Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 50
Filter
1.
Rev Bras Ginecol Obstet ; 43(10): 765-774, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517657

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate depression and sexual function among pregnant and non-pregnant women throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A total of 188 women, 96 pregnant and 92 non-pregnant were included. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) were applied to the participants after obtaining sociodemographic data. RESULTS: The depression scores of pregnant and non-pregnant women were similar (p = 0.846). We found that the depression scores were significantly higher among the group of participants who have lower economic status (p = 0.046). Moreover, the depression score was significantly higher among women who lost their income during the pandemic (p = 0.027). The score on the ASEX was significantly higher, and sexual dysfunction was more prevalent among women who have lower levels of schooling and income (p < 0.05). Likewise, the ASEX scores were significantly higher (p = 0.019) among the group who experienced greater income loss throughout the pandemic. Upon comparing the pregnant and non-pregnant groups, we detected that sexual dysfunction had a significantly higher rate among pregnant women (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: In times of global crisis, such as the current pandemic, low-income families have an increased risk of experiencing depression and sexual dysfunction. When we compared pregnant women with non-pregnant women, depression scores were similar, but pregnant women were at a 6.2 times higher risk of developing sexual dysfunction.


Investigar a depressão e as funções sexuais de mulheres grávidas e não grávidas durante a pandemia de Covid-19. MéTODOS: Um total de 188 mulheres, 96 grávidas e 92 não grávidas, foram incluídas. O Inventário de Depressão de Beck (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI, em inglês) e a Escala de Experiências Sexuais do Arizona (Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, ASEX, em inglês) foram aplicados aos participantes após a obtenção dos dados sociodemográficos.As pontuações de depressão de mulheres grávidas e não grávidas foram semelhantes (p = 0,846). Verificou-se que as pontuações de depressão foram significativamente maiores no grupo de participantes de menor nível econômico (p = 0,046). Além disso, a pontuação de depressão foi significativamente maior em mulheres que perderam sua renda durante a pandemia (p = 0,027). A pontuação na ASEX foi significativamente maior, e a disfunção sexual foi mais prevalente em pessoas com menores escolaridade e nível de renda (p < 0,05). Da mesma forma, as pontuações na ASEX foram significativamente mais altas (p = 0,019) no grupo que experimentou maior perda de renda durante a pandemia. Ao comparar os grupos de gestantes e não gestantes, detectou-se que a disfunção sexual apresentava índice significativamente maior entre as gestantes (p <0,001). CONCLUSãO: Em tempos de crise global, como a atual pandemia, famílias de baixa renda têm um risco maior de sofrer depressão e disfunção sexual. Quando comparamos mulheres grávidas e mulheres não grávidas, as pontuações de depressão foram semelhantes, mas as mulheres grávidas apresentaram um risco 6,2 vezes maior de desenvolver disfunção sexual.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnant Women/psychology , Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Economic Factors , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Turkey/epidemiology , Unemployment/psychology , Young Adult
3.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255050, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331997

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The present study aimed to investigate whether the psychological impact of the COVID-19 crisis varied with regards to young Swiss men's pre-crisis level of education and socioeconomic status and to changes in their work situation due to it. METHODS: A cohort of 2345 young Swiss men (from 21 out of 26 Swiss cantons; mean age = 29) completed survey-based assessments shortly before (April 2019 to February 2020) and early on during the COVID-19 crisis (May to June 2020). Outcomes measured were psychological outcomes before and during the COVID-19 crisis (depression, perceived stress and sleep quality), and the fear, isolation and psychological trauma induced by it. We investigated associations between these outcomes and their predictors: pre-crisis socioeconomic status (relative financial status, difficulty paying bills, level of education), changes in work situation during the crisis (job loss, partial unemployment, working from home, change in workload) and working in contact with potentially infected people, both inside and outside the healthcare sector. For outcomes measured before and during the crisis, the analyses were adjusted for their pre-crisis levels. RESULTS: About 21% of participants changed their employment status (job loss, partial unemployment or lost money if self-employed) and more than 40% worked predominantly from home during the COVID-19 crisis. Participants with a lower relative socioeconomic status already before the crisis experienced a higher psychological impact due to the COVID-19 crisis, compared to participants with an average socioeconomic status (major depression (b = 0.12 [0.03, 0.22]), perceived stress (b = 0.15 [0.05, 0.25]), psychological trauma (b = 0.15 [0.04, 0.26]), fear (b = 0.20 [0.10, 0.30]) and isolation (b = 0.19 [0.08, 0.29])). A higher impact was also felt by participants who lost their job due to the COVID-19 crisis, the partially unemployed, those with an increased workload or those who worked mainly from home (e.g. depression b = 0.25 [0.16, 0.34] for those working 90%+ at home, compared to those not working at home). CONCLUSIONS: Even in a country like Switzerland, with relatively high social security benefits and universal healthcare, the COVID-19 crisis had a considerable psychological impact, especially among those with a lower socioeconomic status and those who experienced deteriorations in their work situation due to the COVID-19 crisis. Supporting these populations during the crisis may help to prevent an amplification of inequalities in mental health and social status. Such support could help to lower the overall impact of the crisis on the mental well-being of Switzerland's population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Men/psychology , Adult , Cohort Studies , Depression/psychology , Employment/psychology , Fear/psychology , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Social Class , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Switzerland , Unemployment/psychology
5.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(5): e283-e293, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301401

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether patterns of work during COVID-19 pandemic altered by effort to contain the outbreak affected anxiety and depression. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 911 residents of Philadelphia, inquiring about their working lives during early months of the epidemic, symptoms of anxiety and depression, plus demographics, perceived sources of support, and general health. RESULTS: Occupational contact with suspected COVID-19 cases was associated with anxiety. Concerns about return to work, childcare, lack of sick leave, and loss/reduction in work correlated with anxiety and depression, even when there was no evidence of occupational contact with infected persons; patterns differed by sex. CONCLUSIONS: Heightened anxiety and depression during COVID-19 pandemic can be due to widespread disruption of working lives, especially in "non-essential" low-income industries, on par with experience in healthcare.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Employment/classification , Employment/psychology , Adult , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Philadelphia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teleworking , Unemployment/psychology
6.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(4): 518-529, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236065

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this article is to simultaneously advance theory and practice by understanding how the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic relates to new hire engagement. Prior research suggests starting a new job is an uncertain experience; we theorize that the COVID-19 pandemic creates additional environmental stressors that affect new hire engagement. First, we hypothesize that the occurrence of COVID-19 and unemployment rates relate negatively to engagement. Second, we theorize that the effects of the pandemic become more disruptive on new hire engagement as they gain tenure within the organization. Third, drawing from strategic management theory, we test whether States that introduce stronger COVID-19 policies help enhance the engagement of new hires. Examining a U.S. national sample of 12,577 newly hired (90 days or less) quick service restaurant employees across 9 months (January-September, 2020), we find support for these hypotheses. Subsequent model comparisons suggest there may be health stressors that shape engagement more strongly than purely economic stressors. These findings may be important because they highlight the experiences of workers more likely to be exposed to the pandemic and affected by COVID-related policies. Should the results generalize to other samples and jobs, this study offers potentially new research directions for understanding relationships between macro stressors and new hire perceptions and socialization. It also offers practical implications by helping organizations understand the importance of explicitly managing job insecurity, particularly in terms of COVID-19 policy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Pandemics/legislation & jurisprudence , State Government , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Work Engagement , Workplace/legislation & jurisprudence , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personnel Selection/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Unemployment/psychology , United States , Young Adult
7.
New Solut ; 31(2): 107-112, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232404

ABSTRACT

The global political economy is generating new forms and growing shares of informal, insecure, and precarious labor, adding to histories of insecure work and an externalization of social costs. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the consequences of ignoring such signals in terms of the increased risk and vulnerability of insecure labor. This paper explores how such trends are generating intersecting adverse health outcomes for workers, communities, and environments and the implications for breaking siloes and building links between the paradigms, science, practice, and tools for occupational health, public health, and eco-health. Applying the principle of controlling hazards at the source is argued in this context to call for an understanding of the upstream production and socio-political factors that are jointly affecting the nature of work and employment and their impact on the health of workers, the public, and the planet.


Subject(s)
Employment , Occupational Health/trends , Adolescent , Africa, Eastern , Africa, Southern , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment/psychology , Employment/standards , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Politics , Public Health , Unemployment/psychology , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/psychology , Workplace/standards , Young Adult
8.
Med J Aust ; 214(10): 462-468, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202345

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To estimate initial levels of symptoms of depression and anxiety, and their changes during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia; to identify trajectories of symptoms of depression and anxiety; to identify factors associated with these trajectories. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Longitudinal cohort study; seven fortnightly online surveys of a representative sample of 1296 Australian adults from the beginning of COVID-19-related restrictions in late March 2020 to mid-June 2020. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms of depression and anxiety, measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression and Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scales; trajectories of symptom change. RESULTS: Younger age, being female, greater COVID-19-related work and social impairment, COVID-19-related financial distress, having a neurological or mental illness diagnosis, and recent adversity were each significantly associated with higher baseline depression and anxiety scores. Growth mixture models identified three latent trajectories for depression symptoms (low throughout the study, 81% of participants; moderate throughout the study, 10%; initially severe then declining, 9%) and four for anxiety symptoms (low throughout the study, 77%; initially moderate then increasing, 10%; initially moderate then declining, 5%; initially mild then increasing before again declining, 8%). Factors statistically associated with not having a low symptom trajectory included mental disorder diagnoses, COVID-19-related financial distress and social and work impairment, and bushfire exposure. CONCLUSION: Our longitudinal data enabled identification of distinct symptom trajectories during the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. Early intervention to ensure that vulnerable people are clinically and socially supported during a pandemic should be a priority.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Australia/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Financial Stress/psychology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , Teleworking , Unemployment/psychology , Young Adult
9.
Midwifery ; 99: 103013, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185181

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the mental health of pregnant women during the early and peak stages of the Covid-19 outbreak DESIGN: Online survey PARTICIPANTS: Pregnant women over the age of 18 years with no mental disorder during the pre-pregnancy period (N = 729). MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: Mental disorders were assessed using the "Depression Anxiety Stress Scale" and social support was determined using the "Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale." Pregnant women had moderate levels of anxiety and depression and mild levels of stress. Anxiety, depression, and stress of moderate or high severity was reported in 62.2%, 44.6%, and 32.2% of the women, respectively. Pregnant women who lost their jobs during the pandemic period showed a 3-fold increase in the risk of anxiety, a 6-fold increase in the risk of depression, and a 4.8-fold increase in the risk of stress. An increase in the perception of social support has protective effects against all three mental disorders during pregnancy. In pregnant women with at least one obstetric risk, the risk of antenatal anxiety is 2 times higher than that in women with no risk. Similarly, women with a chronic physical illness before pregnancy have a higher risk of anxiety during pregnancy than healthy women. Financial strain has predictive value for anxiety and depression, and advanced age is a predictor for depression. KEY CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of mental disorders in pregnant women during the pandemic period was much higher than that during the pre-pandemic period. The high frequency of antenatal mental disorders can lead to an increase in the frequency of obstetric and maternal complications in the short and long term. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Early detection of inadequate social support and economic difficulties of pregnant women during the pandemic period is recommended for protecting their mental health. Pregnant women should have easy access to psychosocial support, and they should be provided obstetric counseling during the pandemic conditions.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Pregnancy Complications , Stress, Psychological , Unemployment/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Maternal Health , Mental Health/trends , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications/psychology , Prenatal Care/methods , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Turkey/epidemiology
10.
Adm Policy Ment Health ; 48(3): 388-392, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163075

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused massive unemployment, exacerbated pre-existing behavioral health (mental health and substance use) disorders for many people, and created new disorders for others. Although policy changes have increased health care and unemployment benefits, most people want jobs and self-sufficiency rather than handouts. A robust evidence base shows that supported employment can enable unemployed people with behavioral health conditions to find competitive, integrated employment and behavioral health supports. Millions of U.S. citizens may need these services as the pandemic recedes and jobs become available. Government attention to supported employment is necessary now more than ever.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment, Supported/organization & administration , Mental Health , Unemployment/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
11.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249352, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158247

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Existing literature on how employment loss affects depression has struggled to address potential endogeneity bias caused by reverse causality. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique natural experiment because the source of unemployment is very likely to be exogenous to the individual. This study assessed the effect of job loss and job furlough on the mental health of individuals in South Africa during the COVID-19 pandemic. DATA AND METHODS: The data for the study came from the first and second waves of the national survey, the National Income Dynamics-Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey (NIDS-CRAM), conducted during May-June and July-August 2020, respectively. The sample for NIDS-CRAM was drawn from an earlier national survey, conducted in 2017, which had collected data on mental health. Questions on depressive symptoms during the lockdown were asked in Wave 2 of NIDS-CRAM, using a 2-question version of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2). The PHQ-2 responses (0-6 on the discrete scale) were regrouped into four categories making the ordered logit regression model the most suited for assessing the impact of employment status on depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The study revealed that adults who retained paid employment during the COVID-19 lockdown had significantly lower depression scores than adults who lost employment. The benefits of employment also accumulated over time, underscoring the effect of unemployment duration on mental health. The analysis revealed no mental health benefits to being furloughed (on unpaid leave), but paid leave had a strong and significant positive effect on the mental health of adults. CONCLUSIONS: The economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in unprecedented job losses, which impaired mental wellbeing significantly. Health policy responses to the crisis therefore need to focus on both physical and mental health interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , South Africa/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/psychology , Young Adult
12.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 607, 2021 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158203

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the association between food insecurity and mental health outcomes among low-income Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a survey of 2714 low-income respondents nationwide from June 29, 2020 to July 21, 2020. A proportional odds logit model was employed to estimate the associations between food insecurity and anxiety and between food insecurity and depression. RESULTS: Food insecurity is associated with a 257% higher risk of anxiety and a 253% higher risk of depression. Losing a job during the pandemic is associated with a 32% increase in risk for anxiety and a 27% increase in risk for depression. CONCLUSIONS: Food insecurity caused by the pandemic was associated with increased risk of mental illness. The relative risk of mental illness from being food insecure is almost three-fold that of losing a job during the pandemic. Public health measures should focus on getting direct subsidies of food purchases to poor families, especially families with children. They should also reduce the stigma and shame that is associated with accepting charitable foods.


Subject(s)
Depression/epidemiology , Food Insecurity , Food Supply/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Pandemics , Unemployment/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
13.
Front Public Health ; 9: 630620, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1128012

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) ineluctably caused social distancing and unemployment, which may bring additional health risks for patients with cancer. To investigate the association of the pandemic-related impacts with the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with melanoma during the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted a cross-sectional study among Chinese patients with melanoma. A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed to melanoma patients through social media. Demographic and clinical data, and pandemic-related impacts (unemployment and income loss) were collected. HRQoL was determined by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) and its disease-specific module (the melanoma subscale, MS). A total of 135 patients with melanoma completed the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.8 ± 14.2 years, 48.1% (65/135) were male, and 17.04% (34/135) were unemployed since the epidemic. Unemployment of the patients and their family members and income loss were significantly associated with a lower FACT-G score, while the MS score was associated with the unemployment of the patients' family members. Our findings suggested that unemployment is associated with impaired HRQoL in melanoma patients during the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
/psychology , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/psychology , Melanoma/economics , Melanoma/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Unemployment/psychology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Melanoma/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data
15.
Eur Psychiatry ; 64(1): e18, 2021 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1123673

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a major threat to the public. However, the comprehensive profile of suicidal ideation among the general population has not been systematically investigated in a large sample in the age of COVID-19. METHODS: A national online cross-sectional survey was conducted between February 28, 2020 and March 11, 2020 in a representative sample of Chinese adults aged 18 years and older. Suicidal ideation was assessed using item 9 of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The prevalence of suicidal ideation and its risk factors was evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 56,679 participants (27,149 males and 29,530 females) were included. The overall prevalence of suicidal ideation was 16.4%, including 10.9% seldom, 4.1% often, and 1.4% always suicidal ideation. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher in males (19.1%) and individuals aged 18-24 years (24.7%) than in females (14.0%) and those aged 45 years and older (11.9%). Suicidal ideation was more prevalent in individuals with suspected or confirmed infection (63.0%), frontline workers (19.2%), and people with pre-existing mental disorders (41.6%). Experience of quarantine, unemployed, and increased psychological stress during the pandemic were associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and its severity. However, paying more attention to and gaining a better understanding of COVID-19-related knowledge, especially information about psychological interventions, could reduce the risk. CONCLUSIONS: The estimated prevalence of suicidal ideation among the general population in China during COVID-19 was significant. The findings will be important for improving suicide prevention strategies during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Suicidal Ideation , Adolescent , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Quarantine/psychology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Suicide/prevention & control , Suicide/psychology , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Unemployment/psychology , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
16.
J Occup Rehabil ; 31(3): 455-462, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114310

ABSTRACT

Purpose To determine if losing work during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with mental and physical health status. To determine if social interactions and financial resources moderate the relationship between work loss and health. Methods Participants were Australians aged 18 + years that were employed in paid work prior to the COVID-19 pandemic who responded to an online or telephone survey from 27th March to 12th June 2020 as part of a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Outcome measures include Kessler-6 score > 18 indicating high psychological distress, and Short Form 12 (SF-12) mental health or physical health component score < = 45 indicating poor mental or physical health. Results The cohort consisted of 2,603 respondents, including groups who had lost their job (N = 541), were not working but remained employed (N = 613), were working less (N = 660), and whose work was unaffected (N = 789). Three groups experiencing work loss had greater odds of high psychological distress (AOR = 2.22-3.66), poor mental (AOR = 1.78-2.27) and physical health (AOR = 2.10-2.12) than the unaffected work group. Poor mental health was more common than poor physical health. The odds of high psychological distress (AOR = 5.43-8.36), poor mental (AOR = 1.92-4.53) and physical health (AOR = 1.93-3.90) were increased in those reporting fewer social interactions or less financial resources. Conclusion Losing work during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with mental and physical health problems, and this relationship is moderated by social interactions and financial resources. Responses that increase financial security and enhance social connections may alleviate the health impacts of work loss. Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12620000857909.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Status , Mental Health , Pandemics , Unemployment/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Australia/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Young Adult
17.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 272: 113952, 2021 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087047

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: There are plant species used in the Mexican traditional medicine for the empirical treatment of anxiety and depression. AIM OF THE STUDY: This work assessed the prevalence of self-medication with medicinal plants and the prevalence of the concomitant use of prescribed psychiatric drugs and medicinal plants for treating symptoms associated with anxiety and depression during the Covid-19 lockdown in Mexico. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The suspected adverse reactions associated with drug-herb interactions were assessed. The factors associated with self-medication, the concomitant use of herb-drug combinations, and the presence of adverse reactions due their combined use is also reported. The study was descriptive and cross-sectional using an online questionnaire conducted among population with symptoms associated with anxiety and depression (n = 2100) from seven states of central-western Mexico. RESULTS: The prevalence of the use of herbs (61.9%) and the concomitant use of drug-herb combinations (25.3%) were associated with being diagnosed with mental illness [OR:2.195 (1.655-2.912)] and the use of psychiatric medications [OR:307.994 (178.609-531.107)], respectively. The presence of adverse reactions (n = 104) by the concomitant use of drug-herb combinations was associated with being unemployed [p = 0.004, OR: 3.017 (1.404-6.486)]. CONCLUSION: Health professionals should be aware if their patients concomitantly use medicinal plants and psychiatric drugs. Public health campaigns should promote the possible adverse reactions that might produce the concomitant use of drug-herb combinations for mental illnesses.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/drug therapy , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/drug therapy , Pandemics , Plant Preparations/adverse effects , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Drug Interactions , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/drug therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Plants, Medicinal , Prevalence , Psychotropic Drugs/adverse effects , Psychotropic Drugs/therapeutic use , Self Care , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/psychology , Young Adult
18.
Fam Syst Health ; 38(4): 482-485, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085433

ABSTRACT

There is opportunity in every crisis. COVID-19 has presented an unprecedented crisis. What opportunity can be gleaned from it? Unlike crises in the more recent past, such as the bombing of the Twin Towers and Pentagon on 9/11, COVID-19 is an ongoing global pandemic, affecting nearly every person on the planet in some shape or form. It is not only the physical effects of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that are lethal; the mental health effects are also taking their toll. The impact of physical distancing, stay-at-home orders, job loss, isolation, and fear have resulted in a considerably greater number of people's experiencing symptoms of anxiety disorder and depressive disorder in the United States. Accessing health care services has been a particular challenge given concerns about exposure to the virus and an overwhelmed health care delivery system. In response, policymakers at the federal and state levels implemented changes aimed at addressing access to essential care to include telehealth services. As the public experiences firsthand the struggles of coping with mental health issues in a fragmented dysfunctional health system, there is an opportunity is to use this crisis as a springboard to advocate for permanent changes to promote telehealth, to elevate the importance of integrated behavioral health, and to support the destigmatization of mental illness. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S./organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Family Health , Health Policy , Humans , Insurance, Health, Reimbursement , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Unemployment/psychology , United States/epidemiology
19.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 334, 2021 02 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083734

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has caused mental health problems and increased unemployment due to the economic recession. This survey aimed to assess the psychological impact of the state of emergency. We estimated changes in mental health, quality of life, and unemployment experience for general workers during the first COVID-19 outbreak in Japan. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide follow-up study. During the periods of March 26 to April 6, 2020 and June 26 to July 2, 2020, we used the internet to survey general workers aged 15 to 59 years in Japan. The questionnaire items covered employment status and socioeconomic factors, and we used the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and EQ-5D-5L to assess depression and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), respectively. The differences in outcomes of permanent and non-permanent workers were analyzed using propensity score analysis. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between unemployment and CES-D scores. RESULTS: We included 2351 subjects in the analysis. Changes in both CES-D scores and utility were not significantly different between the two groups. However, a significant difference was found regarding the rate of unemployment, which was associated with higher CES-D scores. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrated that the mental health of non-permanent workers was not negatively affected following the state of emergency due to COVID-19 in Japan. Unemployment is an important factor that influences the mental health of general workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Unemployment/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Economic Recession , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
20.
Soc Sci Med ; 269: 113557, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060525

ABSTRACT

The tremendous job loss and wage cuts during the COVID-19 pandemic raises concerns about the mental health of the population. The impacts of income shocks on mental health may differ across U.S. states during the pandemic, as states have different policy contexts that likely influence mental health. The present study uses survey data from the Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey (April-July 2020) to examine whether mental health outcomes vary across U.S. states and to what extent specific state-level contexts moderate the associations between household income shocks and depression (n = 582,440) and anxiety (n = 582,796). We find that the prevalence of depression and anxiety differs across states by household income shock status. For individuals, living in a state with supportive social policies - primarily those related to Medicaid, unemployment insurance, and suspended utility shut offs during the pandemic - weakens the association between household income shocks and mental health. Findings suggest that the lack of a strong federal response to the pandemic alongside the devolution of federal power to states over the past 40 years contributes to inequalities in mental health across states. We provide insight about how specific existing and emergency-related policies can reduce adverse mental health consequences of household income shocks.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Income/statistics & numerical data , Public Policy , State Government , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Salaries and Fringe Benefits/economics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...