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2.
Am J Med ; 134(11): 1380-1388.e3, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whether the volume of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) hospitalizations is associated with outcomes has important implications for the organization of hospital care both during this pandemic and future novel and rapidly evolving high-volume conditions. METHODS: We identified COVID-19 hospitalizations at US hospitals in the American Heart Association COVID-19 Cardiovascular Disease Registry with ≥10 cases between January and August 2020. We evaluated the association of COVID-19 hospitalization volume and weekly case growth indexed to hospital bed capacity, with hospital risk-standardized in-hospital case-fatality rate (rsCFR). RESULTS: There were 85 hospitals with 15,329 COVID-19 hospitalizations, with a median hospital case volume was 118 (interquartile range, 57, 252) and median growth rate of 2 cases per 100 beds per week but varied widely (interquartile range: 0.9 to 4.5). There was no significant association between overall hospital COVID-19 case volume and rsCFR (rho, 0.18, P = .09). However, hospitals with more rapid COVID-19 case-growth had higher rsCFR (rho, 0.22, P = 0.047), increasing across case growth quartiles (P trend = .03). Although there were no differences in medical treatments or intensive care unit therapies (mechanical ventilation, vasopressors), the highest case growth quartile had 4-fold higher odds of above median rsCFR, compared with the lowest quartile (odds ratio, 4.00; 1.15 to 13.8, P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: An accelerated case growth trajectory is a marker of hospitals at risk of poor COVID-19 outcomes, identifying sites that may be targets for influx of additional resources or triage strategies. Early identification of such hospital signatures is essential as our health system prepares for future health challenges.


Subject(s)
Bed Occupancy/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Mortality , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Civil Defense , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Health Care Rationing/standards , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Registries , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/organization & administration , United States/epidemiology
3.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(8): 576-582, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379820

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to establish a triaging system for assessment of breast referrals from primary care to ensure safe and effective breast services without compromising breast cancer management. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 was officially declared a global pandemic on 11 March 2020, and with no effective treatment available, preventing spread has been paramount. Previously, all referrals from primary care were seen in the rapid-access breast clinic (RABC). Clinic appointments exposed patients and healthcare professionals to risk. METHOD: Initial triage during the lockdown was in line with national governing body guidance, rejected low risk referrals and streamed remaining patients through a telephone consultation to RABC or discharge. A modified triage pathway streamed all patients through virtual triage to RABC, telephone clinic or discharge with advice and guidance categories. Demographics, reasons for referral and outcomes data were collected and presented as median with range and frequency with percentages. RESULTS: Initial triage (23 March-23 April 2020) found fewer referrals with a higher percentage of breast cancer diagnoses. Modified triage (22 June-17 July 2020) resulted in a 35.1% (99/282) reduction in RABC attendance. Overall cancer detection rate remained similar at 4.2% of all referrals pre-COVID (18/429) and 4.3% (12/282) during modified triage. After six months follow-up of patients not seen in RABC during the modified triage pathway, 18 patients were re-referred to RABC and none were diagnosed with cancer. CONCLUSION: A modified triage pathway has the potential to improve triage efficiency and prevent unnecessary visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further refinement of pathway is feasible in collaboration with primary care.


Subject(s)
Breast Diseases/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Triage/organization & administration , Adult , Cohort Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
Natl Med J India ; 33(6): 349-357, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332193

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 infection has placed health systems under unprecedented strain and foresight for preparedness is the key factor to avert disaster. Every facility that provides obstetric service needs a certain level of preparedness to be able to handle at least Covid-suspect pregnant women awaiting test reports, who need to be managed as Covid-positive patients till reports are available. Thus, these facilities need to have triage areas and Covid-suspect labour rooms. Healthcare facilities can have designated areas for Covid-positive patients or have referral linkages with designated Covid-positive hospitals. Preparation includes structural reorganization with setting up a Covid-suspect and Covid-positive facility in adequate space, as well as extensive training of staff about infection control practices and rational use of personal protective equipment (PPE). A systematic approach involving five essential steps of making standard operating procedures, infrastructural reorganization for a triage area and a Covid-suspect labour ward, procurement of PPE, managing the personnel and instituting appropriate infection control practices can ensure uninterrupted services to patients without compromising the safety of healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing/standards , Disinfection/organization & administration , Disinfection/standards , Female , Health Personnel/education , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital/standards , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Postnatal Care/organization & administration , Postnatal Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Triage/standards
5.
J Emerg Nurs ; 47(5): 721-732, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321390

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Emergency departments face unforeseen surges in patients classified as low acuity during pandemics such as the coronavirus disease pandemic. Streamlining patient flow using telemedicine in an alternative care area can reduce crowding and promote physical distancing between patients and clinicians, thus limiting personal protective equipment use. This quality improvement project describes critical elements and processes in the operationalization of a telemedicine-enabled drive-through and walk-in garage care system to improve ED throughput and conserve personal protective equipment during 3 coronavirus disease surges in 2020. METHODS: Standardized workflows were established for the operationalization of the telemedicine-enabled drive-through and walk-in garage care system for patients presenting with respiratory illness as quality improvement during disaster. Statistical control charts present interrupted time series data on the ED length of stay and personal protective equipment use in the week before and after deployment in March, July, and November 2020. RESULTS: Physical space, technology infrastructure, equipment, and staff workflows were critical to the operationalization of the telemedicine-enabled drive-through and walk-in garage care system. On average, the ED length of stay decreased 17%, from 4.24 hours during the week before opening to 3.54 hours during the telemedicine-enabled drive-through and walk-in garage care system operation. There was an estimated 25% to 41% reduction in personal protective equipment use during this time. CONCLUSION: Lessons learned from this telemedicine-enabled alternative care area implementation can be used for disaster preparedness and management in the ED setting to reduce crowding, improve throughput, and conserve personal protective equipment during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disaster Planning , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment
6.
Emerg Med J ; 38(9): 692-693, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent research suggests that between 20% and 50% of paediatric head injuries attending our emergency department (ED) could be safely discharged soon after triage, without the need for medical review, using a 'Head Injury Discharge At Triage' tool (HIDAT). We sought to implement this into clinical practice. METHODS: Paediatric ED triage staff underwent competency-based assessments for HIDAT with all head injury presentations 1 May to 31 October 2020 included in analysis. We determined which patients were discharged using the tool, which underwent CT of the brain and whether there was a clinically important traumatic brain injury or representation to the ED. RESULTS: Of the 1429 patients screened; 610 (43%) screened negative with 250 (18%) discharged by nursing staff. Of the entire cohort, 32 CTs were performed for head injury concerns (6 abnormal) with 1 CT performed in the HIDAT negative group (normal). Of those discharged using HIDAT, four reattended, two with vomiting (no imaging or admission) and two with minor scalp wound infections. Two patients who screened negative declined discharge under the policy with later medical discharge (no imaging or admission). Paediatric ED attendances were 29% lower than in 2018. CONCLUSION: We have successfully implemented HIDAT into local clinical practice. The number discharged (18%) is lower than originally described; this is likely multifactorial. The relationship between COVID-19 and paediatric ED attendances is unclear but decreased attendances suggest those for whom the tool was originally designed are not attending ED and may be accessing other medical/non-medical resources.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Head Injuries, Closed/diagnosis , Head Injuries, Penetrating/diagnosis , Triage/methods , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/etiology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Head Injuries, Closed/complications , Head Injuries, Penetrating/complications , Health Plan Implementation , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses, Pediatric/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Discharge , Professional Role , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards
7.
BJS Open ; 5(4)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297380

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has brought an unprecedented challenge to healthcare services. The authors' COVID-adapted pathway for suspected bowel cancer combines two quantitative faecal immunochemical tests (qFITs) with a standard CT scan with oral preparation (CT mini-prep). The aim of this study was to estimate the degree of risk mitigation and residual risk of undiagnosed colorectal cancer. METHOD: Decision-tree models were developed using a combination of data from the COVID-adapted pathway (April-May 2020), a local audit of qFIT for symptomatic patients performed since 2018, relevant data (prevalence of colorectal cancer and sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tools) obtained from literature and a local cancer data set, and expert opinion for any missing data. The considered diagnostic scenarios included: single qFIT; two qFITs; single qFIT and CT mini-prep; two qFITs and CT mini-prep (enriched pathway). These were compared to the standard diagnostic pathway (colonoscopy or CT virtual colonoscopy (CTVC)). RESULTS: The COVID-adapted pathway included 422 patients, whereas the audit of qFIT included more than 5000 patients. The risk of missing a colorectal cancer, if present, was estimated as high as 20.2 per cent with use of a single qFIT as a triage test. Using both a second qFIT and a CT mini-prep as add-on tests reduced the risk of missed cancer to 6.49 per cent. The trade-off was an increased rate of colonoscopy or CTVC, from 287 for a single qFIT to 418 for the double qFIT and CT mini-prep combination, per 1000 patients. CONCLUSION: Triage using qFIT alone could lead to a high rate of missed cancers. This may be reduced using CT mini-prep as an add-on test for triage to colonoscopy or CTVC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Diagnostic Errors/statistics & numerical data , Occult Blood , Triage/organization & administration , Clinical Audit , Colonoscopy , Decision Trees , Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Humans , Scotland , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
8.
BMC Fam Pract ; 22(1): 146, 2021 07 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295439

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, general practices were asked to expand triage and to reduce unnecessary face-to-face contact by prioritizing other consultation modes, e.g., online messaging, video, or telephone. The current study explores the potential barriers and facilitators general practitioners experienced to expanding triage systems and their attitudes towards triage during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A mixed-method study design was used in which a quantitative online survey was conducted along with qualitative interviews to gain a more nuanced appreciation for practitioners' experiences in the United Kingdom. The survey items were informed by the Theoretical Domains Framework so they would capture 14 behavioral factors that may influence whether practitioners use triage systems. Items were responded to using seven-point Likert scales. A median score was calculated for each item. The responses of participants identifying as part-owners and non-owners (i.e., "partner" vs. "non-partner" practitioners) were compared. The semi-structured interviews were conducted remotely and examined using Braun and Clark's thematic analysis. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 204 participants (66% Female). Most participants (83%) reported triaging patients. The items with the highest median scores captured the 'Knowledge,' 'Skills,' 'Social/Professional role and identity,' and 'Beliefs about capabilities' domains. The items with the lowest median scores captured the 'Beliefs about consequences,' 'Goals,' and 'Emotions' domains. For 14 of the 17 items, partner scores were higher than non-partner scores. All the qualitative interview participants relied on a phone triage system. Six broad themes were discovered: patient accessibility, confusions around what triage is, uncertainty and risk, relationships between service providers, job satisfaction, and the potential for total digital triage. Suggestions arose to optimize triage, such as ensuring there is sufficient time to conduct triage accurately and providing practical training to use triage efficiently. CONCLUSIONS: Many general practitioners are engaging with expanded triage systems, though more support is needed to achieve total triage across practices. Non-partner practitioners likely require more support to use the triage systems that practices take up. Additionally, practical support should be made available to help all practitioners manage the new risks and uncertainties they are likely to experience during non-face-to-face consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Practice , General Practitioners , Remote Consultation , Triage , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence , England/epidemiology , Female , General Practice/organization & administration , General Practice/standards , General Practice/trends , General Practitioners/psychology , General Practitioners/standards , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Male , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/ethics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Remote Consultation/ethics , Remote Consultation/methods , Risk Management/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/ethics , Triage/methods , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards
9.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 17(2): 547-550, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268381

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Health emergency due to COVID-19 started in Uruguay on March 13, 2020; our mastology unit tried to ensure adequate oncological care, and protect patients from the virus infection and complications. Objective: To assess the health care activities in the "peak" of the pandemic during 3 months. Materials and Methods: we collected data from the electronic health record. Results: There were a total of 293 medical appointments from 131 patients (221 face-to-face), that decreased by 16.7% compared to the same period in 2019 (352 appointments). The medical appointments were scheduled to evaluate the continuity of systemic treatment or modifications (95 patients; 72.5%), follow-up (17; 12.9%), first-time consultation (12; 9.1%), and assess paraclinical studies (7; 5.3%). The patients were on hormone therapy (81 patients; 74%), chemotherapy (CT) (21; 19%), and anti-HER2 therapies (9; 8%). New twenty treatments were initiated. Of the 14 patients that were on adjuvant/neoadjuvant CT, 9 (64.3%) continued with the same regimen with the addition of prophylactic granulocyte-colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF), and 5 (35.7%), who were receiving weekly paclitaxel, continued the treatment with no changes. Of the seven patients that were on palliative CT, 2 (28.5%) continued the treatment with the addition of G-CSF, 3 (42.8%) continued with weekly capecitabine or paclitaxel with no treatment changes, and 2 (28.5%) changed their treatment regimen (a less myelosuppressive regimen was selected for one and due to progression of the disease in the other patient). The ninety patients who were receiving adjuvant, neoadjuvant, or palliative criteria hormone therapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, continued the treatment with no changes. Conclusions: The evidence suggests that, although medical appointments decreased by approximately 17%, we could maintain healthcare activities, continued most of the treatments while the most modified was CT with G-CSF to avoid myelosuppression.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bone Marrow/drug effects , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor/administration & dosage , Hematopoiesis/drug effects , Hematopoiesis/immunology , Humans , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Medical Oncology/standards , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Referral and Consultation/standards , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Uruguay/epidemiology
10.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 148(1): 168e-169e, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263729

Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing/standards , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Testing/trends , Egypt/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Health Policy , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgery Department, Hospital/standards , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surgery, Plastic/standards , Surgery, Plastic/statistics & numerical data , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards , Triage/statistics & numerical data , Triage/trends
11.
Enferm Clin (Engl Ed) ; 31: S12-S17, 2021 Feb.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172424

ABSTRACT

At the international level, the enormous demand to manage the COVID-19 pandemic has posed a challenge both in the provision of personnel and in supplies and sanitary material. There is no precedent or publication related to the management and leadership of nursing services in Spain within the emergency plan for the COVID-19 pandemic. This article describes the experience of the Hospital Clinico de Barcelona in the current extraordinary circumstances that undoubtedly constitute a nursing management of enormous magnitude and unprecedented due to the high number of people affected and the extraordinary risk of healthcare personnel. Following national and international guidelines to alleviate the pandemic, protect health and prevent the spread of the outbreak. The ability to work as a team, emotional management and respect for organizational decisions have made it possible to face the challenges that the pandemic has put in place and that the Nursing Department can lead in a calm and orderly manner the different actions to perform. Lastly, it will be necessary to continue with an in-depth analysis of the situation and of the actions carried out in order to identify the areas for improvement as well as to evaluate the overall nature of the process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Administration , Leadership , Nursing Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Advisory Committees/organization & administration , Bed Conversion , COVID-19/therapy , Checklist , Clinical Protocols , Emergencies/epidemiology , Health Personnel/education , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Humans , Nurse's Role , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Spain/epidemiology , Triage/organization & administration
12.
J Med Syst ; 45(5): 59, 2021 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172395

ABSTRACT

Health systems are struggling to manage a fluctuating volume of critically ill patients with COVID-19 while continuing to provide basic surgical services and expand capacity to address operative cases delayed by the pandemic. As we move forward through the next phases of the pandemic, we will need a decision-making system that allows us to remain nimble as clinicians to meet our patient's needs while also working with a new framework of healthcare operations. Here, we present our quality improvement process for the adaptation and application of the Medically Necessary Time-Sensitive (MeNTS) toolto gynecologic surgical services beyond the initial COVID response and into recovery of surgical services; with analysis of the reliability of the modified-MeNTS tool in our multi-site safety net hospital network. This multicenter study evaluated the gynecology surgical case volume at three tertiary acute care safety net institutions within the LA County Department of Health Services: Harbor-UCLA (HUMC), Olive View Medical Center (OVMC), and Los Angeles County + University of Southern California (LAC+USC). We describe our modified-Delphi approach to adapt the MeNTS tool in a structured fashion and its application to gynecologic surgical services. Blinded reviewers engaged in a three-round iterative adaptation and final scoring utilizing the modified tool. The cohort consisted of 392 female consecutive gynecology patients across three Los Angeles County Hospitals awaiting scheduled procedures in the surgical queue.The majority of patients were Latina (74.7%) and premenopausal (67.1%). Over half (52.4%) of the patients had cardiovascular disease, while 13.0% had lung disease, and 13.8% had diabetes. The most common indications for surgery were abnormal uterine bleeding (33.2%), pelvic organ prolapse (19.6%) and presence of an adnexal mass (14.3%). Minimally invasive approaches via laparoscopy, robotic-assisted laparoscopy, or vaginal surgery was the predominant planned surgical route (54.8%). Modified-MeNTS scores assumed a normal distribution across all patients within our cohort (Median 33, Range 18-52). Overall, ICC across all three institutions demonstrated "good" interrater reliability (0.72). ICC within institutions at HUMC and OVMC were categorized as "good" interrater reliability, while LAC-USC interrater reliability was categorized as "excellent" (HUMC 0.73, OVMC 0.65, LAC+USC 0.77). The modified-MeNTS tool performed well across a range of patients and procedures with a normal distribution of scores and high reliability between raters. We propose that the modified-MeNTS framework be considered as it employs quantitative methods for decision-making rather than subjective assessments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , Triage/organization & administration , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Mass Index , Comorbidity , Delphi Technique , Female , Humans , Los Angeles/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Young Adult
15.
Emerg Med J ; 38(5): 373-378, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153688

ABSTRACT

Anticipating the need for a COVID-19 treatment centre in Israel, a designated facility was established at Sheba Medical Center-a quaternary referral centre. The goals were diagnosis and treatment of patients with COVID-19 while protecting patients and staff from infection and ensuring operational continuity and treatment of patients with non-COVID. Options considered included adaptation of existing wards, building a tented facility and converting a non-medical structure. The option chosen was a non-medical structure converted to a hospitalisation facility suited for COVID-19 with appropriate logistic and organisational adaptations. Operational principles included patient isolation, unidirectional workflow from clean to contaminated zones and minimising direct contact between patients and caregivers using personal protection equipment (PPE) and a multimodal telemedicine system. The ED was modified to enable triage and treatment of patients with COVID-19 while maintaining a COVID-19-free environment in the main campus. This system enabled treatment of patients with COVID-19 while maintaining staff safety and conserving the operational continuity and the ability to continue delivery of treatment to patients with non-COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Hospitals, Special/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Israel/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Triage/organization & administration , Workflow
17.
BMJ Health Care Inform ; 28(1)2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123602

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Identifying those individuals requiring medical care is a basic tenet of the pandemic response. Here, we examine the COVID-19 community triage pathways employed by four nations, specifically comparing the safety and efficacy of national online 'symptom checkers' used within the triage pathway. METHODS: A simulation study was conducted on current, nationwide, patient-led symptom checkers from four countries (Singapore, Japan, USA and UK). 52 cases were simulated to approximate typical COVID-19 presentations (mild, moderate, severe and critical) and COVID-19 mimickers (eg, sepsis and bacterial pneumonia). The same simulations were applied to each of the four country's symptom checkers, and the recommendations to refer on for medical care or to stay home were recorded and compared. RESULTS: The symptom checkers from Singapore and Japan advised onward healthcare contact for the majority of simulations (88% and 77%, respectively). The USA and UK symptom checkers triaged 38% and 44% of cases to healthcare contact, respectively. Both the US and UK symptom checkers consistently failed to identify severe COVID-19, bacterial pneumonia and sepsis, triaging such cases to stay home. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that whilst 'symptom checkers' may be of use to the healthcare COVID-19 response, there is the potential for such patient-led assessment tools to worsen outcomes by delaying appropriate clinical assessment. The key features of the well-performing symptom checkers are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Public Health Informatics/organization & administration , Symptom Assessment/methods , Triage/organization & administration , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Japan , Singapore
19.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 47, 2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19) has rapidly become a pandemic emergency, distressing health systems in each affected country. Preparation strategies for managing this pandemic have been keys to face the COVID-19 surge all over the world and all levels of care. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During the epidemic, the Italian society of pediatric emergency-urgency (SIMEUP) promoted a national survey aiming to evaluate preparedness and response of pediatric emergency departments (PED) critical in ensuring optimal management of COVID-19 cases. RESULTS: Our results suggest that Italian PED have promptly set a proactive approach to the present emergency. 98.9% of the hospitals have defined special pathways and assistive protocols concerning the management of pediatric COVID-19 cases. The highest percentage of application of the measures for preventive and protective for COVID-19 concerned the use of personal protective equipments. CONCLUSIONS: Results show that the following measures for pediatric patients, admitted in PED, have been promptly implemented throughout the whole country: eg. use of protective devices, pre-triage of patients accessing the hospital. Despite COVID-19 being a new threat, we have shown that by developing an easy-to-follow decision algorithm and clear plans for the interventional platform teams, we can ensure optimal health care workers and patients' safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pediatric Emergency Medicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Clinical Protocols , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Personal Protective Equipment , Surveys and Questionnaires , Triage/organization & administration
20.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(3): 241-245, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1111943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Utilisation of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 has been recommended during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic for the assessment of head and neck cancer referrals. As limited data were available, this study was conducted to analyse the use of the Head and Neck Cancer Risk Calculator version 2 in clinical practice. METHOD: Patients undergoing telephone triage in a two-week wait referral clinic were included. Data were collected and analysed using appropriate methods. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients in the study were risk-stratified into low-risk (51.6 per cent, 33 of 64), moderate-risk (14.1 per cent, 9 of 64) and high-risk (34.4 per cent, 22 of 64) groups. Of the patients, 53.1 per cent (34 of 64) avoided an urgent hospital visit, and 96.9 per cent (62 of 64) were cancer free, while 3.1 per cent (2 of 64) were found to have a head and neck malignancy. The sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy were 50.00 per cent, 66.13 per cent, 99.92 per cent and 66.11 per cent, respectively. CONCLUSION: It is reasonable to use the calculator for triaging purposes, but it must always be accompanied by a meticulous clinical thought process.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Triage/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Risk Assessment , Sensitivity and Specificity , Telephone , Time Factors , United Kingdom
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