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1.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 773141, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775642

ABSTRACT

Background: Dubai (United Arab Emirates; UAE) has a multi-national population which makes it exceptionally interesting study sample because of its unique demographic factors. Objective: To stratify the risk factors for the multinational society of the UAE. Methods: A retrospective chart review of 560 patients sequentially admitted to inpatient care with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 was conducted. We studied patients' demographics, clinical features, laboratory results, disease severity, and outcomes. The parameters were compared across different ethnic groups using tree-based estimators to rank the ethnicity-specific disease features. We trained ML classification algorithms to build a model of ethnic specificity of COVID-19 based on clinical presentation and laboratory findings on admission. Results: Out of 560 patients, 43.6% were South Asians, 26.4% Middle Easterns, 16.8% East Asians, 10.7% Caucasians, and 2.5% are under others. UAE nationals represented half of the Middle Eastern patients, and 13% of the entire cohort. Hypertension was the most common comorbidity in COVID-19 patients. Subjective complaint of fever and cough were the chief presenting symptoms. Two-thirds of the patients had either a mild disease or were asymptomatic. Only 20% of the entire cohort needed oxygen therapy, and 12% needed ICU admission. Forty patients (~7%) needed invasive ventilation and fifteen patients died (2.7%). We observed differences in disease severity among different ethnic groups. Caucasian or East-Asian COVID-19 patients tended to have a more severe disease despite a lower risk profile. In contrast to this, Middle Eastern COVID-19 patients had a higher risk factor profile, but they did not differ markedly in disease severity from the other ethnic groups. There was no noticeable difference between the Middle Eastern subethnicities-Arabs and Africans-in disease severity (p = 0.81). However, there were disparities in the SOFA score, D-dimer (p = 0.015), fibrinogen (p = 0.007), and background diseases (hypertension, p = 0.003; diabetes and smoking, p = 0.045) between the subethnicities. Conclusion: We observed variations in disease severity among different ethnic groups. The high accuracy (average AUC = 0.9586) of the ethnicity classification model based on the laboratory and clinical findings suggests the presence of ethnic-specific disease features. Larger studies are needed to explore the role of ethnicity in COVID-19 disease features.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Arabs , Humans , Retrospective Studies , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 658, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whilst the impact of Covid-19 infection in pregnant women has been examined, there is a scarcity of data on pregnant women in the Middle East. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of Covid-19 infection on pregnant women in the United Arab Emirates population. METHODS: A case-control study was carried out to compare the clinical course and outcome of pregnancy in 79 pregnant women with Covid-19 and 85 non-pregnant women with Covid-19 admitted to Latifa Hospital in Dubai between March and June 2020. RESULTS: Although Pregnant women presented with fewer symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, and shortness of breath compared to non-pregnant women; yet they ran a much more severe course of illness. On admission, 12/79 (15.2%) Vs 2/85 (2.4%) had a chest radiograph score [on a scale 1-6] of ≥3 (p-value = 0.0039). On discharge, 6/79 (7.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) had a score ≥3 (p-value = 0.0438). They also had much higher levels of laboratory indicators of severity with values above reference ranges for C-Reactive Protein [(28 (38.3%) Vs 13 (17.6%)] with p < 0.004; and for D-dimer [32 (50.8%) Vs 3(6%)]; with p < 0.001. They required more ICU admissions: 10/79 (12.6%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0036; and suffered more complications: 9/79 (11.4%) Vs 1/85 (1.2%) with p=0.0066; of Covid-19 infection, particularly in late pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnant women presented with fewer Covid-19 symptoms but ran a much more severe course of illness compared to non-pregnant women with the disease. They had worse chest radiograph scores and much higher levels of laboratory indicators of disease severity. They had more ICU admissions and suffered more complications of Covid-19 infection, such as risk for miscarriage and preterm deliveries. Pregnancy with Covid-19 infection, could, therefore, be categorised as high-risk pregnancy and requires management by an obstetric and medical multidisciplinary team.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Premature Birth , Radiography, Thoracic , Symptom Assessment , Abortion, Spontaneous/epidemiology , Abortion, Spontaneous/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Case-Control Studies , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Male , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Premature Birth/etiology , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Radiography, Thoracic/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 136, 2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was first reported in December 2019. The severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) ranges from asymptomatic to severe and potentially fatal. We aimed to describe the clinical and laboratory features and outcomes of hospitalised patients with COVID-19 within the Abu Dhabi Healthcare Services Facilities (SEHA). METHODS: Our retrospective analysis of patient data collected from electronic health records (EHRs) available from the SEHA health information system included all patients admitted from 1 March to 31 May 2020 with a laboratory-confirmed PCR diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Data of clinical features, co-morbidities, laboratory markers, length of hospital stay, treatment received and mortality were analysed according to severe versus non-severe disease. RESULTS: The study included 9390 patients. Patients were divided into severe and non-severe groups. Seven hundred twenty-one (7.68%) patients required intensive care, whereas the remaining patients (92.32%) had mild or moderate disease. The mean patient age of our cohort (41.8 years) was lower than the global average. Our population had male predominance, and it included various nationalities. The major co-morbidities were hypertension, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. Laboratory tests revealed significant differences in lactate dehydrogenase, ferritin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and creatinine levels and the neutrophil count between the severe and non-severe groups. The most common anti-viral therapy was the combination of Hydroxychloroquine and Favipiravir. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 1.63%, although the rate was 19.56% in the severe group. The mortality rate was higher in adults younger than 30 years than in those older than 60 years (2.3% vs. 0.95%). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis suggested that Abu Dhabi had lower COVID-19 morbidity and mortalities rates were less than the reported rates then in China, Italy and the US. The affected population was relatively young, and it had an international representation. Globally, Abu Dhabi had one of the highest testing rates in relation to the population volume. We believe the early identification of patients and their younger age resulted in more favourable outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Laboratories , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
4.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 24(2)2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732344

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the prevalence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic among the general population of the United Arab Emirates.Methods: An online survey of a convenience sample was conducted between October 2020 and January 2021. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) was used to assess symptoms of OCD. The rate of OCD symptoms in those who had positive COVID-19 test results was compared with those who had no previous COVID-19 diagnosis.Results: The total number of participants was 702, including 371 males and 325 females (6 skipped the question regarding sex). Most participants reported no previous psychiatric history (84.3%). Previous psychiatric diagnoses were reported by 15.7% of participants (n = 110) and included generalized anxiety (27.3%), phobia (1.8%), depression (19.1%), bipolar mood disorder (1.8%), OCD (6.3%), and panic attacks (8.2%). There were 39 (5.6%) participants who had past psychiatric history but were unsure of the exact diagnosis. Presence of history of OCD for the total sample was reported by 7 (1%) participants. A family history of OCD was reported by 34 (4.8%) participants. A total of 218 (31.1%) participants scored mild, moderate, severe, or extreme OCD symptoms. Clinically significant OCD symptoms were reported by 75 participants (10.7% of the total sample). The mean (SD) score of the Y-BOCS was 6.63 (7.13) for the COVID-positive group and 4.9 (6.34) for the COVID-negative group, which was statistically significant (P = .0008).Conclusions: The study findings indicate an increased prevalence of OCD during the COVID-19 pandemic, which is significantly higher among people with positive COVID-19 infection compared to those with negative COVID-19 test results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
5.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0263034, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731595

ABSTRACT

Employee welfare represents a critical element of success for companies to remain competitive. Human resources increasingly encompass the management of critical situations that affect the employees' wellbeing. This research analyzes the effect of Human Resource Development (HRD), functions on the effectiveness of crisis management. It is an attempt to include HRD in the theory of Crisis management. Using Structural Equation Models-Partial Least Squares (SEM-PLS) analysis, the study analyzes how training, leadership, organizational strategy, and organizational culture directly positively impact the efficiency of Crisis management (CM) during the Covid-19 crisis in the public entities of Dubai-UAE. In particular, training showed to be the best predictor, followed by the Organizational culture. Organizational structure, Values and uniqueness show no impact on CM within the context of public entities of Dubai-UAE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Crew Resource Management, Healthcare , Workforce , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Leadership , Organizational Culture , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
6.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264682, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724857

ABSTRACT

Global and local whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 enables the tracing of domestic and international transmissions. We sequenced Viral RNA from 37 sampled Covid-19 patients with RT-PCR-confirmed infections across the UAE and developed time-resolved phylogenies with 69 local and 3,894 global genome sequences. Furthermore, we investigated specific clades associated with the UAE cohort and, their global diversity, introduction events and inferred domestic and international virus transmissions between January and June 2020. The study comprehensively characterized the genomic aspects of the virus and its spread within the UAE and identified that the prevalence shift of the D614G mutation was due to the later introductions of the G-variant associated with international travel, rather than higher local transmissibility. For clades spanning different emirates, the most recent common ancestors pre-date domestic travel bans. In conclusion, we observe a steep and sustained decline of international transmissions immediately following the introduction of international travel restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Infection Control/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Travel/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Molecular Typing/methods , Mutation , Phylogeny , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Travel-Related Illness , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
7.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264547, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724855

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The relationship between COVID-19 patient's clinical characteristics and disease manifestation remains incompletely understood. The impact of ethnicity on mortality of patients with COVID-19 infection is poorly addressed in the literature. Emerging evidence suggests that many risk factors are related to symptoms severity and mortality risk, emphasizing the necessity of fulfilling this knowledge gap that may help reducing mortality from COVID-19 infections through tackling the risk factors. AIMS: To explore epidemiological and demographic characteristics of hospitalized COVID-19 patients from different ethnic origins living in the UAE, compare them to findings reported across the globe and determine the impact of these characteristics and ethnicity on mortality during hospitalization. METHODS: A single center, retrospective chart review study of hospitalized COVID-19 patients was conducted in a large COVID-19 referral hospital in UAE. The following outcomes were assessed: patients' clinical characteristics, disease symptoms and severity, and association of ethnicity and other risk factors on 30-day in hospital mortality. RESULTS: A total of 3296 patients were recruited in this study with an average age of 44.3±13.4 years old. Preliminary data analysis indicated that 78.3% (n = 2582) of cases were considered mild. Average duration of hospital stay was 6.0±7.3 days and 4.3% (n = 143) were admitted to ICU. The most frequently reported symptoms were cough (32.6%, n = 1075) and fever (22.2%, n = 731). The 30-day mortality rate during hospitalization was 2.7% (n = 90). Many risk factors were associated with mortality during hospitalization including: age, respiratory rate (RR), creatinine, and C-reactive protein, oxygen saturation (SaO2), hemoglobin, hematocrit, ferritin, creatinine, C-reactive protein, anemia, COPD, Chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia, Vitamin-D Deficiency, and ethnic origin (p <0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that higher mortality rates during hospitalization was associated with anemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease, and Middle Eastern origin (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: The results indicated that most COVID-19 cases were mild and morality rate was low compared to worldwide reported mortality. Mortality rate during hospitalization was higher in patients from Middle East origin with preexisting comorbidities especially anemia, COPD, and chronic kidney disease. Due to the relatively small number of mortality cases, other identified risk factors from univariate analysis such as age, respiratory rate, and Vitamin-D (VitD) deficiency should also be taken into consideration. It is crucial to stratify patients on admission based on these risk factors to help decide intensity and type of treatment which, possibly, will reduce the risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
8.
BMC Psychol ; 10(1): 47, 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724573

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid shift to online education due to COVID-19 quarantine challenged students' ability to accept pure online learning without negative consequences for their physical, emotional and mental health. Some educational institutions introduced new strategies to reduce the psychosocial burden associated with online learning during home confinement. Thus, the primary aims were to determine the consequences of COVID-19 for the psychological well-being and fatigue levels of higher education students and to explore the effects of a new academic assessment approach in reducing home confinement stress. METHOD: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among students, from 30 August to 30 September 2020, of 7 disciplines in all 16 higher colleges of technology in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The Mental Well-being and Learning Behaviours Scale and the modified Copenhagen Burnout Inventory were used to evaluate students' psychological well-being and fatigue levels. A Welch t-test and Welch ANOVA were performed to determine the differences in perceived psychological well-being associated with students' characteristics. Second, Kruskal_Wallis and Mann_Whitney were performed to determine the differences in fatigue level based on students' characteristics. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred students participated. The majority were female (78.5%) and aged from 21-25 years (58.1%). Around 14% of respondents were married with children. Nearly 40% were satisfied with the new assessment approach introduced during the COVID pandemic and 45.5% perceived it as having reduced their home confinement stress. The mean psychological distress score of 3.00 (SD ± 0.71) indicates a moderate impact of COVID-19 on psychological well-being. Students' psychological distress was positively correlated with fatigue level (0.256, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with the perceived impact of the new assessment approach on student lifestyle (- 0.133, p < 0.001), physical health (- 0.149, p < 0.001) and coping with stress (- 0.125, p < 0.001). Male students experienced significantly lower fatigue and better psychological well-being than female students. CONCLUSION: The study reveals that new assessment approaches which emerged during home confinement reduced students' perception of stress and of impaired lifestyle. However, students still had a considerable burden of psychological distress, requiring further preventive measures to maintain their psychological well-being during future outbreak events. Educational institutions should consider additional strategies to improve students' preparedness for online teaching, which could help maintain their psychological well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Universities , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264436, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700564

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine is a rapidly expanding field of medicine and an alternative method for delivering quality medical care to patients' fingertips. With the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an increase in the use of telemedicine to connect patients and healthcare providers, which has been made possible by mobile health (mHealth) applications. The goal of this study was to compare the satisfaction of patients with telemedicine among mHealth users and non-users. This was a survey-based study that included outpatients from Abu Dhabi. The association between patient satisfaction with telemedicine and use of mHealth technologies was described using regression models. This study included a total of 515 completed responses. The use of mHealth application was significantly associated with ease of booking telemedicine appointments (OR 2.61, 95% CI 1.63-4.18; P < .001), perception of similarity of quality of care between telemedicine consultations and in-person visits (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.26-2.61; P = .001), and preference for using telemedicine applications over in-person visits during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.12-2.72; P = .015). Our study results support that the use of mHealth applications is associated with increased patient satisfaction with telemedicine appointments.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications/trends , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomedical Technology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
10.
Vaccine ; 40(13): 2003-2010, 2022 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This is a community-based, retrospective, observational study conducted to determine effectiveness of the BBIBP-CorV inactivated vaccine in the real-world setting against hospital admissions and death. STUDY DESIGN: Study participants were selected from 214,940 PCR-positive cases of COVID-19 reported to the Department of Health, Abu Dhabi Emirate, United Arab Emirates (UAE) between September 01, 2020 and May 1, 2021. Of these, 176,640 individuals were included in the study who were aged ≥ 15 years with confirmed COVID-19 positive status who had records linked to their vaccination status. Those with incomplete or missing records were excluded (n = 38,300). Study participants were divided into three groups depending upon their vaccination status: fully vaccinated (two doses), partially vaccinated (single dose), and non-vaccinated. Study outcomes included COVID-19-related admissions to hospital general and critical care wards and death. Vaccine effectiveness for each outcome was based on the incidence density per 1000 person-years. RESULTS: The fully-, partially- and non-vaccinated groups included 62,931, 21,768 and 91,941 individuals, respectively. Based on the incidence rate ratios, the vaccine effectiveness in fully vaccinated individuals was 80%, 92%, and 97% in preventing COVID-19-related hospital admissions, critical care admissions, and death, respectively, when compared to the non-vaccinated group. No protection was observed for critical and non-critical care hospital admissions for the partially vaccinated group, while some protection against death was apparent, although statistically insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: In a COVID-19 pandemic, use of the Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV inactivated vaccine is effective in preventing severe disease and death in a two-dose regimen. Lack of protection with the single dose may be explained by insufficient seroconversion and/or neutralizing antibody responses, behavioral factors (i.e., false sense of protection), and/or other biological factors (emergence of variants, possibility of reinfection, duration of vaccine protection, etc.).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Vaccines, Inactivated
11.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 490, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621267

ABSTRACT

Based on the findings from the Phase III clinical trials of inactivated SARS COV-2 Vaccine, (BBIBP-CORV) emergency use authorization (EUA) was granted for the vaccine to frontline workers in the UAE. A prospective cohort study was conducted among frontline workers to estimate the incidence rate and risk of symptomatic COVID-19 infection 14 days after the second dose of inoculation with BBIBP-CORV inactivated vaccine. Those who received two doses of the BBIBP-CORV vaccine in the period from 14th of September 2020 (first dose) to 21st of December 2020 (second dose) were followed up for COVID-19 infections. 11,322 individuals who received the two-dose BBIBP-CORV vaccine were included and were followed up post the second dose plus fourteen days. The incidence rate of symptomatic infection was 0.08 per 1000-person days (95% CI 0.07, 0.10). The estimated absolute risk of developing symptomatic infection was 0.97% (95% CI 0.77%, 1.17%). The confirmed seroconversion rate was 92.8%. There were no serious adverse events reported and no individuals suffered from severe disease. Our findings show that vaccinated individuals are likely to remain protected against symptomatic infection or becoming PCR positive for SARS COV 2 following the second dose of the vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Headache/etiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects
12.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 632965, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575687

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 is raising with a second wave threatening many countries. Therefore, it is important to understand COVID-19 characteristics across different countries. Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 525 hospitalized symptomatic COVID-19 patients, from the central federal hospital in Dubai-UAE during period of March to August 2020. Results: UAE's COVID-19 patients were relatively young; mean (SD) of the age 49(15) years, 130 (25%) were older than 60 and 4 (<1%) were younger than 18 years old. Majority were male(47; 78%). The mean (SD) BMI was 29 (6) kg/m2. While the source of contracting COVID-19 was not known in 369 (70%) of patients, 29 (6%) reported travel to overseas-country and 127 (24%) reported contact with another COVID-19 case/s. At least one comorbidity was present in 284 (54%) of patients and 241 (46%) had none. The most common comorbidities were diabetes (177; 34%) and hypertension (166; 32%). The mean (SD) of symptoms duration was 6 (3) days. The most common symptoms at hospitalization were fever (340; 65%), cough (296; 56%), and shortness of breath (SOB) (243; 46%). Most of the laboratory values were within normal range, but (184; 35%) of patients had lymphopenia, 43 (8%) had neutrophilia, and 116 (22%) had prolong international normalized ratio (INR), and 317 (60%) had high D-dimer. Chest x ray findings of consolidation was present in 334 (64%) of patients and CT scan ground glass appearance was present in 354 (68%). Acute cardiac injury occurred in 124 (24%), acute kidney injury in 111 (21%), liver injury in 101 (19%), ARDS in 155 (30%), acidosis in 118 (22%), and septic shock in 93 (18%). Consequently, 150 (29%) required ICU admission with 103 (20%) needed mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: The study demonstrated the special profile of COVID-19 in UAE. Patients were young with diabetes and/or hypertension and associated with severe infection as shown by various clinical and laboratory data necessitating ICU admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Young Adult
13.
J Int Med Res ; 49(11): 3000605211056834, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546700

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of a prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and its association with in-patient mortality. METHODS: A cohort of 745 patients were recruited from a single center between 1 March 2020 and 31 May 2020. We analyzed the factors associated with a prolonged QTc and mortality. RESULTS: A prolonged QTc interval >450 ms was found in 27% of patients admitted with SARS-CoV-2 infection. These patients were predominantly older, on a ventilator, and had hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or ischemic heart disease. They also had high troponin and D-dimer concentrations. A prolonged QTc interval had a significant association with the requirement of ventilator support and was associated with an increased odds of mortality. Patients who died were older than 55 years, and had high troponin, D-dimer, creatinine, procalcitonin, and ferritin concentrations, a high white blood cell count, and abnormal potassium concentrations (hypo- or hyperkalemia). CONCLUSIONS: A prolonged QTc interval is common in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and it is associated with worse outcomes. Older individuals and those with comorbidities should have an electrocardiogram performed, which is noninvasive and easily available, on admission to hospital to identify high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Long QT Syndrome , Electrocardiography , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
14.
Int J Public Health ; 66: 1604369, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542390

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Providing medical care during a global pandemic exposes healthcare workers (HCW) to a high level of risk, causing anxiety and stress. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and psychological distress among HCWs during COVID-19. Methods: We invited HCWs from 3 hospitals across the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to participate in an anonymous online survey between April 19-May 3, 2020. The GAD-7 and K10 measures were used to assess anxiety and psychological distress. Logistic regression models assessed associations between knowledge, attitude, worry, and levels of anxiety and psychological distress. Results: A total of 481 HCWs participated in this study. The majority of HCWs were female (73.6%) and aged 25-34 years (52.6%). More than half were nurses (55.7%) and had good knowledge of COVID-19 (86.3%). Over a third (37%) of HCWs reported moderate/severe psychological distress in the K10 measure and moderate/severe anxiety (32.3%) in the GAD-7, with frontline workers significantly reporting higher levels of anxiety (36%). Knowledge of COVID-19 did not predict anxiety and psychological distress, however, HCWs who believed COVID-19 was difficult to treat and those who perceived they were at high risk of infection had worse mental health outcomes. Worry about spreading COVID-19 to family, being isolated, contracting COVID-19 and feeling stigmatized had 1.8- to 2.5-fold increased odds of symptoms of mental health problems. Additionally, HCWs who felt the need for psychological support through their workplace showed increased odds of psychological distress. Conclusion: HCWs in the UAE reported a high prevalence of psychological distress and anxiety while responding to the challenges of COVID-19. The findings from this study emphasize the public, emotional and mental health burden of COVID-19 and highlight the importance for health systems to implement, monitor, and update preventive policies to protect HCWs from contracting the virus while also providing psychological support in the workplace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
15.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260321, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542188

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the emergency approval of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines, research into its vaccination hesitancy saw a substantial increase. However, the psychological behaviors associated with this hesitancy are still not completely understood. This study assessed the psychological antecedents associated with COVID-19 vaccination in the Arab population. METHODOLOGY: The validated Arabic version of the 5C questionnaire was distributed online across various social media platforms in Arabic-speaking countries. The questionnaire had three sections, namely, socio-demographics, COVID-19 related infection and vaccination, and the 5C scale of vaccine psychological antecedents of confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility. RESULTS: In total, 4,474 participants with a mean age of 32.48 ± 10.76 from 13 Arab countries made up the final sample, 40.8% of whom were male. Around 26.7% of the participants were found to be confident about the COVID-19 vaccination, 10.7% indicated complacency, 96.5% indicated they had no constraints, 48.8% had a preference for calculation and 40.4% indicated they had collective responsibility. The 5C antecedents varied across the studied countries with the confidence and collective responsibility being the highest in the United Arab Emirates (59.0% and 58.0%, respectively), complacency and constraints in Morocco (21.0% and 7.0%, respectively) and calculation in Sudan (60.0%). The regression analyses revealed that sex, age, educational degrees, being a health care professional, history of COVID-19 infection and having a relative infected or died from COVID-19 significantly predicted the 5C psychological antecedents by different degrees. CONCLUSION: There are wide psychological antecedent variations between Arab countries, and different determinants can have a profound effect on the COVID-19 vaccine's psychological antecedents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/psychology , Internet , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
16.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260355, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533421

ABSTRACT

Literature reports that fear and anxiety related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic may be a significant factor in promoting adherence to health-protective behaviours. This study aimed to validate an Arabic version of the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale (CAS). Participants aged 18 to 58 years of age were recruited from a university population (students and staff) as well as via social media from 22 June to 18 July 2020 when the United Arab Emirates was under a partial government-instituted lockdown. They completed Arabic versions of the CAS and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale. A confirmatory factor analysis produced a unidimensional structure and all items satisfactorily loaded onto this single factor (i.e., the physiological symptoms of fear and anxiety related to coronavirus). The Arabic CAS was internally consistent and concurrently valid. These preliminary findings suggest that the Arabic CAS is a valid and reliable instrument to employ in the assessment of dysfunctional anxiety related to coronavirus. The availability of this validated measure will enable the further conduct of a variety of mental health studies in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. It also holds clinical utility as a potential screening measure for those afflicted by anxiety symptomology during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , Fear/psychology , Psychometrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
World J Emerg Surg ; 16(1): 57, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 Pandemic lockdowns restricted human and traffic mobility impacting the patterns and severity of road traffic collisions (RTCs). We aimed to study the effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on incidence, patterns, severity of the injury, and outcomes of hospitalized RTCs trauma patients in Al-Ain City, United Arab Emirates. METHODS: We compared the data of two cohorts of patients which were collected over two periods; the Pandemic period (28 March 2020 to 27 March 2021) and the pre-pandemic period (28 March 2019 to 27 March 2020). All RTCs trauma patients who were hospitalized in the two major trauma centers (Al-Ain and Tawam Hospitals) of Al-Ain City were studied. RESULTS: Overall, the incidence of hospitalized RTC trauma patients significantly reduced by 33.5% during the Pandemic compared with the pre-pandemic period. The mechanism of injury was significantly different between the two periods (p < 0.0001, Fisher's Exact test). MVCs were less during the Pandemic (60.5% compared with 72%), while motorcycle injuries were more (23.3% compared with 11.2%). The mortality of hospitalized RTC patients was significantly higher during the Pandemic (4.4% compared with 2.3%, p = 0.045, Fisher's Exact test). Logistic regression showed that the significant factors that predicted mortality were the low GCS (p < 0.0001), admission to the ICU (p < 0.0001), and the high ISS (p = 0.045). COVID-19 Pandemic had a very strong trend (p = 0.058) for increased mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Our study has shown that the numbers of hospitalized RTC trauma patients reduced by 33.5% during the COVID-19 Pandemic compared with the pre-pandemic period in our setting. This was attributed to the reduced motor vehicle, pedestrian and bicycle injuries while motorcycle injuries increased. Mortality was significantly higher during the Pandemic, which was attributed to increased ISS and reduced GCS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Accidents, Traffic , Communicable Disease Control , Hospital Mortality , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
18.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 141, 2021 11 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526642

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the practices and resilience of most healthcare workers, including dieticians. In addition to offering critical care to COVID-19 patients, dieticians play a major role in preventing and managing conditions known to affect COVID-19, such as obesity and metabolic disorders. The objective of this study was to examine the conditions and changes in the work environment as well as resilience and its correlates among dieticians during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: A cross-sectional national survey was conducted among dieticians practicing in the UAE (n = 371), using a web-based questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed, in addition to the sociodemographic information, the practice-related characteristics and resilience of participants. For the latter the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale© was used. Descriptive statistics as well as simple and multiple linear regressions were used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: Of participants, 26.4% reported not having access to personal protective equipment and 50% indicated being concerned for their safety and health. Furthermore, considerable proportions of participants were not satisfied (45%) with the support nor with the appreciation (37.7%) they received during the pandemic. One in four dieticians considered quitting his/her job. While 65.8% of participants reported counseling COVID-19 patients, a third did not use any online platform for counseling. The most cited challenge to dietetic practice during the pandemic was 'maintaining work-life balance' (43.1%). The mean CD-RISC score was 72.0 ± 14.0. After adjustment, working in a hospital or public clinic (as opposed to private clinic), having a condition preventing face-to-face counseling, considering quitting job and feeling neutral or dissatisfied with the appreciation were associated with lower resilience scores, while counseling COVID-19 patients was associated with higher scores. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the fairly high resilience among dieticians practicing in the UAE during the COVID-19 pandemic, the findings of this study highlighted a few challenges, mainly related to safe practice environment, support for online counseling, and maintaining work-life balance. Concerted efforts of policy and decision makers ought to develop targeted programs for dieticians to ensure their retention and wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nutritionists , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
19.
BMJ Paediatr Open ; 5(1): e001219, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526509

ABSTRACT

We conducted a retrospective cohort review of 180 patients aged 0-18 years with positive COVID-19 nasal PCR swab admitted to the only designated paediatric COVID-19 hospital in Abu Dhabi from 1 March to 1 June 2020. 60 (33%) patients were asymptomatic, 117 (65%) patients had mild or moderate symptoms and 3 patients required intensive care with no mortality reported. Symptoms at presentation were fever in 84 patients, cough in 62 patients and gastrointestinal symptoms in 48 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
20.
Nephrology (Carlton) ; 27(3): 260-268, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515236

ABSTRACT

AIM: To establish the responses to the Sinopharm HB02 COVID-19 vaccination in the dialysis population, which are not well established. We examined the humoral responses to the Sinopharm COVID vaccine in haemodialysis patients. METHODS: Standard vaccinations (two doses at interval of ~21 days) were given to all consenting haemodialysis patients on dialysis (n = 1296). We measured the antibody responses at 14-21 days after the second vaccine to define the development of anti-spike antibodies >15 AU/ml after vaccination and observed the clinical effects of vaccination. RESULTS: Vaccination was very well tolerated with few side-effects. In those who consented to antibody measurements, (n = 446) baseline sampling showed 77 had positive antibodies, yet received full vaccination without any apparent adverse events. Positive anti-spike antibodies developed in 50% of the 270 baseline negative patients who had full sampling, compared with 78.1% in the general population. COVID infection continues to occur in both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals, but in the whole group vaccination appears to have been associated with a reduction in the case fatality rate. CONCLUSION: The humoral immune responses to standard HB02 vaccination schedules are attenuated in a haemodialysis cohort, but likely the vaccine saves lives. We suggest that an enhanced HB02 vaccination course or antibody checking may be prudent to protect this vulnerable group of patients. We suggest a booster dose of this vaccine at 3 months should be given to all dialysis patients, on the grounds that it is well tolerated even in those with good antibody levels and there may be a survival advantage.


Subject(s)
Antibody Formation , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibody Formation/drug effects , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/immunology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Renal Dialysis/methods , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Treatment Outcome , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology , Vaccination/methods , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccines, Inactivated
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