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1.
J Med Virol ; 94(4): 1502-1512, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718395

ABSTRACT

The present coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly and existing data has suggested a number of susceptibility factors for developing a severe course of the disease.  The current case-control experiment is aimed to study the associations of genetic polymorphisms in tumor necrosis factors (TNFs) with COVID-19 and its mortality rate. A total of 550 participants (275 subjects and 275 controls) were enrolled. The tetra-amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction technique was recruited to detect -308G>A TNFα and +252A>G TNFß polymorphisms among the Iranian subjects. We demonstrated that carriers of the G allele of TNFß-252A/G, rs909253 A>G were more frequent in COVID-19 subjects compared to the healthy group and this allele statistically increased the disease risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-1.96, p < 0.0001). At the same time, the A allele of TNFα-311A/G, rs1800629 G>A moderately decreased the risk of COVID-19 (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.53-0.86, p < 0.002). Also, we analyzed the various genotypes regarding the para-clinical and disorder severity; we found that in the AA genotype of TNFß-252A/G (rs909253 A>G), the computed tomography scan pattern was different in comparison to cases carrying the AG genotype with p1 < 0.001. In addition, in the severe cases of COVID-19, leukocyte and neutrophil count and duration of intensive care unit hospitalization in the deceased patients were significantly increased (p < 0.001). Moreover, the TNFα-311A/G (rs1800629 G>A) variant is likely to change the pattern of splicing factor sites. Our findings provided deep insights into the relationship between TNFα/TNFß polymorphisms and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Replicated studies may give scientific evidence for exploring molecular mechanisms of COVID-19 in other ethnicities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Lymphotoxin-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Adult , Aged , Alleles , Case-Control Studies , Computer Simulation , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics
3.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(5): 1-13, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574052

ABSTRACT

Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) biologicals, Dexamethasone and rIL-7 are of considerable interest in treating COVID-19 patients who are in danger of, or have become, seriously ill. Yet reducing sepsis mortality by lowering circulating levels of TNF lost favour when positive endpoints in earlier simplistic models could not be reproduced in well-conducted human trials. Newer information with anti-TNF biologicals has encouraged reintroducing this concept for treating COVID-19. Viral models have had encouraging outcomes, as have the effects of anti-TNF biologicals on community-acquired COVID-19 during their long-term use to treat chronic inflammatory states. The positive outcome of a large scale trial of dexamethasone, and its higher potency late in the disease, harmonises well with its capacity to enhance levels of IL-7Rα, the receptor for IL-7, a cytokine that enhances lymphocyte development and is increased during the cytokine storm. Lymphoid germinal centres required for antibody-based immunity can be harmed by TNF, and restored by reducing TNF. Thus the IL-7- enhancing activity of dexamethasone may explain its higher potency when lymphocytes are depleted later in the infection, while employing anti-TNF, for several reasons, is much more logical earlier in the infection. This implies dexamethasone could prove to be synergistic with rIL-7, currently being trialed as a COVID-19 therapeutic. The principles behind these COVID-19 therapies are consistent with the observed chronic hypoxia through reduced mitochondrial function, and also the increased severity of this disease in ApoE4-positive individuals. Many of the debilitating persistent aspects of this disease are predictably susceptible to treatment with perispinal etanercept, since they have cerebral origins.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , Interleukin-17/administration & dosage , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Humans , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
4.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 101(Pt A): 108264, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487769

ABSTRACT

Topoisomerase (TOP) inhibitors were commonly used as chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers. In our present study, we found that etoposide (ETO), a topoisomerase 2 (TOP2) inhibitor, upregulated the production of Interleukin 10 (IL-10) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Besides, other TOP2 inhibitors including doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and teniposide (TEN) were also able to augment IL-10 production. Meanwhile, the expression levels of pro-inflammatory factors, for example IL-6 and TNF-α, were also decreased accordingly by the treatment of the TOP2 inhibitors. Of note, ETO facilitated IL-10 secretion, which might be regulated by transcription factor Maf via PI3K/AKT pathway, as pharmaceutic blockage of kinase PI3K or AKT attenuated ETO-induced Maf and IL-10 expression. Further, in LPS-induced mice sepsis model, the enhanced generation of IL-10 was observed in ETO-treated mice, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokines were decreased, which significantly reduced the mortality of mice from LPS-induced lethal cytokine storm. Taken together, these results indicated that ETO may exhibit an anti-inflammatory role by upregulating the alteration of transcription factor Maf and promoting subsequential IL-10 secretion via PI3K/Akt pathway in LPS-induced macrophages. Therefore, ETO may serve as a potential anti-inflammatory agent and employed to severe pro-inflammatory diseases including COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Etoposide/pharmacology , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-maf/genetics , Topoisomerase II Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cell Line , Disease Models, Animal , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Etoposide/therapeutic use , Female , Interleukin-10/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Macrophages/drug effects , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-maf/metabolism , Shock, Septic/chemically induced , Shock, Septic/drug therapy , Topoisomerase II Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Up-Regulation/drug effects
5.
Appl Microbiol Biotechnol ; 105(4): 1447-1460, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396992

ABSTRACT

Due to their potent immune stimulation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) variants with tumor-homing activity are attractive as novel antitumor drugs. The promising antitumor effect of NGR-TNFα in clinical trials triggered extensive interest in developing novel tumor-homing TNFα variants in recent years. Owing to its promising antitumor effect, NGR-TNFα is usually used as a control for newly developed tumor-homing TNFα variants. In our previous works, we produced a pericyte-targeting Z-TNFα at high levels using the Escherichia coli (E. coli) M15-pQE30 system. To further compare Z-TNFα and NGR-TNFα, we attempted to express NGR-TNFα using the same system. Surprisingly, native NGR-TNFα was expressed at a low (~ 0.2 mg/L) level in E. coli M15 containing the pQE30 plasmid. However, a single nucleotide mutation of C to G, resulting in a substitution of leucine (L) with valine (V) at the start of TNFα, increased the expression of NGR-TNFα by ~ 100 times through improving transcription. In addition, the amino acid substitution showed a little impact on the receptor binding, in vitro cytotoxicity, and in vivo antitumor effect of NGR-TNFα. As fusing NGR to the N-terminus of TNFα with a valine substitution did not reduce the protein yield, the TNFα gene with a C > G mutation might be used to prepare novel tumor-homing TNFα when the native TNFα-based variant is expressed at an extremely low level in E. coli. Notably, in addition to the mutated valine, the impact of N-terminal additional amino acids provided by pQE30 vector on the function of TNFα variant must be carefully evaluated. KEY POINTS : • A single nucleotide mutation increased the expression of NGR-TNFα by two orders. • Nucleotide mutation-induced amino acid substitution did not reduce NGR-TNFα activity.


Subject(s)
Escherichia coli , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Cell Line, Tumor , Escherichia coli/genetics , Galanin/analogs & derivatives , Mutation , Nucleotides , Oligopeptides/genetics , Substance P/analogs & derivatives , Transcription, Genetic , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
6.
Biomolecules ; 11(5)2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389275

ABSTRACT

Several RNA viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, can infect or use the eye as an entry portal to cause ocular or systemic diseases. Povidone-Iodine (PVP-I) is routinely used during ocular surgeries and eye banking as a cost-effective disinfectant due to its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against viruses. However, whether PVP-I can exert antiviral activities in virus-infected cells remains elusive. In this study, using Zika (ZIKV) and Chikungunya (CHIKV) virus infection of human corneal and retinal pigment epithelial cells, we report antiviral mechanisms of PVP-I. Our data showed that PVP-I, even at the lowest concentration (0.01%), drastically reduced viral replication in corneal and retinal cells without causing cellular toxicity. Antiviral effects of PVP-I against ZIKV and CHIKV were mediated by direct viral inactivation, thus attenuating the ability of the virus to infect host cells. Moreover, one-minute PVP-I exposure of infected ocular cells drastically reduced viral replication and the production of infectious progeny virions. Furthermore, viral-induced (CHIKV) expression of inflammatory genes (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL1ß) were markedly reduced in PVP-I treated corneal epithelial cells. Together, our results demonstrate potent antiviral effects of PVP-I against ZIKV and CHIKV infection of ocular cells. Thus, a low dose of PVP-I can be used during tissue harvesting for corneal transplants to prevent potential transmission of RNA viruses via infected cells.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Povidone-Iodine/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/physiology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Animals , Cell Line , Chikungunya virus/physiology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/cytology , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/metabolism , Retinal Pigment Epithelium/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Vero Cells , Zika Virus/physiology
7.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100630, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333548

ABSTRACT

Unchecked inflammation can result in severe diseases with high mortality, such as macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). MAS and associated cytokine storms have been observed in COVID-19 patients exhibiting systemic hyperinflammation. Interleukin-18 (IL-18), a proinflammatory cytokine belonging to the IL-1 family, is elevated in both MAS and COVID-19 patients, and its level is known to correlate with the severity of COVID-19 symptoms. IL-18 binds its specific receptor IL-1 receptor 5 (IL-1R5, also known as IL-18 receptor alpha chain), leading to the recruitment of the coreceptor, IL-1 receptor 7 (IL-1R7, also known as IL-18 receptor beta chain). This heterotrimeric complex then initiates downstream signaling, resulting in systemic and local inflammation. Here, we developed a novel humanized monoclonal anti-IL-1R7 antibody to specifically block the activity of IL-18 and its inflammatory signaling. We characterized the function of this antibody in human cell lines, in freshly obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in human whole blood cultures. We found that the anti-IL-1R7 antibody significantly suppressed IL-18-mediated NFκB activation, reduced IL-18-stimulated IFNγ and IL-6 production in human cell lines, and reduced IL-18-induced IFNγ, IL-6, and TNFα production in PBMCs. Moreover, the anti-IL-1R7 antibody significantly inhibited LPS- and Candida albicans-induced IFNγ production in PBMCs, as well as LPS-induced IFNγ production in whole blood cultures. Our data suggest that blocking IL-1R7 could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to specifically modulate IL-18 signaling and may warrant further investigation into its clinical potential for treating IL-18-mediated diseases, including MAS and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Interleukin-18/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-18/genetics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Candida albicans/growth & development , Candida albicans/pathogenicity , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunologic Factors/biosynthesis , Inflammation , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-18/immunology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/microbiology , Lipopolysaccharides/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/drug therapy , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Primary Cell Culture , Receptors, Interleukin-18/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Interleukin-18/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 683800, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305645

ABSTRACT

The major cause of death in SARS-CoV-2 infected patients is due to de-regulation of the innate immune system and development of cytokine storm. SARS-CoV-2 infects multiple cell types in the lung, including macrophages, by engagement of its spike (S) protein on angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. ACE2 receptor initiates signals in macrophages that modulate their activation, including production of cytokines and chemokines. IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK)-M is a central regulator of inflammatory responses regulating the magnitude of TLR responsiveness. Aim of the work was to investigate whether SARS-CoV-2 S protein-initiated signals modulate pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. For this purpose, we treated PMA-differentiated THP-1 human macrophages with SARS-CoV-2 S protein and measured the induction of inflammatory mediators including IL6, TNFα, IL8, CXCL5, and MIP1a. The results showed that SARS-CoV-2 S protein induced IL6, MIP1a and TNFα mRNA expression, while it had no effect on IL8 and CXCL5 mRNA levels. We further examined whether SARS-CoV-2 S protein altered the responsiveness of macrophages to TLR signals. Treatment of LPS-activated macrophages with SARS-CoV-2 S protein augmented IL6 and MIP1a mRNA, an effect that was evident at the protein level only for IL6. Similarly, treatment of PAM3csk4 stimulated macrophages with SARS-CoV-2 S protein resulted in increased mRNA of IL6, while TNFα and MIP1a were unaffected. The results were confirmed in primary human peripheral monocytic cells (PBMCs) and isolated CD14+ monocytes. Macrophage responsiveness to TLR ligands is regulated by IRAK-M, an inactive IRAK kinase isoform. Indeed, we found that SARS-CoV-2 S protein suppressed IRAK-M mRNA and protein expression both in THP1 macrophages and primary human PBMCs and CD14+ monocytes. Engagement of SARS-CoV-2 S protein with ACE2 results in internalization of ACE2 and suppression of its activity. Activation of ACE2 has been previously shown to induce anti-inflammatory responses in macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with the ACE2 activator DIZE suppressed the pro-inflammatory action of SARS-CoV-2. Our results demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2/ACE2 interaction rendered macrophages hyper-responsive to TLR signals, suppressed IRAK-M and promoted pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Thus, activation of ACE2 may be a potential anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategy to eliminate the development of cytokine storm observed in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases/genetics , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Protein Binding , THP-1 Cells , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
9.
Mol Med Rep ; 24(2)2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1271003

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus­2 (SARS­CoV­2), led to an outbreak of viral pneumonia in December 2019. The present study aimed to investigate the host inflammatory response signature­caused by SARS­CoV­2 in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). The expression level of angiotensin­converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the human cornea was determined via immunofluorescence. In vitro experiments were performed in HCECs stimulated with the SARS­CoV­2 spike protein. Moreover, the expression levels of ACE2, IL­8, TNF­α, IL­6, gasdermin D (GSDMD) and IL­1ß in HCECs were detected using reverse transcription­quantitative PCR and/or western blotting. It was identified that ACE2 was expressed in normal human corneal epithelium and HCECs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, the expression levels of IL­8, TNF­α and IL­6 in HCECs were decreased following SARS­CoV­2 spike protein stimulation, while the expression levels of GSDMD and IL­1ß were increased. In conclusion, the present results demonstrated that the SARS­CoV­2 spike protein suppressed the host inflammatory response and induced pyroptosis in HCECs. Therefore, blocking the ACE2 receptor in HCECs may reduce the infection rate of COVID­19.


Subject(s)
Epithelium, Corneal/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Cornea/cytology , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Epithelium, Corneal/virology , Female , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/genetics , Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/genetics , Phosphate-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Pyroptosis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Up-Regulation
10.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0252758, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261297

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental kidney disease. ACE2 is on the X chromosome, and in mice, deletion of ACE2 leads to the development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The relationship between sex and renal ACE2 expression in humans with kidney disease is a gap in current knowledge. METHODS: We studied renal tubulointerstitial microarray data and clinical variables from subjects with FSGS enrolled in the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) study. We compared relationships between ACE2 expression and age, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR), interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophy, and genes implicated in inflammation and fibrosis in male and female subjects. RESULTS: ACE2 mRNA expression was lower in the tubulointerstitium of males compared to females (P = 0.0026). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that ACE2 expression was related to sex and eGFR but not to age or treatment with renin angiotensin system blockade. ACE2 expression is also related to interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy, in males but not in females. Genes involved in inflammation (CCL2 and TNF) correlated with ACE2 expression in males (TNF: r = -0.65, P < 0.0001; CCL2: r = -0.60, P < 0.0001) but not in females. TGFB1, a gene implicated in fibrosis correlated with ACE2 in both sexes. CONCLUSIONS: Sex is an important determinant of ACE2 expression in the tubulointerstitium of the kidney in FSGS. Sex also influences the relationships between ACE2, kidney fibrosis, and expression of genes involved in kidney inflammation.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Chemokine CCL2/genetics , Chemokine CCL2/metabolism , Child , Female , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/genetics , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/pathology , Humans , Kidney/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/genetics , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
11.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(6)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246687

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical consequences of SARS-CoV-2 and DENGUE virus co-infection are not promising. However, their treatment options are currently unavailable. Current studies have shown that quercetin is both resistant to COVID-19 and DENGUE; this study aimed to evaluate the possible functional roles and underlying mechanisms of action of quercetin as a potential molecular candidate against COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. METHODS: We used a series of bioinformatics analyses to understand and characterize the biological functions, pharmacological targets and therapeutic mechanisms of quercetin in COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. RESULTS: We revealed the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 and DENGUE, including pathological mechanisms, key inflammatory pathways and possible methods of intervention, 60 overlapping targets related to the co-infection and the drug were identified, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) was constructed and TNFα, CCL-2 and CXCL8 could become potential drug targets. Furthermore, we disclosed the signaling pathways, biological functions and upstream pathway activity of quercetin in COVID-19 and DENGUE. The analysis indicated that quercetin could inhibit cytokines release, alleviate excessive immune responses and eliminate inflammation, through NF-κB, IL-17 and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to reveal quercetin as a pharmacological drug for COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection remain a potential threat to the world's public health system. Therefore, we need innovative thinking to provide admissible evidence for quercetin as a potential molecule drug for the treatment of COVID-19 and DENGUE, but the findings have not been verified in actual patients, so further clinical drug trials are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dengue Virus/chemistry , Dengue/drug therapy , Quercetin/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CCL2/chemistry , Chemokine CCL2/drug effects , Chemokine CCL2/genetics , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/genetics , Coinfection/virology , Dengue/complications , Dengue/genetics , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/drug effects , Humans , Interleukin-17/genetics , Interleukin-8/chemistry , Interleukin-8/drug effects , Interleukin-8/genetics , NF-kappa B/drug effects , NF-kappa B/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps/drug effects , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/chemistry , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(10)2021 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236794

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) afflicts approximately 200,000 patients annually and has a 40% mortality rate. The COVID-19 pandemic has massively increased the rate of ALI incidence. The pathogenesis of ALI involves tissue damage from invading microbes and, in severe cases, the overexpression of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß). This study aimed to develop a therapy to normalize the excess production of inflammatory cytokines and promote tissue repair in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Based on our previous studies, we tested the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and BTP-2 therapies. IGF-I was selected, because we and others have shown that elevated inflammatory cytokines suppress the expression of growth hormone receptors in the liver, leading to a decrease in the circulating IGF-I. IGF-I is a growth factor that increases vascular protection, enhances tissue repair, and decreases pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is also required to produce anti-inflammatory 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. BTP-2, an inhibitor of cytosolic calcium, was used to suppress the LPS-induced increase in cytosolic calcium, which otherwise leads to an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. We showed that LPS increased the expression of the primary inflammatory mediators such as toll like receptor-4 (TLR-4), IL-1ß, interleukin-17 (IL-17), TNF-α, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), which were normalized by the IGF-I + BTP-2 dual therapy in the lungs, along with improved vascular gene expression markers. The histologic lung injury score was markedly elevated by LPS and reduced to normal by the combination therapy. In conclusion, the LPS-induced increases in inflammatory cytokines, vascular injuries, and lung injuries were all improved by IGF-I + BTP-2 combination therapy.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Anilides/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/pharmacology , Thiadiazoles/pharmacology , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Anilides/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Calcium/metabolism , Calcium Channels/metabolism , Cytokines/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Immunohistochemistry , Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/metabolism , Insulin-Like Growth Factor I/therapeutic use , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Interleukin-17/genetics , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Signal Transduction/genetics , Thiadiazoles/therapeutic use , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
13.
J Int Med Res ; 49(3): 3000605211002695, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145418

ABSTRACT

Over the past several decades, studies have demonstrated the existence of bi-directional relationships between periodontal disease and systemic conditions. Periodontitis is a polymicrobial and multifactorial disease involving both host and environmental factors. Tissue destruction is primarily associated with hyperresponsiveness of the host resulting in release of inflammatory mediators. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play a major role in bacterial stimulation and tissue destruction. In addition, these cytokines are thought to underlie the associations between periodontitis and systemic conditions. Current research suggests that increased release of cytokines from host cells, referred to as the cytokine storm, is associated with disease progression in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). An intersection between periodontitis and pulmonary disease is biologically plausible. Hence, we reviewed the evidence linking COVID-19, cytokines, and periodontal disease. Plaque control is essential to prevent exchange of bacteria between the mouth and the lungs, reducing the risk of lung disease. Understanding these associations may help identify individuals at high risk and deliver appropriate care at early stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Dental Plaque/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Periodontitis/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stress, Psychological/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Dental Plaque/complications , Dental Plaque/genetics , Dental Plaque/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-10/genetics , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/immunology , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/metabolism , Periodontitis/complications , Periodontitis/genetics , Periodontitis/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/genetics , Stress, Psychological/virology , Tooth/immunology , Tooth/pathology , Tooth/virology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
14.
FEBS J ; 289(4): 883-900, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099705

ABSTRACT

Pneumonia is a serious complication associated with inflammation of the lungs due to infection with viral pathogens. Seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses, variola virus (agent of smallpox) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2; agent of COVID-19) are some leading examples. Viral pneumonia is triggered by excessive inflammation associated with dysregulated cytokine production, termed 'cytokine storm'. Several cytokines have been implicated but tumour necrosis factor (TNF) plays a critical role in driving lung inflammation, severe lung pathology and death. Despite this, the exact role TNF plays in the aetiology and pathogenesis of virus infection-induced respiratory complications is not well understood. In this review, we discuss the pathological and immunomodulatory roles of TNF in contributing to immunopathology and resolution of lung inflammation, respectively, in mouse models of influenza- and smallpox (mousepox)-induced pneumonia. We review studies that have investigated dampening of inflammation on the outcome of severe influenza and orthopoxvirus infections. Most studies on the influenza model have evaluated the efficacy of treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs, including anti-TNF agents, in animal models on the day of viral infection. We question the merits of those studies as they are not transferable to the clinic given that individuals generally present at a hospital only after the onset of disease symptoms and not on the day of infection. We propose that research should be directed at determining whether dampening lung inflammation after the onset of disease symptoms will reduce morbidity and mortality. Such a treatment strategy will be more relevant clinically.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor/metabolism , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
15.
Immunol Invest ; 51(3): 546-557, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969122

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tumor necrosis factor-ɑ (TNF-ɑ) is one of the most important cytokines that manage the host defense mechanism, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 patients. The work aims to study the association of TNF-ɑ G-308 A gene polymorphism with the course and outcome of COVID-19 patients in Mansoura University Hospital. METHODS: 900 patients with COVID-19 infection and 184 controls were tested for TNF-ɑ G-308 A promoter polymorphism. Different genotypes of TNF-ɑ G-308 A were compared as regards the severity and prognosis of the disease. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found between patients and controls as regards the demographic data. The AA genotype of TNF-ɑ showed a higher incidence of the disease in comparison to the other genotypes. As regards the demographic and laboratory characters, no statistically significant difference was found between the different genotypes except for age, lymphopenia, CRP, and serum ferritin levels. In 336(80.0%) cases of the AA genotype, the disease was severe in comparison to 90(41.7%) cases in the GA genotype and no cases in the GG genotype with P = .001. CONCLUSION: People who carry the A allele of TNF-ɑ polymorphism are more prone to COVID-19 infection. The AA genotype of TNF-ɑ is associated with a more aggressive pattern of the disease. In those patients, the use of anti - TNF therapy may be promising.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , COVID-19/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , Humans , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
16.
Pathog Dis ; 79(1)2021 01 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963763

ABSTRACT

A vast proportion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) individuals remain asymptomatic and can shed severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) type 2 virus to transmit the infection, which also explains the exponential increase in the number of COVID-19 cases globally. Furthermore, the rate of recovery from clinical COVID-19 in certain pockets of the globe is surprisingly high. Based on published reports and available literature, here, we speculated a few immunovirological mechanisms as to why a vast majority of individuals remain asymptomatic similar to exotic animal (bats and pangolins) reservoirs that remain refractile to disease development despite carrying a huge load of diverse insidious viral species, and whether such evolutionary advantage would unveil therapeutic strategies against COVID-19 infection in humans. Understanding the unique mechanisms that exotic animal species employ to achieve viral control, as well as inflammatory regulation, appears to hold key clues to the development of therapeutic versatility against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/immunology , Receptors, KIR/immunology , Receptors, NK Cell Lectin-Like/immunology , Zoonoses/immunology , Animals , Animals, Exotic/virology , Asymptomatic Diseases , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Chiroptera/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disease Reservoirs , Eutheria/virology , Gene Expression , Host Specificity , Humans , Immune Tolerance , Immunity, Innate , Interferon-beta/deficiency , Interferon-beta/genetics , Interferon-beta/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/virology , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/deficiency , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/genetics , Receptors, KIR/deficiency , Receptors, KIR/genetics , Receptors, NK Cell Lectin-Like/deficiency , Receptors, NK Cell Lectin-Like/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/deficiency , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology , Zoonoses/genetics , Zoonoses/transmission , Zoonoses/virology
17.
Steroids ; 165: 108759, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917434

ABSTRACT

Gastric ulcers are a very common public health problem affecting up to 10% worldwide. Russelioside B is a steroidal glycoside isolated from several Caralluma species. No study tested the ulcer healing potential of the compound. The current study aimed to assess the protective effect of russelioside B against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Ulcer was induced on rats by a single intragastric dose of absolute ethanol (5 mL/kg). Rats were randomly assorted into four groups (n = 8) and given treatments (Antodine, 20 mg/kg or russelioside B, 50 mg/kg) by oral gavage 1 h before ulcer induction. Pretreatment with russelioside B (50 mg/kg) attenuated the gastric mucosal injury as proved by a decrease of ulcer index, and histological scores. It suppressed the gastric inflammation by a significant lowering the tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels with myeloperoxidase activity (which are also aggravating factors in the case of Covid-19 infection). In addition, administration of russelioside B halted the gastric oxidative stress via inhibition of lipid peroxides by maintaining reduced glutathione and by decreasing malondialdehyde. It was able also to restore the sharp drop in the levels of heat shock protein-70, vascular endothelial growth factor and prostaglandin E2 induced by ethanol. Additionally, it showed carbonic anhydrase inhibition activity. The gastroprotective action of russelioside B was umpired through multi mechanistic actions; suppression of gastric oxidative stress, inflammation, anti-apoptotic activities and enhanced gastric mucosal protection by up-regulation of endothelial growth factor, normalization of heat shock protein-70 and prostaglandin E2. These actions were comparable in part to some classical antiulcer drugs such as Antodine.


Subject(s)
Dinoprostone/genetics , Glycosides/pharmacology , HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Pregnanes/pharmacology , Stomach Ulcer/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Ulcer Agents/pharmacology , Apocynaceae/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Ethanol/toxicity , Gastric Mucosa/drug effects , Gastric Mucosa/pathology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Glycosides/chemistry , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Peroxidase/genetics , Pregnanes/chemistry , Rats , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stomach Ulcer/chemically induced , Stomach Ulcer/genetics , Stomach Ulcer/pathology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
18.
In Vivo ; 34(6): 3723-3730, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910223

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Influenza viruses, corona viruses and related pneumotropic viruses cause sickness and death partly by inducing cytokine storm, a hyper-proinflammatory host response by immune cells and cytokines in the host airway. Based on our in vivo experience with digitoxin as an inhibitor of TNFα-driven NFĸB signaling for cytokine expression in prostate cancer in rats and in cystic fibrosis in humans, we hypothesize that this drug will also block a virally-activated cytokine storm. Materials Methods: Digitoxin was administered intraperitoneally to cotton rats, followed by intranasal infection with 107TCID50/100 g of cotton rat with influenza strain A/Wuhan/H3N2/359/95. Daily digitoxin treatment continued until harvest on day 4 of the experiment. RESULTS: The cardiac glycoside digitoxin significantly and differentially suppressed levels of the cytokines TNFα, GRO/KC, MIP2, MCP1, and IFNγ, in the cotton rat lung in the presence of influenza virus. CONCLUSION: Since cytokine storm is a host response, we suggest that digitoxin may have a therapeutic potential not only for influenza and but also for coronavirus infections.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Digitoxin/pharmacology , Lung/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Animals , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/virology , Lung/pathology , Male , NF-kappa B/genetics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/virology , Rats , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
19.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 235, 2020 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841900

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection can lead to respiratory illness and multi-organ failure in critically ill patients. Although the virus-induced lung damage and inflammatory cytokine storm are believed to be directly associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical manifestations, the underlying mechanisms of virus-triggered inflammatory responses are currently unknown. Here we report that SARS-CoV-2 infection activates caspase-8 to trigger cell apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine processing in the lung epithelial cells. The processed inflammatory cytokines are released through the virus-induced necroptosis pathway. Virus-induced apoptosis, necroptosis, and inflammation activation were also observed in the lung sections of SARS-CoV-2-infected HFH4-hACE2 transgenic mouse model, a valid model for studying SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. Furthermore, analysis of the postmortem lung sections of fatal COVID-19 patients revealed not only apoptosis and necroptosis but also massive inflammatory cell infiltration, necrotic cell debris, and pulmonary interstitial fibrosis, typical of immune pathogenesis in the lung. The SARS-CoV-2 infection triggered a dual mode of cell death pathways and caspase-8-dependent inflammatory responses may lead to the lung damage in the COVID-19 patients. These discoveries might assist the development of therapeutic strategies to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Apoptosis/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Caspase 8/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Necroptosis/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Animals , COVID-19 , Caspase 8/genetics , Cell Line, Tumor , Chemokine CCL5/genetics , Chemokine CCL5/immunology , Chemokine CXCL10/genetics , Chemokine CXCL10/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Epithelial Cells/immunology , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-7/genetics , Interleukin-7/immunology , Interleukin-8/genetics , Interleukin-8/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/genetics , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
20.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 186, 2020 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744366

ABSTRACT

Sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) is activated by cytokines or pathogen, such as virus or bacteria, but its association with diminished cholesterol levels in COVID-19 patients is unknown. Here, we evaluated SREBP-2 activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COVID-19 patients and verified the function of SREBP-2 in COVID-19. Intriguingly, we report the first observation of SREBP-2 C-terminal fragment in COVID-19 patients' blood and propose SREBP-2 C-terminal fragment as an indicator for determining severity. We confirmed that SREBP-2-induced cholesterol biosynthesis was suppressed by Sestrin-1 and PCSK9 expression, while the SREBP-2-induced inflammatory responses was upregulated in COVID-19 ICU patients. Using an infectious disease mouse model, inhibitors of SREBP-2 and NF-κB suppressed cytokine storms caused by viral infection and prevented pulmonary damages. These results collectively suggest that SREBP-2 can serve as an indicator for severity diagnosis and therapeutic target for preventing cytokine storm and lung damage in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cholesterol/biosynthesis , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 2/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Heat-Shock Proteins/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/genetics , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Primary Cell Culture , Proprotein Convertase 9/genetics , Proprotein Convertase 9/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 2/immunology , Survival Analysis , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
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