparison of the groups by the presence of comorbidity also revealed a significant result (P < 0.001). According to the scoring system that we developed (Cebeci score), a score of 5 points and above had a specificity of 81% and a sensitivity of 88% for indicating the probability of receiving inpatient treatment. Conclusion: We believe that the scoring system we developed will be a simple, practical, and leading guide for physicians to avoid dilemmas regarding the issue of whether to quarantine patients at home or to hospitalize them in order to use medical resources effectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , Humans , Adolescent , Adult , Triage/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Decision Making , Ambulatory Care , Hospitalization
6.
Crit Care Med ; 50(12): 1714-1724, 2022 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135628

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Simulation and evaluation of a prioritization protocol at a German university hospital using a convergent parallel mixed methods design. DESIGN: Prospective single-center cohort study with a quantitative analysis of ICU patients and qualitative content analysis of two focus groups with intensivists. SETTING: Five ICUs of internal medicine and anesthesiology at a German university hospital. PATIENTS: Adult critically ill ICU patients ( n = 53). INTERVENTIONS: After training the attending senior ICU physicians ( n = 13) in rationing, an impending ICU congestion was simulated. All ICU patients were rated according to their likelihood to survive their acute illness (good-moderate-unfavorable). From each ICU, the two patients with the most unfavorable prognosis ( n = 10) were evaluated by five prioritization teams for triage. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients nominated for prioritization visit ( n = 10) had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores and already a longer stay at the hospital and on the ICU compared with the other patients. The order within this worst prognosis group was not congruent between the five teams. However, an in-hospital mortality of 80% confirmed the reasonable match with the lowest predicted probability of survival. Qualitative data highlighted the tremendous burden of triage and the need for a team-based consensus-oriented decision-making approach to ensure best possible care and to support professionals. Transparent communication within the teams, the hospital, and to the public was seen as essential for prioritization implementation. CONCLUSIONS: To mitigate potential bias and to reduce the emotional burden of triage, a consensus-oriented, interdisciplinary, and collaborative approach should be implemented. Prognostic comparative assessment by intensivists is feasible. The combination of long-term ICU stay and consistently high Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores resulted in a greater risk for triage in patients. It remains challenging to reliably differentiate between patients with very low chances to survive and requires further conceptual and empirical research.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Triage , Adult , Humans , Triage/methods , Prospective Studies , Cohort Studies , Intensive Care Units
7.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(8): 1572-1576, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2101071

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the discrepancy in terms of history related to coronavirus disease-2019 and symptoms given in the pre-clinic triage and to the doctor attending the patient in a gastroenterology clinic. METHODS: The observational study was conducted from September 2020 to January 2021 at the Gastroenterology outpatient department of Dr Ziauddin Hospital's Clifton unit in Karachi, and comprised all patients visiting the facility regardless of age and gender. Data was collected using a questionnaire that was first filled up by the receptionist outside the clinic and was then administered again once the patient entered the clinic. Discrepancy on the answers was then checked and associations were determined with clinical assessment. Data was analysed using SPSS 20. RESULTS: Of the 300 patients, 184(61.3%) were males and 116(38.6%) were females. The overall mean age was 55 ± 16.98 (range: 18-92 years). Discrepancy between pre-clinic and in-clinic self-reported data was significant for fever, cough, fatigue, headache, body ache, diarrhoea, sore throat, loss of sense of smell/taste, shortness of breath, and contact with someone positive for coronavirus disease-2019 was significant (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Patients were found to be afraid of getting barred from seeing a consultant, had fear of hospital-based isolation or were in denial regarding the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastroenterology , Male , Female , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Triage , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics
9.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 80, 2020 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid access to emergency medical communication centers (EMCCs) is pivotal to address potentially life-threatening conditions. Maintaining public access to EMCCs without delay is crucial in case of disease outbreak despite the significant increased activity and the difficulties to mobilize extra staff resources. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of two-level filtering on EMCC performance during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: A before-after monocentric prospective study was conducted at the EMCC at the Nantes University Hospital. Using telephone activity data, we compared EMCC performance during 2 periods. In period one (February 27th to March 11th 2020), call takers managed calls as usual, gathering basic information from the caller and giving first aid instructions to a bystander on scene if needed. During period two (March 12th to March 25th 2020), calls were answered by a first-line call taker to identify potentially serious conditions that required immediate dispatch. When a serious condition was excluded, the call was immediately transferred to a second-line call taker who managed the call as usual so the first-line call taker could be rapidly available for other incoming calls. The primary outcome was the quality of service at 20 s (QS20), corresponding to the rate of calls answered within 20 s. We described activity and outcome measures by hourly range. We compared EMCC performance during periods one and two using an interrupted time series analysis. RESULTS: We analyzed 45,451 incoming calls during the two study periods: 21,435 during period 1 and 24,016 during period 2. Between the two study periods, we observed a significant increase in the number of incoming calls per hour, the number of connected call takers and average call duration. A linear regression model, adjusted for these confounding variables, showed a significant increase in the QS20 slope (from - 0.4 to 1.4%, p = 0.01), highlighting the significant impact of two-level filtering on the quality of service. CONCLUSIONS: We found that rapid access to our EMCC was maintained during the COVID-19 pandemic via two-level filtering. This system helped reduce the time gap between call placement and first-line call-taker evaluation of a potentially life-threatening situation. We suggest implementing this system when an EMCC faces significantly increased activity with limited staff resources.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergencies , Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems/organization & administration , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Triage/methods , COVID-19 , Controlled Before-After Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone
10.
World Neurosurg ; 144: e710-e713, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has set a huge challenge to the delivery of neurosurgical services, including the transfer of patients. We aimed to share our strategy in handling neurosurgical emergencies at a remote center in Borneo island. Our objectives included discussing the logistic and geographic challenges faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Miri General Hospital is a remote center in Sarawak, Malaysia, serving a population with difficult access to neurosurgical services. Two neurosurgeons were stationed here on a rotational basis every fortnight during the pandemic to handle neurosurgical cases. Patients were triaged depending on their urgent needs for surgery or transfer to a neurosurgical center and managed accordingly. All patients were screened for potential risk of contracting COVID-19 prior to the surgery. Based on this, the level of personal protective equipment required for the health care workers involved was determined. RESULTS: During the initial 6 weeks of the Movement Control Order in Malaysia, there were 50 urgent neurosurgical consultations. Twenty patients (40%) required emergency surgery or intervention. There were 9 vascular (45%), 5 trauma (25%), 4 tumor (20%), and 2 hydrocephalus cases (10%). Eighteen patients were operated at Miri General Hospital, among whom 17 (94.4%) survived. Ninety percent of anticipated transfers were avoided. None of the medical staff acquired COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: This framework allowed timely intervention for neurosurgical emergencies (within a safe limit), minimized transfer, and enabled uninterrupted neurosurgical services at a remote center with difficult access to neurosurgical care during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms/surgery , Craniocerebral Trauma/surgery , Emergencies , Hemorrhagic Stroke/surgery , Hydrocephalus/surgery , Neurosurgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Patient Transfer/statistics & numerical data , Air Ambulances , Borneo/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations/surgery , Female , Hospitals, General , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Personal Protective Equipment , Skull Base Neoplasms/surgery , Transportation of Patients , Triage
11.
Health Secur ; 20(S1): S71-S84, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097250

ABSTRACT

In fall 2020, COVID-19 infections accelerated across the United States. For many states, a surge in COVID-19 cases meant planning for the allocation of scarce resources. Crisis standards of care planning focuses on maintaining high-quality clinical care amid extreme operating conditions. One of the primary goals of crisis standards of care planning is to use all preventive measures available to avoid reaching crisis conditions and the complex triage decisionmaking involved therein. Strategies to stay out of crisis must respond to the actual experience of people on the frontlines, or the "ground truth," to ensure efforts to increase critical care bed numbers and augment staff, equipment, supplies, and medications to provide an effective response to a public health emergency. Successful management of a surge event where healthcare needs exceed capacity requires coordinated strategies for scarce resource allocation. In this article, we examine the ground truth challenges encountered in response efforts during the fall surge of 2020 for 2 states-Nebraska and California-and the strategies each state used to enable healthcare facilities to stay out of crisis standards of care. Through these 2 cases, we identify key tools deployed to reduce surge and barriers to coordinated statewide support of the healthcare infrastructure. Finally, we offer considerations for operationalizing key tools to alleviate surge and recommendations for stronger statewide coordination in future public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Resource Allocation , Surge Capacity , Triage , United States
12.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 18126, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096796

ABSTRACT

The development of tools that provide early triage of COVID-19 patients with minimal use of diagnostic tests, based on easily accessible data, can be of vital importance in reducing COVID-19 mortality rates during high-incidence scenarios. This work proposes a machine learning model to predict mortality and risk of hospitalization using both 2 simple demographic features and 19 comorbidities obtained from 86,867 electronic medical records of COVID-19 patients, and a new method (LR-IPIP) designed to deal with data imbalance problems. The model was able to predict with high accuracy (90-93%, ROC-AUC = 0.94) the patient's final status (deceased or discharged), while its accuracy was medium (71-73%, ROC-AUC = 0.75) with respect to the risk of hospitalization. The most relevant characteristics for these models were age, sex, number of comorbidities, osteoarthritis, obesity, depression, and renal failure. Finally, to facilitate its use by clinicians, a user-friendly website has been developed ( https://alejandrocisterna.shinyapps.io/PROVIA ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , ROC Curve , Hospitalization , Triage/methods
15.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(42): e31278, 2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087899

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a major challenge for global healthcare systems. Early and safe triage in the emergency department (ED) is crucial for proper therapy. However, differential diagnosis remains challenging. Rapid antigen testing (RAT) may help to improve early triage and patient safety. We performed a retrospective study of 234 consecutive patients with suspected COVID-19 who presented to our ED in November 2020. All underwent SARS-CoV-2-nasopharyngeal swab testing using both RAT and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The inpatient treatment was established according to an empirically developed triage algorithm. The accuracy of the suggested algorithm was analyzed based on the rate of outpatients returning within 7 days and inpatients staying for less than 48 hours. COVID-19 inpatients and outpatients were compared for symptoms, vital signs, and C-reactive protein levels. Of the 221 included patients with suspected COVID-19 infection, the diagnosis could be confirmed in 120 patients (54.3%) by a positive RT-PCR result, whereas only 72% of those had a positive antigen test. Of the 56 COVID-19 outpatients, three returned within 7 days with the need for hospital treatment due to clinical deterioration. Among the 64 COVID-19 inpatients, 4 were discharged within 48 hours, whereas 60 stayed longer (mean duration 10.2 days). The suggested triage algorithm was safe and efficient in the first 234 consecutive patients. RAT can confirm a diagnosis in 72% of PCR proven COVID-19 patients and allows early cohort isolation as an important way to save hospital capacity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Triage , Retrospective Studies , Case-Control Studies , C-Reactive Protein , Emergency Service, Hospital , Algorithms , Polymerase Chain Reaction
16.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 17458, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077114

ABSTRACT

An important element in the effective treatment of patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus during the pandemic is an effective early triage to determine patient allocation and in-patient therapy. This paper assesses the prognostic value of capillary blood gas tests in predicting extended hospitalisation and death due to COVID-19. This retrospective statistical research is based on a group of 200 patients, hospitalised from 15 October 2020 to 08 March 2021. The study utilised the treatment documentation of these patients hospitalised due to COVID-19 at the Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Centre in Bystra (Southern Poland) during this period. The hospital has 50 beds with access to oxygen for COVID-19 patients and a five-bed intensive care unit. On the basis of the obtained results, conclusions were drawn that the need for early oxygen therapy with an oxygen mask and low pH values in capillary blood are significant risk factors for prolonging hospitalisation due to COVID-19. Age, the need for early oxygen mask therapy and low oxygen saturation are important risk factors for death from COVID-19. Capillary blood gas analysis is a simple and effective method of early in-patient segregation of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage , Retrospective Studies , Hospitalization , Oxygen
17.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 17466, 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077110

ABSTRACT

Emergency departments (EDs) are experiencing complex demands. An ED triage tool, the Score for Emergency Risk Prediction (SERP), was previously developed using an interpretable machine learning framework. It achieved a good performance in the Singapore population. We aimed to externally validate the SERP in a Korean cohort for all ED patients and compare its performance with Korean triage acuity scale (KTAS). This retrospective cohort study included all adult ED patients of Samsung Medical Center from 2016 to 2020. The outcomes were 30-day and in-hospital mortality after the patients' ED visit. We used the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) to assess the performance of the SERP and other conventional scores, including KTAS. The study population included 285,523 ED visits, of which 53,541 were after the COVID-19 outbreak (2020). The whole cohort, in-hospital, and 30 days mortality rates were 1.60%, and 3.80%. The SERP achieved an AUROC of 0.821 and 0.803, outperforming KTAS of 0.679 and 0.729 for in-hospital and 30-day mortality, respectively. SERP was superior to other scores for in-hospital and 30-day mortality prediction in an external validation cohort. SERP is a generic, intuitive, and effective triage tool to stratify general patients who present to the emergency department.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , Adult , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Machine Learning
19.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 10(9): e38364, 2022 09 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054780

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Symptom checkers are clinical decision support apps for patients, used by tens of millions of people annually. They are designed to provide diagnostic and triage advice and assist users in seeking the appropriate level of care. Little evidence is available regarding their diagnostic and triage accuracy with direct use by patients for urgent conditions. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic and triage accuracy and usability of a symptom checker in use by patients presenting to an emergency department (ED). METHODS: We recruited a convenience sample of English-speaking patients presenting for care in an urban ED. Each consenting patient used a leading symptom checker from Ada Health before the ED evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by comparing the symptom checker's diagnoses and those of 3 independent emergency physicians viewing the patient-entered symptom data, with the final diagnoses from the ED evaluation. The Ada diagnoses and triage were also critiqued by the independent physicians. The patients completed a usability survey based on the Technology Acceptance Model. RESULTS: A total of 40 (80%) of the 50 participants approached completed the symptom checker assessment and usability survey. Their mean age was 39.3 (SD 15.9; range 18-76) years, and they were 65% (26/40) female, 68% (27/40) White, 48% (19/40) Hispanic or Latino, and 13% (5/40) Black or African American. Some cases had missing data or a lack of a clear ED diagnosis; 75% (30/40) were included in the analysis of diagnosis, and 93% (37/40) for triage. The sensitivity for at least one of the final ED diagnoses by Ada (based on its top 5 diagnoses) was 70% (95% CI 54%-86%), close to the mean sensitivity for the 3 physicians (on their top 3 diagnoses) of 68.9%. The physicians rated the Ada triage decisions as 62% (23/37) fully agree and 24% (9/37) safe but too cautious. It was rated as unsafe and too risky in 22% (8/37) of cases by at least one physician, in 14% (5/37) of cases by at least two physicians, and in 5% (2/37) of cases by all 3 physicians. Usability was rated highly; participants agreed or strongly agreed with the 7 Technology Acceptance Model usability questions with a mean score of 84.6%, although "satisfaction" and "enjoyment" were rated low. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides preliminary evidence that a symptom checker can provide acceptable usability and diagnostic accuracy for patients with various urgent conditions. A total of 14% (5/37) of symptom checker triage recommendations were deemed unsafe and too risky by at least two physicians based on the symptoms recorded, similar to the results of studies on telephone and nurse triage. Larger studies are needed of diagnosis and triage performance with direct patient use in different clinical environments.


Subject(s)
Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Emergency Service, Hospital , Physicians , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Triage/methods , Young Adult
20.
Philos Ethics Humanit Med ; 17(1): 12, 2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053928

ABSTRACT

With the current pandemic, many scholars have contended that clinical criteria offer the best way to implement triage. Further, they dismiss the criteria of social value as a good one for triage. In this paper, I respond to refute this perspective. In particular, I present two sets of arguments. Firstly, I argue that the objections to the social value criteria they present apply to the clinical criteria they favor. Secondly, they exaggerate the negative aspects of the social value criteria, while I suggest it is reasonable to use this. I end the article by recommending how operative public values can be a good way to make triaging decisions.


Subject(s)
Social Values , Triage , Delivery of Health Care , Health Facilities , Pandemics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL