Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.117
Filter
1.
3.
Int J Colorectal Dis ; 38(1): 150, 2023 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243202

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: With the onset of the COVID pandemic in Germany in March 2020, far-reaching restrictions were imposed that limited medical access for patients. Screening examinations such as colonoscopies were greatly reduced in number. As rapid surgical triage after diagnosis is prognostic, our hypothesis was that pandemic-related delays would increase the proportion of advanced colon cancers with an overall sicker patient population. METHODS: A total of 204 patients with initial diagnosis of colon cancer were analyzed in this retrospective single-center study between 03/01/2018 and 03/01/2022. Control group (111 patients, pre-COVID-19) and the study group (93 patients, during COVID-19) were compared in terms of tumor stages, surgical therapy, complications, and delays in the clinical setting. The data were presented either as absolute numbers or as median for constant data. RESULTS: A trend towards more advanced tumor stages (T4a p = 0.067) and a significant increase of emergency surgeries (p = 0.016) with higher rates of ileus and perforation (p = 0.004) as well as discontinuity resections (p = 0.049) during the pandemic could be observed. Delays in surgical triage after endoscopic diagnosis were seen during the 2nd lockdown (02/11/20-26/12/20; p = 0.031). CONCLUSION: In summary, the results suggest delayed treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic, with the infection pattern of COVID appearing to have a major impact on the time between endoscopic diagnosis and surgical triage/surgery. Adequate care of colon cancer patients is possible even during a pandemic, but it is important to focus on structured screening and tight diagnosis to treatment schedules in order to prevent secondary pandemic victims.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colonic Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/methods , Retrospective Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Colonic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colonic Neoplasms/surgery
4.
J Med Internet Res ; 25: e43803, 2023 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the context of a deepening global shortage of health workers and, in particular, the COVID-19 pandemic, there is growing international interest in, and use of, online symptom checkers (OSCs). However, the evidence surrounding the triage and diagnostic accuracy of these tools remains inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed to summarize the existing peer-reviewed literature evaluating the triage accuracy (directing users to appropriate services based on their presenting symptoms) and diagnostic accuracy of OSCs aimed at lay users for general health concerns. METHODS: Searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Health Management Information Consortium (HMIC), and Web of Science, as well as the citations of the studies selected for full-text screening. We included peer-reviewed studies published in English between January 1, 2010, and February 16, 2022, with a controlled and quantitative assessment of either or both triage and diagnostic accuracy of OSCs directed at lay users. We excluded tools supporting health care professionals, as well as disease- or specialty-specific OSCs. Screening and data extraction were carried out independently by 2 reviewers for each study. We performed a descriptive narrative synthesis. RESULTS: A total of 21,296 studies were identified, of which 14 (0.07%) were included. The included studies used clinical vignettes, medical records, or direct input by patients. Of the 14 studies, 6 (43%) reported on triage and diagnostic accuracy, 7 (50%) focused on triage accuracy, and 1 (7%) focused on diagnostic accuracy. These outcomes were assessed based on the diagnostic and triage recommendations attached to the vignette in the case of vignette studies or on those provided by nurses or general practitioners, including through face-to-face and telephone consultations. Both diagnostic accuracy and triage accuracy varied greatly among OSCs. Overall diagnostic accuracy was deemed to be low and was almost always lower than that of the comparator. Similarly, most of the studies (9/13, 69 %) showed suboptimal triage accuracy overall, with a few exceptions (4/13, 31%). The main variables affecting the levels of diagnostic and triage accuracy were the severity and urgency of the condition, the use of artificial intelligence algorithms, and demographic questions. However, the impact of each variable differed across tools and studies, making it difficult to draw any solid conclusions. All included studies had at least one area with unclear risk of bias according to the revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. CONCLUSIONS: Although OSCs have potential to provide accessible and accurate health advice and triage recommendations to users, more research is needed to validate their triage and diagnostic accuracy before widescale adoption in community and health care settings. Future studies should aim to use a common methodology and agreed standard for evaluation to facilitate objective benchmarking and validation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42020215210; https://tinyurl.com/3949zw83.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , Humans , Triage/methods , Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19/diagnosis , Pandemics , Algorithms , COVID-19 Testing
5.
Int. j. cardiovasc. sci. (Impr.) ; 35(1): 127-134, Jan.-Feb. 2022. graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2324827

ABSTRACT

Abstract Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in the world. People living in vulnerable and poor places such as slums, rural areas and remote locations have difficulty in accessing medical care and diagnostic tests. In addition, given the COVID-19 pandemic, we are witnessing an increase in the use of telemedicine and non-invasive tools for monitoring vital signs. These questions motivate us to write this point of view and to describe some of the main innovations used for non-invasive screening of heart diseases. Smartphones are widely used by the population and are perfect tools for screening cardiovascular diseases. They are equipped with camera, flashlight, microphone, processor, and internet connection, which allow optical, electrical, and acoustic analysis of cardiovascular phenomena. Thus, when using signal processing and artificial intelligence approaches, smartphones may have predictive power for cardiovascular diseases. Here we present different smartphone approaches to analyze signals obtained from various methods including photoplethysmography, phonocardiograph, and electrocardiography to estimate heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart murmurs and electrical conduction. Our objective is to present innovations in non-invasive diagnostics using the smartphone and to reflect on these trending approaches. These could help to improve health access and the screening of cardiovascular diseases for millions of people, particularly those living in needy areas.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence/trends , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Triage/trends , Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted/methods , Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted/trends , Smartphone/trends , Triage/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends , Mobile Applications/trends , Smartphone/instrumentation , Telecardiology , COVID-19/diagnosis
6.
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther ; 52(4): 312-315, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324245

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was previously unknown, and we are learning about it day by day, but pandemic-associated ethical dilemmas have been studied and discussed for years. Triage means not only ranking in terms of importance (prioritisation) but also allocation of limited medical resources. Survival, post epidemic-quality of life, and consumption of medical resources required to achieve the set goal are crucial for making triage decisions. The pandemic triage decisions should be based on a protocol, considering the need for medical measures and therapy benefits. The first step is to consider the exclusion criteria and the risk of death. The next step is sequential clinical assessment, repeatable at defined intervals. It seems that the preferable solution is to triage all the patients and give priority to those who would benefit more. A prerequisite for allocating insufficient medical resources is public trust in the criteria for allocation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Triage/trends , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Humans , Triage/statistics & numerical data
7.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1160769, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327138

ABSTRACT

The current epidemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a public health event worldwide. Through ethical analysis of a series of epidemic prevention phenomena and epidemic prevention measures taken by the Chinese (and other countries) government and medical institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic, this paper discusses a series of ethical difficulties in hospital emergency triage caused by the COVID-19, including the autonomy limitation of patients and waste of epidemic prevention resources due to over-triage, the safety problem of patients because of inaccurate feedback information from intelligent epidemic prevention technology, and conflicts between individual interests of patients and public interests due to the "strict" implementation of the pandemic prevention and control system. In addition, we also discuss the solution path and strategy of these ethical issues from the perspective of system design and implementation based on the Care Ethics theory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Triage , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health
8.
Emerg Med J ; 40(7): 509-517, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324743

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tools proposed to triage ED acuity in suspected COVID-19 were derived and validated in higher income settings during early waves of the pandemic. We estimated the accuracy of seven risk-stratification tools recommended to predict severe illness in the Western Cape, South Africa. METHODS: An observational cohort study using routinely collected data from EDs across the Western Cape, from 27 August 2020 to 11 March 2022, was conducted to assess the performance of the PRIEST (Pandemic Respiratory Infection Emergency System Triage) tool, NEWS2 (National Early Warning Score, version 2), TEWS (Triage Early Warning Score), the WHO algorithm, CRB-65, Quick COVID-19 Severity Index and PMEWS (Pandemic Medical Early Warning Score) in suspected COVID-19. The primary outcome was intubation or non-invasive ventilation, death or intensive care unit admission at 30 days. RESULTS: Of the 446 084 patients, 15 397 (3.45%, 95% CI 34% to 35.1%) experienced the primary outcome. Clinical decision-making for inpatient admission achieved a sensitivity of 0.77 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.78), specificity of 0.88 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.88) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of 0.99 (95% CI 0.99 to 0.99). NEWS2, PMEWS and PRIEST scores achieved good estimated discrimination (C-statistic 0.79 to 0.82) and identified patients at risk of adverse outcomes at recommended cut-offs with moderate sensitivity (>0.8) and specificity ranging from 0.41 to 0.64. Use of the tools at recommended thresholds would have more than doubled admissions, with only a 0.01% reduction in false negative triage. CONCLUSION: No risk score outperformed existing clinical decision-making in determining the need for inpatient admission based on prediction of the primary outcome in this setting. Use of the PRIEST score at a threshold of one point higher than the previously recommended best approximated existing clinical accuracy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Early Warning Score , Humans , Adult , Triage , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Retrospective Studies
9.
Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol ; 89(3): 347-352, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324358

ABSTRACT

The unprecedented onset of the COVID-19 crisis poses a significant challenge to all fields of medicine, including dermatology. Since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, a stark decline in new skin cancer diagnoses has been reported by countries worldwide. One of the greatest challenges during the pandemic has been the reduced access to face-to-face dermatologic evaluation and non-urgent procedures, such as biopsies or surgical excisions. Teledermatology is a well-integrated alternative when face-to-face dermatological assistance is not available. Teledermoscopy, an extension of teledermatology, comprises consulting dermoscopic images to improve the remote assessment of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions when direct visualisation of lesions is difficult. One of teledermoscopy's greatest strengths may be its utility as a triage and monitoring tool, which is critical in the early detection of skin cancer, as it can reduce the number of unnecessary referrals, wait times, and the cost of providing and receiving dermatological care. Mobile teledermoscopy may act as a communication tool between medical practitioners and patients. By using their smartphone (mobile phone) patients can monitor a suspicious skin lesion identified by their medical practitioner, or alternatively self-detect concerning lesions and forward valuable dermoscopic images for remote medical evaluation. Several mobile applications that allow users to photograph suspicious lesions with their smartphones and have them evaluated using artificial intelligence technology have recently emerged. With the growing popularity of mobile apps and consumer-involved healthcare, this will likely be a key component of skin cancer screening in the years to come. However, most of these applications apply artificial intelligence technology to assess clinical images rather than dermoscopic images, which may lead to lower diagnostic accuracy. Incorporating the direct-to-consumer mobile dermoscopy model in combination with mole-scanning artificial intelligence as a mobile app may be the future of skin cancer detection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Skin Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Triage/methods , Artificial Intelligence , Telemedicine/methods , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Skin Neoplasms/diagnosis , Dermoscopy/methods
10.
World J Emerg Surg ; 18(1): 32, 2023 04 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322695

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Timely access to the operating room for emergency general surgery (EGS) indications remains a challenge across the globe, largely driven by operating room availability and staffing constraints. The "timing in acute care surgery" (TACS) classification was previously published to introduce a new tool to triage the timely and appropriate access of EGS patients to the operating room. However, the clinical and operational effectiveness of the TACS classification has not been investigated in subsequent validation studies. This study aimed to improve the TACS classification and provide further consensus around the appropriate use of the new TACS classification through a standardized Delphi approach with international experts. METHODS: This is a validation study of the new TACS by a selected international panel of experts using the Delphi method. The TACS questionnaire was designed as a web-based survey. The consensus agreement level was established to be ≥ 75%. The collective consensus agreement was defined as the sum of the percentage of the highest Likert scale levels (4-5) out of all participants. Surgical emergency diseases and correlated clinical scenarios were defined for each of the proposed classes. Subsequent rounds were carried out until a definitive level of consensus was reached. Frequencies and percentages were calculated to determine the degree of agreement for each surgical disease. RESULTS: Four polling rounds were carried out. The new TACS classification provides 6 colour-code classes correlated to a precise timing to surgery, defined scenarios and surgical condition. The WHITE colour-code class was introduced to rapidly (within a week) reschedule cancelled or postponed surgical procedures. Haemodynamic stability is the main tool to stratify patients for immediate surgery or not in the presence of sepsis/septic shock. Fifty-one surgical diseases were included in the different colour-code classes of priority. CONCLUSION: The new TACS classification is a comprehensive, simple, clear and reproducible triage system which can be used to assess the severity of the patient and the surgical disease, to reduce the time to access to the operating room, and to manage the emergency surgical patients within a "safe" timeframe. By including well-defined surgical diseases in the different colour-code classes of priority, validated through a Delphi consensus, the new TACS improves communication among surgeons, between surgeons and anaesthesiologists and decreases conflicts and waste and waiting time in accessing the operating room for emergency surgical patients.


Subject(s)
Surgeons , Triage , Humans , Delphi Technique , Triage/methods , Consensus , Operating Rooms
11.
Clin Med Res ; 21(1): 14-25, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317722

ABSTRACT

Objective: We evaluated the triage and prognostic performance of seven proposed computed tomography (CT)-severity score (CTSS) systems in two different age groups.Design: Retrospective study.Setting: COVID-19 pandemic.Participants: Admitted COVID-19, PCR-positive patients were included, excluding patients with heart failure and significant pre-existing pulmonary disease.Methods: Patients were divided into two age groups: ≥65 years and ≤64 years. Clinical data indicating disease severity at presentation and at peak disease severity were recorded. Initial CT images were scored by two radiologists according to seven CTSSs (CTSS1-CTSS7). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for the performance of each CTSS in diagnosing severe/critical disease on admission (triage performance) and at peak disease severity (prognostic performance) was done for the whole cohort and each age group separately.Results: Included were 96 patients. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between the two radiologists scoring the CT scan images were good for all the CTSSs (ICC=0.764-0.837). In the whole cohort, all CTSSs showed an unsatisfactory area under the curve (AUC) in the ROC curve for triage, excluding CTSS2 (AUC=0.700), and all CTSSs showed acceptable AUCs for prognostic usage (0.759-0.781). In the older group (≥65 years; n=55), all CTSSs excluding CTSS6 showed excellent AUCs for triage (0.804-0.830), and CTSS6 was acceptable (AUC=0.796); all CTSSs showed excellent or outstanding AUCs for prognostication (0.859-0.919). In the younger group (≤64 years; n=41), all CTSSs showed unsatisfactory AUCs for triage (AUC=0.487-0.565) and prognostic usage (AUC=0.668-0.694), excluding CTSS6, showing marginally acceptable AUC for prognostic performance (0.700).Conclusion: Those CTSSs requiring more numerous segmentations, namely CTSS2, CTSS7, and CTSS5 showed the best ICCs; therefore, they are the best when comparison between two separate scores is needed. Irrespective of patients' age, CTSSs show minimal value in triage and acceptable prognostic value in COVID-19 patients. CTSS performance is highly variable in different age groups. It is excellent in those aged ≥65 years, but has little if any value in younger patients. Multicenter studies with larger sample size to evaluate results of this study should be conducted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , Triage/methods , Prognosis , Pandemics , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
12.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284557, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2295816

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young children are among the most frequent patients at medical call centers, even though they are rarely severely ill. Respiratory tract symptoms are among the most prevalent reasons for contact in pediatric calls. Triage of children without visual cues and through second-hand information is perceived as difficult, with risks of over- and under-triage. OBJECTIVE: To study the safety and feasibility of introducing video triage of young children with respiratory symptoms at the medical helpline 1813 (MH1813) in Copenhagen, Denmark, as well as impact on patient outcome. METHODS: Prospective quality improvement study including 617 patients enrolled to video or standard telephone triage (1:1) from February 2019-March 2020. Data originated from MH1813 patient records, survey responses, and hospital charts. Primary outcome was difference in patients staying at home eight hours after the call. Secondary outcomes weas hospital outcome, feasibility and acceptability. Adverse events (intensive care unit admittance, lasting injuries, death) were registered. Logistic regression was used to test the effect on outcomes. The COVID-19 pandemic shut the study down prematurely. RESULTS: In total, 54% of the included patients were video-triaged., and 63% of video triaged patients and 58% of telephone triaged patients were triaged to stay at home, (p = 0.19). Within eight and 24 hours, there was a tendency of fewer video-triaged patients being assessed at hospitals: 39% versus 46% (p = 0.07) and 41% versus 49% (p = 0.07), respectively. At 24 hours after the call, 2.8% of the patients were hospitalized for at least 12 hours. Video triage was highly feasible and acceptable (>90%) and no adverse events were registered. CONCLUSION: Video triage of young children with respiratory symptoms at a medical call center was safe and feasible. Only about 3% of all children needed hospitalization for at least 12 hours. Video triage may optimize hospital referrals and increase health care accessibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Triage , Humans , Child , Child, Preschool , Prospective Studies , Quality Improvement , Pandemics , Telephone , Hospitals, Pediatric
13.
Orthopadie (Heidelb) ; 52(7): 587-594, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305171

ABSTRACT

The first severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV­2) pandemic wave in Germany in spring 2020 challenged the largely unprepared healthcare system. A prevention concept was implemented to protect the vulnerable patient group at our orthopedic department. The patient triage during the pre-admission process included screening for symptoms and obtaining information on travel, occupation, contact and cluster (TOCC) [16].In March 2020, all sporting events were also cancelled or postponed [12]. Mitigation strategies for sport activities were necessary to restart training and competition. For the professional handball team of the Sport Club Magdeburg (SCM), a hygiene concept including strict mitigation measures combined with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test regime was implemented.We reviewed 15,739 patient contacts in a 12-month period at orthopedic department during the SARS-CoV­2 pandemic. This epidemiological, retrospective study presents the results of patient triage detecting cases with suspected SARS-CoV­2 infections when entering the clinic. We also considered 2328 inpatient PCR test results and the infection rates among the medical staff. At the same period, professional athletes underwent 1428 PCR tests as a part of the hygiene concept.During the triage process, 333 cases (2.12%) with suspected SARS-CoV­2 infections were detected at the orthopedic outpatient department. Three patients had a positive PCR test result after triage. Another four positive PCR tests were found among the inpatient group and one positive result among the medical staff. In the athletes' cohort, none of the 1428 PCR tests was positive.Patient triage as a part of the preadmission process is an effective tool to protect the maximum-care hospital from a SARS-CoV­2 mass outbreak. A hygiene concept with a defined PCR test regime protects a professional athlete team from SARS-CoV­2 infections during international competition and training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics/prevention & control , Triage , Hospitals , Hygiene , Inpatients
16.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 59(4)2023 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303179

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Triage systems help provide the right care at the right time for patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs). Triage systems are generally used to subdivide patients into three to five categories according to the system used, and their performance must be carefully monitored to ensure the best care for patients. Materials and Methods: We examined ED accesses in the context of 4-level (4LT) and 5-level triage systems (5LT), implemented from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2020. This study assessed the effects of a 5LT on wait times and under-triage (UT) and over-triage (OT). We also examined how 5LT and 4LT systems reflected actual patient acuity by correlating triage codes with severity codes at discharge. Other outcomes included the impact of crowding indices and 5LT system function during the COVID-19 pandemic in the study populations. Results: We evaluated 423,257 ED presentations. Visits to the ED by more fragile and seriously ill individuals increased, with a progressive increase in crowding. The length of stay (LOS), exit block, boarding, and processing times increased, reflecting a net raise in throughput and output factors, with a consequent lengthening of wait times. The decreased UT trend was observed after implementing the 5LT system. Conversely, a slight rise in OT was reported, although this did not affect the medium-high-intensity care area. Conclusions: Introducing a 5LT improved ED performance and patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Waiting Lists , Humans , Triage , Pandemics , Length of Stay , Emergency Service, Hospital
17.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284177, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302956

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the Medically Necessary Time Sensitive (MeNTS) scoring system in triaging gynaecologic oncologic surgery during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study including 209 patients who either had surgery (151) or surgery postponed (58) between the 26th March and 30th September 2020 in an academic hospital in South Africa. The MeNTS score was used to independently score each patient three times by two observers. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 46.6 ± 15 years and the cumulative mean MeNTS score was 51.0 ± 5.1. Over two-thirds of the cases had surgery. There was no significant difference between the first and second observers' cumulative scores, 51.0 vs 51.1 (p 0.77). The cumulative score among those who had surgery was significantly lower than that for those whose surgeries were postponed, 49.8 vs 54.1 (p <0.0001). The intra-observer and inter-observer reliability were 0.78 and 0.74 respectively. After adjusting for confounding variables, those with low cumulative MeNTS scores were about 5 times more likely to have surgery than those with high scores (Adj. OR = 4.67, 95% CI: 1.92-11.4, p <0.001. Patients with malignant diagnosis were also 5 times more likely to be operated than those with benign diagnosis (Adj. OR = 5.03, 95% CI: 1.73-14.6, p <0.001. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.85 suggesting an excellent discriminatory power between those who were operated and those who were postponed. CONCLUSION: The study provided some insight into the potential usefulness of MeNTS score in prioritizing patients for surgery in gynaecologic oncologic sub-specialty. The score performed well across a range of gynaecologic conditions and procedures with good intra-observer and inter-observer consistency and reliability. This is a prioritization tool that is dynamically adaptable to accommodate changes in resources availability and operating theatre capacity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Female , Humans , Adult , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers , Retrospective Studies , Triage/methods , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Pandemics , South Africa/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Reproducibility of Results
18.
Echocardiography ; 40(5): 388-396, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301636

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cardiac involvement seems to impact prognosis of COVID-19, especially in critically ill patients. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, evaluated by bedside triage echocardiography (echo), in patients admitted to emergency departments (ED) in the US with COVID-19. We also assessed the feasibility of using cloud imaging for sharing and interpreting echocardiograms. METHODS: Patients admitted to three reference EDs with confirmed COVID-19 underwent triage echo within 72 h of symptom onset with remote interpretation. Clinical and laboratory data, as well as COVID-19 symptoms, were collected. The association between echo variables, demographics and clinical data with all-cause hospital mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) admission was assessed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Three hundred ninety-nine patients were enrolled, 41% women, with a mean age of 62±16 years. Mean oxygen saturation on presentation was 92.3± 9.2%. Compared to in-hospital survivors, non-survivors were older, had lower oxygen saturation on presentation, were more likely to have a chronic condition and had lower LV ejection fraction (50.3±19.7% vs. 58.0±13.6%) (P < .05). In the cohort, 101 (25%) patients had moderate/severe LV dysfunction, 131 (33%) had moderate/severe RV dysfunction. Advanced age and lower oxygen saturation were independently associated with death and ICU admission. LV and RV function, or other echo variables, were not independent predictors of outcomes. CONCLUSION: In patients admitted with COVID-19 undergoing early echo triage, the independent predictors of death and ICU admission were age and oxygen saturation. The inclusion of echo variables did not improve prediction of unfavorable outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Male , Triage , Ventricular Function, Left , Echocardiography , Retrospective Studies
19.
Med Pr ; 74(2): 145-150, 2023 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2301612

ABSTRACT

Mass casualty incident (MCI) is one of the most difficult situation in emergency medicine. Due to the specific conditions, MCIs occurring at sea are usually far more demanding than those happening on land. In this paper the authors would like to describe the MCIs, which have happened during almost 10 years of functioning of the Polish Telemedical Maritime Assistance Service (TMAS). First incident concerned a group of migrants floating on a raft on the Gulf of Mexico. The cause of the second incident was acute organophosphate intoxication among the crew of the merchant ship. The third incident was triggered by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is important to emphasize, that triage system may help in proper management of MCIs. Cooperation of the medical services, such as TMAS, local emergency medical staff, Search and Rescue (SAR) service and military force seems to be crucial in MCI managements occuring at sea. In case of any doubts, change of a course and heading to the nearest port or immediate evacuation should be taken into consideration. The authors believe that analysis of these incidents may help TMAS personnel all over the world to handle MCIs in the future. Med Pr. 2023;74(2):145-50.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Mass Casualty Incidents , Telemedicine , Humans , Poland/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ships , Triage
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL