Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 25
Filter
1.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(31): e2121453119, 2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1960614

ABSTRACT

Human ZAP inhibits many viruses, including HIV and coronaviruses, by binding to viral RNAs to promote their degradation and/or translation suppression. However, the regulatory role of ZAP in host mRNAs is largely unknown. Two major alternatively spliced ZAP isoforms, the constitutively expressed ZAPL and the infection-inducible ZAPS, play overlapping yet different antiviral and other roles that need further characterization. We found that the splicing factors hnRNPA1/A2, PTBP1/2, and U1-snRNP inhibit ZAPS production and demonstrated the feasibility to modulate the ZAPL/S balance by splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides in human cells. Transcriptomic analysis of ZAP-isoform-specific knockout cells revealed uncharacterized host mRNAs targeted by ZAPL/S with broad cellular functions such as unfolded protein response (UPR), epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and innate immunity. We established that endogenous ZAPL and ZAPS localize to membrane compartments and cytosol, respectively, and that the differential localization correlates with their target-RNA specificity. We showed that the ZAP isoforms regulated different UPR branches under resting and stress conditions and affected cell viability during ER stress. We also provided evidence for a different function of the ZAP isoforms in EMT-related cell migration, with effects that are cell-type dependent. Overall, this study demonstrates that the competition between splicing and IPA is a potential target for the modulation of the ZAPL/S balance, and reports new cellular transcripts and processes regulated by the ZAP isoforms.


Subject(s)
Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition , RNA, Messenger , RNA, Viral , RNA-Binding Proteins , Unfolded Protein Response , Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/genetics , Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1/metabolism , Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/genetics , Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins/metabolism , Humans , Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein/genetics , Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein/metabolism , Protein Isoforms/genetics , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Ribonucleoproteins, Small Nuclear/metabolism
2.
Molecules ; 27(14)2022 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917640

ABSTRACT

Different pathological conditions, including viral infections and cancer, can have a massive impact on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing severe damage to the cell and exacerbating the disease. In particular, coronavirus infections, including SARS coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for COVID-19, cause ER stress as a consequence of the enormous amounts of viral glycoproteins synthesized, the perturbation of ER homeostasis and the modification of ER membranes. Therefore, ER has a central role in the viral life cycle, thus representing one of the Achilles' heels on which to focus therapeutic intervention. On the other hand, prolonged ER stress has been demonstrated to promote many pro-tumoral attributes in cancer cells, having a key role in tumor growth, metastasis and response to therapies. In this report, adopting a repurposing approach of approved drugs, we identified the antiplatelet agent ticlopidine as an interferent of the unfolded protein response (UPR) via sigma receptors (SRs) modulation. The promising results obtained suggest the potential use of ticlopidine to counteract ER stress induced by viral infections, such as COVID-19, and cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Ticlopidine/pharmacology , Unfolded Protein Response
3.
Vet Microbiol ; 271: 109494, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1886124

ABSTRACT

Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) is an emerging enteropathogenic coronavirus that has the potential for cross-species infection. Many viruses have been reported to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and activate the unfolded protein response (UPR). To date, little is known about whether and, if so, how the UPR is activated by PDCoV infection. Here, we investigated the activation state of UPR pathways and their effects on viral replication during PDCoV infection. We found that PDCoV infection induced ERS and activated all three known UPR pathways (inositol-requiring enzyme 1 [IRE1], activating transcription factor 6 [ATF6], and PKR-like ER kinase [PERK]), as demonstrated by IRE1-mediated XBP1 mRNA cleavage and increased mRNA expression of XBP1s, ATF4, CHOP, GADD34, GRP78, and GRP94, as well as phosphorylated eIF2α expression. Through pharmacologic treatment, RNA interference, and overexpression experiments, we confirmed the negative role of the PERK-eIF2α pathway and the positive regulatory role of the ATF6 pathway, but found no obvious effect of IRE1 pathway, on PDCoV replication. Taken together, our results characterize, for the first time, the state of the ERS response during PDCoV infection and identify the PERK and ATF6 pathways as potential antiviral targets.


Subject(s)
Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases , Unfolded Protein Response , Animals , Deltacoronavirus , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2/metabolism , Protein Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Swine , eIF-2 Kinase/genetics , eIF-2 Kinase/metabolism
4.
J Virol ; 96(1): e0169521, 2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816694

ABSTRACT

The replication of coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and the recently emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is closely associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of infected cells. The unfolded protein response (UPR), which is mediated by ER stress (ERS), is a typical outcome in coronavirus-infected cells and is closely associated with the characteristics of coronaviruses. However, the interaction between virus-induced ERS and coronavirus replication is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that infection with the betacoronavirus porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV) induced ERS and triggered all three branches of the UPR signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, ERS suppressed PHEV replication in mouse neuro-2a (N2a) cells primarily by activating the protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK)-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) axis of the UPR. Moreover, another eIF2α phosphorylation kinase, interferon (IFN)-induced double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), was also activated and acted cooperatively with PERK to decrease PHEV replication. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the PERK/PKR-eIF2α pathways negatively regulated PHEV replication by attenuating global protein translation. Phosphorylated eIF2α also promoted the formation of stress granules (SGs), which in turn repressed PHEV replication. In summary, our study presents a vital aspect of the host innate response to invading pathogens and reveals attractive host targets (e.g., PERK, PKR, and eIF2α) for antiviral drugs. IMPORTANCE Coronavirus diseases are caused by different coronaviruses of importance in humans and animals, and specific treatments are extremely limited. ERS, which can activate the UPR to modulate viral replication and the host innate response, is a frequent occurrence in coronavirus-infected cells. PHEV, a neurotropic betacoronavirus, causes nerve cell damage, which accounts for the high mortality rates in suckling piglets. However, it remains incompletely understood whether the highly developed ER in nerve cells plays an antiviral role in ERS and how ERS regulates viral proliferation. In this study, we found that PHEV infection induced ERS and activated the UPR both in vitro and in vivo and that the activated PERK/PKR-eIF2α axis inhibited PHEV replication through attenuating global protein translation and promoting SG formation. A better understanding of coronavirus-induced ERS and UPR activation may reveal the pathogenic mechanism of coronavirus and facilitate the development of new treatment strategies for these diseases.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus 1/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology , eIF-2 Kinase/metabolism , Animals , Betacoronavirus 1/metabolism , Cell Line , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , Endoplasmic Reticulum/ultrastructure , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Mice , Phosphorylation , Protein Biosynthesis , Signal Transduction , Unfolded Protein Response
5.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(9)2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684242

ABSTRACT

Development of the messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine has emerged as an effective and speedy strategy to control the spread of new pathogens. After vaccination, the mRNA is translated into the real protein vaccine, and there is no need to manufacture the protein in vitro. However, the fate of mRNA and its posttranslational modification inside the cell may affect immune response. Here, we showed that the mRNA vaccine of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein with deletion of glycosites in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) or especially the subunit 2 (S2) domain to expose more conserved epitopes elicited stronger antibody and CD8+ T cell responses with broader protection against the alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and omicron variants, compared to the unmodified mRNA. Immunization of such mRNA resulted in accumulation of misfolded spike protein in the endoplasmic reticulum, causing the up-regulation of BiP/GRP78, XBP1, and p-eIF2α to induce cell apoptosis and strong CD8+ T cell response. In addition, dendritic cells (DCs) incubated with S2-glysosite deleted mRNA vaccine increased class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I) expression. This study provides a direction for the development of broad-spectrum mRNA vaccines which may not be achieved with the use of expressed proteins as antigens.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cytokines/metabolism , Glycosylation , HEK293 Cells , Histocompatibility Antigens/metabolism , Humans , Immunity , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Unfolded Protein Response , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , /immunology
6.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1352: 125-147, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669700

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The recent outbreak of coronavirus infection by SARS-CoV-2 that started from the Wuhan Province of China in 2019 has spread to most parts of the world infecting millions of people. Although the case fatality rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection is less than the previous epidemics by other closely related coronaviruses, due to its high infectivity, the total number of SARS-CoV-2 infection-associated disease, called Covid-19, is a matter of global concern. Despite drastic preventive measures, the number of Covid-19 cases are steadily increasing, and the future course of this pandemic is highly unpredictable. The most concerning fact about Covid-19 is the absence of specific and effective preventive or therapeutic agents against the disease. Finding an immediate intervention against Covid-19 is the need of the hour. In this chapter, we have discussed the role of different branches of the cellular proteostasis network, represented by Hsp70-Hsp40 chaperone system, Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS), autophagy, and endoplasmic reticulum-Unfolded Protein Response (ER-UPR) pathway in the pathogenesis of coronavirus infections and in the host antiviral defense mechanisms. RESULTS: Based on scientific literature, we present that pharmacological manipulation of proteostasis network can alter the fate of coronavirus infections and may help to prevent the resulting pathologies like Covid-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Proteostasis , SARS-CoV-2 , Unfolded Protein Response
7.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572656

ABSTRACT

In the past year and a half, SARS-CoV-2 has caused 240 million confirmed cases and 5 million deaths worldwide. Autophagy is a conserved process that either promotes or inhibits viral infections. Although coronaviruses are known to utilize the transport of autophagy-dependent vesicles for the viral life cycle, the underlying autophagy-inducing mechanisms remain largely unexplored. Using several autophagy-deficient cell lines and autophagy inhibitors, we demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 ORF3a was able to induce incomplete autophagy in a FIP200/Beclin-1-dependent manner. Moreover, ORF3a was involved in the induction of the UPR (unfolded protein response), while the IRE1 and ATF6 pathways, but not the PERK pathway, were responsible for mediating the ORF3a-induced autophagy. These results identify the role of the UPR pathway in the ORF3a-induced classical autophagy process, which may provide us with a better understanding of SARS-CoV-2 and suggest new therapeutic modalities in the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Autophagy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Unfolded Protein Response , Viroporin Proteins/metabolism , Animals , Autophagy/genetics , Autophagy-Related Proteins/genetics , Beclin-1/genetics , Cell Line , Humans , Signal Transduction
8.
mBio ; 12(4): e0157221, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349194

ABSTRACT

Tissue- and cell-specific expression patterns are highly variable within and across individuals, leading to altered host responses after acute virus infection. Unraveling key tissue-specific response patterns provides novel opportunities for defining fundamental mechanisms of virus-host interaction in disease and the identification of critical tissue-specific networks for disease intervention in the lung. Currently, there are no approved therapeutics for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) patients, and little is understood about how lung cell types contribute to disease outcomes. MERS-CoV replicates equivalently in primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells (MVE) and fibroblasts (FB) and to equivalent peak titers but with slower replication kinetics in human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE). However, only infected MVE demonstrate observable virus-induced cytopathic effect. To explore mechanisms leading to reduced MVE viability, donor-matched human lung MVE, HAE, and FB were infected, and their transcriptomes, proteomes, and lipidomes were monitored over time. Validated functional enrichment analysis demonstrated that MERS-CoV-infected MVE were dying via an unfolded protein response (UPR)-mediated apoptosis. Pharmacologic manipulation of the UPR in MERS-CoV-infected primary lung cells reduced viral titers and in male mice improved respiratory function with accompanying reductions in weight loss, pathological signatures of acute lung injury, and times to recovery. Systems biology analysis and validation studies of global kinetic transcript, protein, and lipid data sets confirmed that inhibition of host stress pathways that are differentially regulated following MERS-CoV infection of different tissue types can alleviate symptom progression to end-stage lung disease commonly seen following emerging coronavirus outbreaks. IMPORTANCE Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe atypical pneumonia in infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms of pathogenesis remain unknown. While much has been learned from the few reported autopsy cases, an in-depth understanding of the cells targeted by MERS-CoV in the human lung and their relative contribution to disease outcomes is needed. The host response in MERS-CoV-infected primary human lung microvascular endothelial (MVE) cells and fibroblasts (FB) was evaluated over time by analyzing total RNA, proteins, and lipids to determine the cellular pathways modulated postinfection. Findings revealed that MERS-CoV-infected MVE cells die via apoptotic mechanisms downstream of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Interruption of enzymatic processes within the UPR in MERS-CoV-infected male mice reduced disease symptoms, virus-induced lung injury, and time to recovery. These data suggest that the UPR plays an important role in MERS-CoV infection and may represent a host target for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Apoptosis/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Unfolded Protein Response/physiology , Acute Lung Injury/virology , Animals , Cell Line , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/virology , Female , Fibroblasts/metabolism , Fibroblasts/virology , Humans , Male , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology
9.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5536, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428813

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses (CoVs) are important human pathogens for which no specific treatment is available. Here, we provide evidence that pharmacological reprogramming of ER stress pathways can be exploited to suppress CoV replication. The ER stress inducer thapsigargin efficiently inhibits coronavirus (HCoV-229E, MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV-2) replication in different cell types including primary differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells, (partially) reverses the virus-induced translational shut-down, improves viability of infected cells and counteracts the CoV-mediated downregulation of IRE1α and the ER chaperone BiP. Proteome-wide analyses revealed specific pathways, protein networks and components that likely mediate the thapsigargin-induced antiviral state, including essential (HERPUD1) or novel (UBA6 and ZNF622) factors of ER quality control, and ER-associated protein degradation complexes. Additionally, thapsigargin blocks the CoV-induced selective autophagic flux involving p62/SQSTM1. The data show that thapsigargin hits several central mechanisms required for CoV replication, suggesting that this compound (or derivatives thereof) may be developed into broad-spectrum anti-CoV drugs.


Subject(s)
Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication/physiology , Animals , Autophagy/drug effects , Bronchi/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Differentiation/drug effects , Cell Extracts , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus 229E, Human/physiology , Down-Regulation/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Macrolides/pharmacology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Proteome/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Thapsigargin/pharmacology , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
10.
IUBMB Life ; 74(1): 93-100, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1353459

ABSTRACT

Unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are aspects of SARS-CoV-2-host cell interaction with proposed role in the cytopathic and inflammatory pathogenesis of this viral infection. The role of the NF-kB pathway in these cellular processes remains poorly characterized. When investigated in VERO-E6 cells, SARS-CoV-2 infection was found to markedly stimulate NF-kB protein expression and activity. NF-kB activation occurs early in the infection process (6 hpi) and it is associated with increased MAPK signaling and expression of the UPR inducer IRE-1α. These signal transduction processes characterize the cellular stress response to the virus promoting a pro-inflammatory environment and caspase activation in the host cell. Inhibition of viral replication by the viral protease inhibitor Nelfinavir reverts all these molecular changes also stimulating c-Jun expression, a key component of the JNK/AP-1 pathway with important role in the IRE-1α-mediated transcriptional regulation of stress response genes with anti-inflammatory and cytoprotection function. The present study demonstrates that UPR signaling and its interaction with cellular MAPKs and the NF-kB activity are important aspects of SARS-CoV-2-host cell interaction that deserve further investigation to identify more efficient therapies for this viral infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/drug effects , NF-kappa B/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Caspase 9/metabolism , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral/drug effects , Humans , MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects , Models, Biological , Nelfinavir/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects , Vero Cells
11.
Mol Cell Proteomics ; 20: 100120, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284342

ABSTRACT

Human coronaviruses have become an increasing threat to global health; three highly pathogenic strains have emerged since the early 2000s, including most recently SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of coronavirus pathogenesis is needed, including how these highly virulent strains differ from those that cause milder, common-cold-like disease. While significant progress has been made in understanding how SARS-CoV-2 proteins interact with the host cell, nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) has largely been omitted from the analyses. Nsp3 is a viral protease with important roles in viral protein biogenesis, replication complex formation, and modulation of host ubiquitinylation and ISGylation. Herein, we use affinity purification-mass spectrometry to study the host-viral protein-protein interactome of nsp3 from five coronavirus strains: pathogenic strains SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV; and endemic common-cold strains hCoV-229E and hCoV-OC43. We divide each nsp3 into three fragments and use tandem mass tag technology to directly compare the interactors across the five strains for each fragment. We find that few interactors are common across all variants for a particular fragment, but we identify shared patterns between select variants, such as ribosomal proteins enriched in the N-terminal fragment (nsp3.1) data set for SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV. We also identify unique biological processes enriched for individual homologs, for instance, nuclear protein import for the middle fragment of hCoV-229E, as well as ribosome biogenesis of the MERS nsp3.2 homolog. Lastly, we further investigate the interaction of the SARS-CoV-2 nsp3 N-terminal fragment with ATF6, a regulator of the unfolded protein response. We show that SARS-CoV-2 nsp3.1 directly binds to ATF6 and can suppress the ATF6 stress response. Characterizing the host interactions of nsp3 widens our understanding of how coronaviruses co-opt cellular pathways and presents new avenues for host-targeted antiviral therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Activating Transcription Factor 6/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Coronavirus 229E, Human/metabolism , Coronavirus 229E, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus OC43, Human/metabolism , Coronavirus OC43, Human/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/metabolism , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Protein Interaction Maps , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Unfolded Protein Response , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism
12.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(6): e1009644, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278205

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infection induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular signalling pathway composed of three branches, triggered by unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) due to high ER load. We have used RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling to investigate holistically the transcriptional and translational response to cellular infection by murine hepatitis virus (MHV), often used as a model for the Betacoronavirus genus to which the recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 also belongs. We found the UPR to be amongst the most significantly up-regulated pathways in response to MHV infection. To confirm and extend these observations, we show experimentally the induction of all three branches of the UPR in both MHV- and SARS-CoV-2-infected cells. Over-expression of the SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 or S proteins alone is itself sufficient to induce the UPR. Remarkably, pharmacological inhibition of the UPR greatly reduced the replication of both MHV and SARS-CoV-2, revealing the importance of this pathway for successful coronavirus replication. This was particularly striking when both IRE1α and ATF6 branches of the UPR were inhibited, reducing SARS-CoV-2 virion release (~1,000-fold). Together, these data highlight the UPR as a promising antiviral target to combat coronavirus infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects , Activating Transcription Factor 6/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Delivery Systems , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , RNA-Seq , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259507

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is caused by the 2019-nCoV/SARS-CoV-2 virus. This severe acute respiratory syndrome is currently a global health emergency and needs much effort to generate an urgent practical treatment to reduce COVID-19 complications and mortality in humans. Viral infection activates various cellular responses in infected cells, including cellular stress responses such as unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy, following the inhibition of mTOR. Both UPR and autophagy mechanisms are involved in cellular and tissue homeostasis, apoptosis, innate immunity modulation, and clearance of pathogens such as viral particles. However, during an evolutionary arms race, viruses gain the ability to subvert autophagy and UPR for their benefit. SARS-CoV-2 can enter host cells through binding to cell surface receptors, including angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and neuropilin-1 (NRP1). ACE2 blockage increases autophagy through mTOR inhibition, leading to gastrointestinal complications during SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. NRP1 is also regulated by the mTOR pathway. An increased NRP1 can enhance the susceptibility of immune system dendritic cells (DCs) to SARS-CoV-2 and induce cytokine storm, which is related to high COVID-19 mortality. Therefore, signaling pathways such as mTOR, UPR, and autophagy may be potential therapeutic targets for COVID-19. Hence, extensive investigations are required to confirm these potentials. Since there is currently no specific treatment for COVID-19 infection, we sought to review and discuss the important roles of autophagy, UPR, and mTOR mechanisms in the regulation of cellular responses to coronavirus infection to help identify new antiviral modalities against SARS-CoV-2 virus.


Subject(s)
Autophagy , COVID-19/pathology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Unfolded Protein Response , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Autophagy/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Molecular Chaperones/chemistry , Molecular Chaperones/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Viral Envelope Proteins/metabolism
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244042

ABSTRACT

Infection induces the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-6. Although they facilitate local antiviral immunity, their excessive release leads to life-threatening cytokine release syndrome, exemplified by the severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. In this study, we investigated the roles of the integrated stress response (ISR) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) family proteins in regulating coronavirus-induced IL-8 and IL-6 upregulation. The mRNA expression of IL-8 and IL-6 was significantly induced in cells infected with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a gammacoronavirus, and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, an alphacoronavirus. Overexpression of a constitutively active phosphomimetic mutant of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), chemical inhibition of its dephosphorylation, or overexpression of its upstream double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) significantly enhanced IL-8 mRNA expression in IBV-infected cells. Overexpression of the AP-1 protein cJUN or its upstream kinase also increased the IBV-induced IL-8 mRNA expression, which was synergistically enhanced by overexpression of cFOS. Taken together, this study demonstrated the important regulatory roles of ISR and AP-1 proteins in IL-8 production during coronavirus infection, highlighting the complex interactions between cellular stress pathways and the innate immune response.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/genetics , Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-2/metabolism , Interleukin-8/metabolism , Unfolded Protein Response/genetics , Alphacoronavirus/metabolism , Alphacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Gammacoronavirus/metabolism , Gammacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Infectious bronchitis virus/metabolism , Infectious bronchitis virus/pathogenicity , Interleukin-8/genetics , Phosphorylation , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/metabolism , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/pathogenicity , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos/metabolism , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun/genetics , Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-jun/metabolism , Signal Transduction/genetics , Transcription Factor AP-1/genetics , Transcription Factor AP-1/metabolism , Up-Regulation , Vero Cells , eIF-2 Kinase/genetics , eIF-2 Kinase/metabolism
15.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 668034, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231324

ABSTRACT

The ability to sense and adequately respond to variable environmental conditions is central for cellular and organismal homeostasis. Eukaryotic cells are equipped with highly conserved stress-response mechanisms that support cellular function when homeostasis is compromised, promoting survival. Two such mechanisms - the unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy - are involved in the cellular response to perturbations in the endoplasmic reticulum, in calcium homeostasis, in cellular energy or redox status. Each of them operates through conserved signaling pathways to promote cellular adaptations that include re-programming transcription of genes and translation of new proteins and degradation of cellular components. In addition to their specific functions, it is becoming increasingly clear that these pathways intersect in many ways in different contexts of cellular stress. Viral infections are a major cause of cellular stress as many cellular functions are coopted to support viral replication. Both UPR and autophagy are induced upon infection with many different viruses with varying outcomes - in some instances controlling infection while in others supporting viral replication and infection. The role of UPR and autophagy in response to coronavirus infection has been a matter of debate in the last decade. It has been suggested that CoV exploit components of autophagy machinery and UPR to generate double-membrane vesicles where it establishes its replicative niche and to control the balance between cell death and survival during infection. Even though the molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated, it is clear that UPR and autophagy are intimately associated during CoV infections. The current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has brought renewed interest to this topic as several drugs known to modulate autophagy - including chloroquine, niclosamide, valinomycin, and spermine - were proposed as therapeutic options. Their efficacy is still debatable, highlighting the need to better understand the molecular interactions between CoV, UPR and autophagy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Autophagy , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Unfolded Protein Response
16.
IUBMB Life ; 73(6): 843-854, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219298

ABSTRACT

The 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident molecular chaperone. GRP78 is a member of the 70 kDa heat shock family of proteins involved in correcting and clearing misfolded proteins in the ER. In response to cellular stress, GRP78 escapes from the ER and moves to the plasma membrane where it (a) functions as a receptor for many ligands, and (b) behaves as an autoantigen for autoantibodies that contribute to human disease and cancer. Cell surface GRP78 (csGRP78) associates with the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), and is the port of entry for several viruses, including the predictive binding of the novel SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, csGRP78 is found in association with partners as diverse as the teratocarcinoma-derived growth factor 1 (Cripto), the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) and the DnaJ-like protein MTJ-1. CsGRP78 also serves as a receptor for a large variety of ligands including activated α2 -macroglobulin (α2 M*), plasminogen kringle 5 (K5), microplasminogen, the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), tissue factor (TF), and the prostate apoptosis response-4 protein (Par-4). In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the translocation of GRP78 from the ER to the cell surface, and the role of secreted GRP78 and its autoantibodies in cancer and neurological disorders.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , Heat-Shock Proteins/physiology , Neoplasm Proteins/physiology , Nerve Tissue Proteins/physiology , Receptors, Cell Surface/physiology , Receptors, Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoantigens/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/metabolism , Cell Survival , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/physiology , Exosomes , GPI-Linked Proteins/metabolism , Heat-Shock Proteins/chemistry , Heat-Shock Proteins/immunology , Humans , Ligands , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Nerve Tissue Proteins/immunology , Protein Domains , Protein Transport , Signal Transduction , Tumor Microenvironment , Unfolded Protein Response/physiology , Virus Internalization
17.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100759, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219049

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of the COVID-19 global pandemic, utilizes the host receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) for viral entry. However, other host factors might also play important roles in SARS-CoV-2 infection, providing new directions for antiviral treatments. GRP78 is a stress-inducible chaperone important for entry and infectivity for many viruses. Recent molecular docking analyses revealed putative interaction between GRP78 and the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein (SARS-2-S). Here we report that GRP78 can form a complex with SARS-2-S and ACE2 on the surface and at the perinuclear region typical of the endoplasmic reticulum in VeroE6-ACE2 cells and that the substrate-binding domain of GRP78 is critical for this interaction. In vitro binding studies further confirmed that GRP78 can directly bind to the RBD of SARS-2-S and ACE2. To investigate the role of GRP78 in this complex, we knocked down GRP78 in VeroE6-ACE2 cells. Loss of GRP78 markedly reduced cell surface ACE2 expression and led to activation of markers of the unfolded protein response. Treatment of lung epithelial cells with a humanized monoclonal antibody (hMAb159) selected for its safe clinical profile in preclinical models depleted cell surface GRP78 and reduced cell surface ACE2 expression, as well as SARS-2-S-driven viral entry and SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro. Our data suggest that GRP78 is an important host auxiliary factor for SARS-CoV-2 entry and infection and a potential target to combat this novel pathogen and other viruses that utilize GRP78 in combination therapy.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Binding Sites , Chlorocebus aethiops , Endoplasmic Reticulum/drug effects , Endoplasmic Reticulum/metabolism , Endoplasmic Reticulum/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Heat-Shock Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Heat-Shock Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Mutation , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Protein Multimerization , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Unfolded Protein Response , Vero Cells
18.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 04 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194614

ABSTRACT

Emerging data suggest that obesity is a major risk factor for the progression of major complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), cytokine storm and coagulopathy in COVID-19. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the link between obesity and disease severity as a result of SARS-CoV-2 infection is crucial for the development of new therapeutic interventions and preventive measures in this high-risk group. We propose that multiple features of obesity contribute to the prevalence of severe COVID-19 and complications. First, viral entry can be facilitated by the upregulation of viral entry receptors, like angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), among others. Second, obesity-induced chronic inflammation and disruptions of insulin and leptin signaling can result in impaired viral clearance and a disproportionate or hyper-inflammatory response, which together with elevated ferritin levels can be a direct cause for ARDS and cytokine storm. Third, the negative consequences of obesity on blood coagulation can contribute to the progression of thrombus formation and hemorrhage. In this review we first summarize clinical findings on the relationship between obesity and COVID-19 disease severity and then further discuss potential mechanisms that could explain the risk for major complications in patients suffering from obesity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Obesity/complications , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Chronic Disease , Humans , Immunity , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Insulin Resistance , Obesity/immunology , Obesity/pathology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Unfolded Protein Response , Virus Internalization
19.
Virus Res ; 296: 198350, 2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091608

ABSTRACT

The open reading frame 8 (orf8) is an accessory protein of SARS-CoV-2. It has 121 amino acids with two genotypes, orf8L and orf8S. In this study, we overexpressed the orf8L and orf8S of SARS-CoV-2 as well as the orf8b of SARS-CoV to investigate their roles in the regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the inhibition of interferon beta (IFNß) production. We found that the two genotypes of SARS-CoV-2 orf8 are capable of inducing ER stress without significant difference by triggering the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and inositol-requiring enzymes 1 (IRE1) branches of the ER stress pathway. However, the third branch of ER stress pathway, i.e. the protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK), was unaffected by the overexpression of SARS-CoV-2 orf8L or orf8S. Moreover, both orf8L and orf8S of SARS-CoV-2 are capable of down regulating the production of IFNß and interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), ISG15 and ISG56 induced by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly (I:C)). Moreover, we also found decreased nuclear translocation of Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), after overexpressing orf8L and orf8S induced by poly (I:C). Our data demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 orf8 protein could induce ER stress by activating the ATF6 and IRE1 pathways, but not the PERK pathway, and functions as an interferon antagonist to inhibit the production of IFNß. However, these functions appeared not to be affected by the genotypes of SARS-CoV-2 orf8L and orf8S.


Subject(s)
Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress/physiology , Immune Evasion , Interferon-beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Proteins/physiology , Activating Transcription Factor 6/physiology , Endoribonucleases/physiology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon-beta/biosynthesis , Sequence Alignment , Signal Transduction/physiology , Unfolded Protein Response , Viral Proteins/chemistry , X-Box Binding Protein 1/physiology , eIF-2 Kinase/physiology
20.
Brief Funct Genomics ; 20(1): 28-41, 2021 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045889

ABSTRACT

The human genome has an almost equal distribution of unique and transposable genetic elements. Although at the transcriptome level, a relatively higher contribution from transposable elements derived RNA has been reported. This is further highlighted with evidence from pervasive transcription. Of the total RNA, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are significant contributors to the transcriptome pool with sizeable fraction from repetitive elements of the human genome, inclusive of Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs) and Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs). ncRNAs are increasingly being implicated in diverse functional roles especially during conditions of stress. These stress responses are driven through diverse mediators, inclusive of long and short ncRNAs. ncRNAs such as MALAT1, GAS5, miR-204 and miR-199a-5p have been functionally involved during oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Also, within SINEs, Alu RNAs derived from primate-specific Alu repeats with ~11% human genome contribution, playing a significant role. Pathogenic diseases, including the recent COVID-19, leads to differential regulation of ncRNAs. Although, limited evidence suggests the need for an inquest into the role of ncRNAs in determining the host response towards pathogen challenge.


Subject(s)
Infections/genetics , RNA, Untranslated/physiology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/physiology , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Infections/metabolism , Long Interspersed Nucleotide Elements , Oxidative Stress , RNA, Untranslated/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements , Unfolded Protein Response
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL