Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 28
Filter
2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 833715, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731782

ABSTRACT

2020 will be marked in history for the dreadful implications of the COVID-19 pandemic that shook the world globally. The pandemic has reshaped the normality of life and affected mankind in the aspects of mental and physical health, financial, economy, growth, and development. The focus shift to COVID-19 has indirectly impacted an existing air-borne disease, Tuberculosis. In addition to the decrease in TB diagnosis, the emergence of the TB/COVID-19 syndemic and its serious implications (possible reactivation of latent TB post-COVID-19, aggravation of an existing active TB condition, or escalation of the severity of a COVID-19 during TB-COVID-19 coinfection), serve as primary reasons to equally prioritize TB. On a different note, the valuable lessons learnt for the COVID-19 pandemic provide useful knowledge for enhancing TB diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, the crucial need to focus on TB amid the COVID-19 pandemic has been discussed. Besides, a general comparison between COVID-19 and TB in the aspects of pathogenesis, diagnostics, symptoms, and treatment options with importance given to antibody therapy were presented. Lastly, the lessons learnt from the COVID-19 pandemic and how it is applicable to enhance the antibody-based immunotherapy for TB have been presented.


Subject(s)
Antibodies/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Coinfection/therapy , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/therapy , Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/diagnosis , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/immunology , Humans , Immunotherapy , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Tuberculosis/immunology
3.
JCI Insight ; 7(3)2022 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705325

ABSTRACT

BackgroundAdenovirus-vectored (Ad-vectored) vaccines are typically administered via i.m. injection to humans and are incapable of inducing respiratory mucosal immunity. However, aerosol delivery of Ad-vectored vaccines remains poorly characterized, and its ability to induce mucosal immunity in humans is unknown. This phase Ib trial evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of human serotype-5 Ad-vectored tuberculosis (TB) vaccine (AdHu5Ag85A) delivered to humans via inhaled aerosol or i.m. injection.MethodsThirty-one healthy, previously BCG-vaccinated adults were enrolled. AdHu5Ag85A was administered by single-dose aerosol using Aeroneb Solo Nebulizer or by i.m. injection. The study consisted of the low-dose (LD) aerosol, high-dose (HD) aerosol, and i.m. groups. The adverse events were assessed at various times after vaccination. Immunogenicity data were collected from the peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage samples at baseline, as well as at select time points after vaccination.ResultsThe nebulized aerosol droplets were < 5.39 µm in size. Both LD and HD of AdHu5Ag85A administered by aerosol inhalation and i.m. injection were safe and well tolerated. Both aerosol doses, particularly LD, but not i.m., vaccination markedly induced airway tissue-resident memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of polyfunctionality. While as expected, i.m. vaccination induced Ag85A-specific T cell responses in the blood, the LD aerosol vaccination also elicited such T cells in the blood. Furthermore, the LD aerosol vaccination induced persisting transcriptional changes in alveolar macrophages.ConclusionInhaled aerosol delivery of Ad-vectored vaccine is a safe and superior way to elicit respiratory mucosal immunity. This study warrants further development of aerosol vaccine strategies against respiratory pathogens, including TB and COVID-19.Trial registrationClinicalTrial.gov, NCT02337270.FundingThe Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada funded this work.


Subject(s)
Aerosols/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tuberculosis Vaccines/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Administration, Inhalation , Adolescent , Adult , Aerosols/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Mucosal/drug effects , Immunity, Mucosal/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tuberculosis/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Young Adult
5.
Int J Infect Dis ; 113 Suppl 1: S82-S87, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575296

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The interaction of COVID-19 and tuberculosis (TB) are still poor characterized. Here we evaluated the immune response specific for Micobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and SARS-CoV-2 using a whole-blood-based assay-platform in COVID-19 patients either with TB or latent TB infection (LTBI). METHODS: We evaluated IFN-γ level in plasma from whole-blood stimulated with Mtb antigens in the Quantiferon-Plus format or with peptides derived from SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, Wuhan-Hu-1 isolate (CD4-S). RESULTS: We consecutively enrolled 63 COVID-19, 10 TB-COVID-19 and 11 LTBI-COVID-19 patients. IFN-γ response to Mtb-antigens was significantly associated to TB status and therefore it was higher in TB-COVID-19 and LTBI-COVID-19 patients compared to COVID-19 patients (p ≤ 0.0007). Positive responses against CD4-S were found in 35/63 COVID-19 patients, 7/11 LTBI-COVID-19 and only 2/10 TB-COVID-19 patients. Interestingly, the responders in the TB-COVID-19 group were less compared to COVID-19 and LTBI-COVID-19 groups (p = 0.037 and 0.044, respectively). Moreover, TB-COVID-19 patients showed the lowest quantitative IFN-γ response to CD4-S compared to COVID-19-patients (p = 0.0336) and LTBI-COVID-19 patients (p = 0.0178). CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that COVID-19 patients either TB or LTBI have a low ability to build an immune response to SARS-CoV-2 while retaining the ability to respond to Mtb-specific antigens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Tuberculosis , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Interferon-gamma/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Tuberculosis/immunology
6.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(11): 1590-1597, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561435

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Trials of BCG vaccination to prevent or reduce severity of COVID-19 are taking place in adults, some of whom have been previously vaccinated, but evidence of the beneficial, non-specific effects of BCG come largely from data on mortality in infants and young children, and from in-vitro and animal studies, after a first BCG vaccination. We assess all-cause mortality following a large BCG revaccination trial in Malawi. METHODS: The Karonga Prevention trial was a population-based, double-blind, randomised controlled in Karonga District, northern Malawi, that enrolled participants between January, 1986, and November, 1989. The trial compared BCG (Glaxo-strain) revaccination versus placebo to prevent tuberculosis and leprosy. 46 889 individuals aged 3 months to 75 years were randomly assigned to receive BCG revaccination (n=23 528) or placebo (n=23 361). Here we report mortality since vaccination as recorded during active follow-up in northern areas of the district in 1991-94, and in a demographic surveillance follow-up in the southern area in 2002-18. 7389 individuals who received BCG (n=3746) or placebo (n=3643) lived in the northern follow-up areas, and 5616 individuals who received BCG (n=2798) or placebo (n=2818) lived in the southern area. Year of death or leaving the area were recorded for those not found. We used survival analysis to estimate all-cause mortality. FINDINGS: Follow-up information was available for 3709 (99·0%) BCG recipients and 3612 (99·1%) placebo recipients in the northern areas, and 2449 (87·5%) BCG recipients and 2413 (85·6%) placebo recipients in the southern area. There was no difference in mortality between the BCG and placebo groups in either area, overall or by age group or sex. In the northern area, there were 129 deaths per 19 694 person-years at risk in the BCG group (6·6 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·5-7·8]) versus 133 deaths per 19 111 person-years at risk in the placebo group (7·0 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·9-8·2]; HR 0·94 [95% CI 0·74-1·20]; p=0·62). In the southern area, there were 241 deaths per 38 399 person-years at risk in the BCG group (6·3 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·5-7·1]) versus 230 deaths per 38 676 person-years at risk in the placebo group (5·9 deaths per 1000 person-years at risk [95% CI 5·2-6·8]; HR 1·06 [95% CI 0·88-1·27]; p=0·54). INTERPRETATION: We found little evidence of any beneficial effect of BCG revaccination on all-cause mortality. The high proportion of deaths attributable to non-infectious causes beyond infancy, and the long time interval since BCG for most deaths, might obscure any benefits. FUNDING: British Leprosy Relief Association (LEPRA); Wellcome Trust.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage , Immunization, Secondary/statistics & numerical data , Mortality , Vaccination/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , Double-Blind Method , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Leprosy/immunology , Leprosy/mortality , Leprosy/prevention & control , Malawi/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium leprae/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Treatment Outcome , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/mortality , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
7.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 578-588, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490460

ABSTRACT

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is the pathogen which causes tuberculosis (TB), a significant human public health threat. Co-infection of M. tuberculosis and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), emergence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis, and failure to develop highly effective TB vaccines have limited control of the TB epidemic. Trained immunity is an enhanced innate immune response which functions independently of the adaptive/acquired immune system and responds non-specifically to reinfection with invading agents. Recently, several studies have found trained immunity has the capability to control and eliminate M. tuberculosis infection. Over the past decades, however, the consensus was adaptive immunity is the only protective mechanism by which hosts inhibit M. tuberculosis growth. Furthermore, autophagy plays an essential role in the development of trained immunity. Further investigation of trained immunity, M. tuberculosis infection, and the role of autophagy in this process provide new possibilities for vaccine development. In this review, we present the general characteristics of trained immunity and autophagy. We additionally summarize several examples where initiation of trained immunity contributes to the prevention of M. tuberculosis infection and propose future directions for research in this area.


Subject(s)
Autophagy , Immunity, Innate , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis Vaccines/immunology , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Vaccination
8.
J Clin Invest ; 131(11)2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448082

ABSTRACT

First administered to a human subject as a tuberculosis (TB) vaccine on July 18, 1921, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has a long history of use for the prevention of TB and later the immunotherapy of bladder cancer. For TB prevention, BCG is given to infants born globally across over 180 countries and has been in use since the late 1920s. With about 352 million BCG doses procured annually and tens of billions of doses having been administered over the past century, it is estimated to be the most widely used vaccine in human history. While its roles for TB prevention and bladder cancer immunotherapy are widely appreciated, over the past century, BCG has been also studied for nontraditional purposes, which include (a) prevention of viral infections and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, (b) cancer immunotherapy aside from bladder cancer, and (c) immunologic diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and atopic diseases. The basis for these heterologous effects lies in the ability of BCG to alter immunologic set points via heterologous T cell immunity, as well as epigenetic and metabolomic changes in innate immune cells, a process called "trained immunity." In this Review, we provide an overview of what is known regarding the trained immunity mechanism of heterologous protection, and we describe the current knowledge base for these nontraditional uses of BCG.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Immunity, Cellular , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Mycobacterium bovis/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/therapy , Virus Diseases/therapy , Animals , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/history , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/pathology , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/history , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/pathology , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/history , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/immunology , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/pathology , Mycobacterium Infections, Nontuberculous/prevention & control , Tuberculosis/history , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/history , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/immunology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/pathology , Virus Diseases/history , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/pathology
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(4)2021 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387607

ABSTRACT

The global incidence of tuberculosis remains unacceptably high, with new preventative strategies needed to reduce the burden of disease. We describe here a method for the generation of synthetic self-adjuvanted protein vaccines and demonstrate application in vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Two vaccine constructs were designed, consisting of full-length ESAT6 protein fused to the TLR2-targeting adjuvants Pam2Cys-SK4 or Pam3Cys-SK4 These were produced by chemical synthesis using a peptide ligation strategy. The synthetic self-adjuvanting vaccines generated powerful local CD4+ T cell responses against ESAT6 and provided significant protection in the lungs from virulent M. tuberculosis aerosol challenge when administered to the pulmonary mucosa of mice. The flexible synthetic platform we describe, which allows incorporation of adjuvants to multiantigenic vaccines, represents a general approach that can be applied to rapidly assess vaccination strategies in preclinical models for a range of diseases, including against novel pandemic pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis Vaccines/pharmacology , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Vaccines, Conjugate/pharmacology , Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , Animals , Antigens, Bacterial/immunology , BCG Vaccine/immunology , BCG Vaccine/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Toll-Like Receptor 2/immunology , Tuberculosis Vaccines/immunology , Vaccines, Conjugate/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/pharmacology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253169, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278188

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has created a remarkable and varying impact in every country, inciting calls for broad attention. Recently, the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination has been regarded as a potential candidate to explain this difference. Herein, we hypothesised that the past epidemic of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) may act as a latent explanatory factor for the worldwide differences seen in COVID-19 impact on mortality and incidence. We compared two indicators of past epidemic of M. tuberculosis, specifically, incidence (90 countries in 1990) and mortality (28 countries in 1950), with the mortality and incidence of COVID-19. We determined that an inverse relationship existed between the past epidemic indicators of M. tuberculosis and current COVID-19 impact. The rate ratio of the cumulative COVID-19 mortality per 1 million was 2.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09-6.68) per 1 unit decrease in the incidence rate of tuberculosis (per 100,000 people). The rate ratio of the cumulative COVID-19 incidence per 1 million was 2.07 (95% CI: 1.30-3.30). This association existed even after adjusting for potential confounders (rate of people aged 65 over, diabetes prevalence, the mortality rate from cardiovascular disease, and gross domestic product per capita), leading to an adjusted rate ratio of COVID-19 mortality of 2.44, (95% CI: 1.32-4.52) and a COVID-19 incidence of 1.31 (95% CI: 0.97-1.78). After latent infection, Mycobacterium survives in the human body and may continue to stimulate trained immunity. This study suggests a possible mechanism underlying the region-based variation in the COVID-19 impact.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tuberculosis/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Epidemics , Humans , Incidence , Models, Theoretical , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/physiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Rate , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/microbiology , Vaccination
12.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1217-1218, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276098

ABSTRACT

A simple mRNA vaccine was shown to protect mice against tuberculosis more than 15 years ago. Like COVID-19, tuberculosis is a respiratory infection killing over a million people per year. It too presents a global emergency. Can the stunning success of RNA vaccination against COVID-19 be replicated for TB?


Subject(s)
Tuberculosis Vaccines/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Humans , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/microbiology
13.
J Clin Invest ; 131(12)2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269823

ABSTRACT

T cells are involved in control of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but limited knowledge is available on the relationship between antigen-specific T cell response and disease severity. Here, we used flow cytometry to assess the magnitude, function, and phenotype of SARS coronavirus 2-specific (SARS-CoV-2-specific) CD4+ T cells in 95 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 38 of them being HIV-1 and/or tuberculosis (TB) coinfected, and 38 non-COVID-19 patients. We showed that SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T cell attributes, rather than magnitude, were associated with disease severity, with severe disease being characterized by poor polyfunctional potential, reduced proliferation capacity, and enhanced HLA-DR expression. Moreover, HIV-1 and TB coinfection skewed the SARS-CoV-2 T cell response. HIV-1-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion associated with suboptimal T cell and humoral immune responses to SARS-CoV-2, and a decrease in the polyfunctional capacity of SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T cells was observed in COVID-19 patients with active TB. Our results also revealed that COVID-19 patients displayed reduced frequency of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cells, with possible implications for TB disease progression. These results corroborate the important role of SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells in COVID-19 pathogenesis and support the concept of altered T cell functions in patients with severe disease.


Subject(s)
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/immunology , HIV-1/immunology , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Tuberculosis/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Coinfection/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Tuberculosis/pathology
14.
Clin Transl Sci ; 14(6): 2111-2116, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247160

ABSTRACT

This review describes the evidence for the potential benefit of vitamin D supplementation in people with respiratory diseases who may have a higher susceptibility to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and its consequences. Clinical evidence indicates that vitamin D may reduce the risk of both upper and lower respiratory tract infections and offers benefit particularly in people with vitamin D deficiency. Some evidence exists for a higher incidence of active tuberculosis (TB) in patients who are deficient in vitamin D. An association between low levels of 25(OH)D (the active form of vitamin D) and COVID-19 severity of illness and mortality has also been reported. In addition, low 25(OH)D levels are associated with poor outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The cytokine storm experienced in severe COVID-19 infections results from excessive release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Due to its immunomodulatory effects, adequate vitamin D levels may cause a decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokines during COVID-19 infections. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 82.2% of hospitalized COVID-19 cases and 47.2% of population-based controls (p < 0.0001). The available evidence warrants an evaluation of vitamin D supplementation in susceptible populations with respiratory diseases, such as TB, and particularly in those who are deficient in vitamin D. This may mitigate against serious complications of COVID-19 infections or reduce the impact of ARDS in those who have been infected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Dietary Supplements , Tuberculosis/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/diet therapy , Vitamin D/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Comorbidity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disease Susceptibility/blood , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Humans , Pandemics , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Tuberculosis/blood , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/complications , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology
16.
Immunol Rev ; 301(1): 98-121, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218116

ABSTRACT

BCG turns 100 this year and while it might not be the perfect vaccine, it has certainly contributed significantly towards eradication and prevention of spread of tuberculosis (TB). The search for newer and better vaccines for TB is an ongoing endeavor and latest results from trials of candidate TB vaccines such as M72AS01 look promising. However, recent encouraging data from BCG revaccination trials in adults combined with studies on mucosal and intravenous routes of BCG vaccination in non-human primate models have renewed interest in BCG for TB prevention. In addition, several well-demonstrated non-specific effects of BCG, for example, prevention of viral and respiratory infections, give BCG an added advantage. Also, BCG vaccination is currently being widely tested in human clinical trials to determine whether it protects against SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or death with detailed analyses and outcomes from several ongoing trials across the world awaited. Through this review, we attempt to bring together information on various aspects of the BCG-induced immune response, its efficacy in TB control, comparison with other candidate TB vaccines and strategies to improve its efficiency including revaccination and alternate routes of administration. Finally, we discuss the future relevance of BCG use especially in light of its several heterologous benefits.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Vaccination , Adaptive Immunity , BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage , Humans , Immunity, Heterologous , Immunity, Innate , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Immunologic Memory
17.
Vaccine ; 40(11): 1534-1539, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185298

ABSTRACT

The BCG vaccine has long been recognized for reducing the risk to suffer from infectious diseases unrelated to its target disease, tuberculosis. Evidence from human trials demonstrate substantial reductions in all-cause mortality, especially in the first week of life. Observational studies have identified an association between BCG vaccination and reduced risk of respiratory infectious disease and clinical malaria later in childhood. The mechanistic basis for these pathogen-agnostic benefits, also known as beneficial non-specific effects (NSE) of BCG have been attributed to trained immunity, or epigenetic reprogramming of hematopoietic cells that give rise to innate immune cells responding more efficiently to a broad range of pathogens. Furthermore, within trained immunity, the focus so far has been on enhanced monocyte function. However, polymorphonuclear cells, namely neutrophils, are not only major constituents of the hematopoietic compartment but functionally as well as numerically represent a prominent component of the immune system. The beneficial NSEs of the BCG vaccine on newborn sepsis was recently demonstrated to be driven by a BCG-mediated numeric increase of neutrophils (emergency granulopoiesis (EG)). And experimental evidence in animal models suggest that BCG can modulate neutrophil function as well. Together, these findings suggest that neutrophils are crucial to at least the immediate beneficial NSE of the BCG vaccine. Efforts to uncover the full gamut of mechanisms underpinning the broad beneficial effects of BCG should therefore include neutrophils at the forefront.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine , Neutrophils , BCG Vaccine/immunology , Humans , Monocytes , Neutrophils/immunology , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control , Vaccination
18.
Front Immunol ; 12: 598601, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170084

ABSTRACT

Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is the leading cause of mortality among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although treatment strategies for CM are continually being developed, the mortality rate is still high. Therefore, we need to explore more therapeutic strategies that are aimed at hindering its pathogenic mechanism. In the field of CM, several studies have observed rapid iron accumulation and lipid peroxidation within the brain, all of which are hallmarks of ferroptosis, which is a type of programmed cell death that is characterized by iron dependence and lipid peroxidation. In recent years, many studies have confirmed the involvement of ferroptosis in many diseases, including infectious diseases such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Furthermore, ferroptosis is considered as immunogenic and pro-inflammatory as the ferroptotic cells release damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) and alarmin, both of which regulate immunity and pro-inflammatory activity. Hence, we hypothesize that there might be a relationship between this unique cell death modality and CM. Herein, we review the evidence of ferroptosis in CM and consider the hypothesis that ferroptotic cell death may be involved in the cell death of CM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Ferroptosis , Iron/metabolism , Lipid Peroxidation , Meningitis, Cryptococcal/metabolism , Tuberculosis/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Ferroptosis/immunology , Glutathione/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Lipid Metabolism , Meningitis, Cryptococcal/immunology , Meningitis, Cryptococcal/pathology , Phospholipid Hydroperoxide Glutathione Peroxidase/metabolism , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/pathology
19.
Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 20(1): 106-113, 2021 Feb 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106626

ABSTRACT

Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) was designed for protecting children against tuberculosis. Also, it can protect against other infectious diseases through the induction of trained immunity. Due to its heterologous protective effects, the BCG vaccine has been proposed as atreatment option for coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Epidemiological studies have found that countries without BCG vaccination policy have experienced higher mortality rates related toCOVID-19 infection than those with BCG vaccination policy. However, there are some confounding factors such as age, population intensity, immigration, the pandemic phase, and data accuracy that may affect these results. Therefore, this hypothesis should be evaluated by clinical trial studies. Large-scale clinical trials are in progress to investigate ifthe BCG vaccine could be used as a useful tool for protection against COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mycobacterium bovis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Humans , Incidence , Iran/epidemiology , Pandemics , Policy , Tuberculosis/immunology , Vaccination
20.
J Infect Dis ; 223(2): 189-191, 2021 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101844

ABSTRACT

Developers of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 vaccines should consider some of the lessons from a "new" vaccine introduced in 1921, namely bacille Calmette-Guérin.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Tuberculosis/immunology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL