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2.
Rev Sci Tech ; 39(2): 503-512, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-854820

ABSTRACT

The world has recently witnessed the global impact of natural disease outbreaks, such as those caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), Ebola virus and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and the lasting impact of the accidental spread of foot and mouth disease in the United Kingdom. Natural outbreaks, of both emerging and re-emerging diseases, can have significant impacts on local, national and regional communities. An effective response to these outbreaks relies heavily on the coordination of both public health and Veterinary Services to identify the signs, symptoms and patterns of disease quickly and respond accordingly. The future global risks related to infectious disease are influenced by several factors, including human migration, urban development, agricultural development and climate change. As technology advances, we are more aware of the potential risks associated with dual-use equipment and research (defined as equipment or research that can be used for legitimate as well as nefarious purposes), synthetic biology, the engineering of biological systems, and the evolving modus operandi of criminals and terrorist groups. The ability to detect natural, accidental or deliberate outbreaks and incidents will rely heavily on cross-agency communication, establishment of informationsharing platforms, development of joint investigative strategies, and recognition that effective response requires a strong health and security agency interface. Therefore, the management of a suspicious biological incident requires intersectoral and interregional cooperation employing a comprehensive approach which considers prevention, preparedness, response and recovery and identifies and considers the unique characteristics and requirements of the incident.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Animals , Betacoronavirus , Humans , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
Br J Nurs ; 29(18): 1082-1083, 2020 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841275

ABSTRACT

Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses the Prime Minister's personal campaign to reduce the impact of COVID-19 by addressing rising levels of obesity in society.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Government , Humans , Pandemics , Policy , State Medicine , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(40): 1450-1456, 2020 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841256

ABSTRACT

During the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, reports of a new multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) have been increasing in Europe and the United States (1-3). Clinical features in children have varied but predominantly include shock, cardiac dysfunction, abdominal pain, and elevated inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, D-dimer, and interleukin-6 (1). Since June 2020, several case reports have described a similar syndrome in adults; this review describes in detail nine patients reported to CDC, seven from published case reports, and summarizes the findings in 11 patients described in three case series in peer-reviewed journals (4-6). These 27 patients had cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, dermatologic, and neurologic symptoms without severe respiratory illness and concurrently received positive test results for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antibody assays indicating recent infection. Reports of these patients highlight the recognition of an illness referred to here as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A), the heterogeneity of clinical signs and symptoms, and the role for antibody testing in identifying similar cases among adults. Clinicians and health departments should consider MIS-A in adults with compatible signs and symptoms. These patients might not have positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR or antigen test results, and antibody testing might be needed to confirm previous SARS-CoV-2 infection. Because of the temporal association between MIS-A and SARS-CoV-2 infections, interventions that prevent COVID-19 might prevent MIS-A. Further research is needed to understand the pathogenesis and long-term effects of this newly described condition.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adult , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
5.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 20(1): 600, 2020 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835822

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this national survey was to explore pregnant women's perceptions of COVID-19 and their healthcare experiences. METHODS: Through patient and public involvement, a questionnaire was developed and advertised via the BBC website, Twitter and other online media during May 2020. The findings were analysed by qualitative thematic analysis. Women who are currently pregnant, or who have delivered during the COVID-19 pandemic were invited to partake in a national online survey. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred fifty-one participants replied to the online questionnaire. Participants provided significant insight into the perceived barriers to seeking healthcare during this pandemic. These include 'not wanting to bother anyone', 'lack of wider support from allied healthcare workers' and the influence of the media. Other concerns included the use of virtual clinics antenatally and their acceptability to patients, the presence of birthing partners, and the way in which information is communicated about rapidly changing and evolving services. The influence of the media has also had a significant impact on the way women perceive hospital care in light of COVID-19 and for some, this has shaped whether they would seek help. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first ever reported study in the United Kingdom to explore pregnant women's perceptions of COVID-19 and their subsequent healthcare experiences. It has also provided insight into perceived barriers into seeking care as well as maternal concerns antenatally, intrapartum and postpartum.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Pregnant Women/psychology , Social Perception , Adult , Attitude to Health , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/psychology , Qualitative Research , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
6.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 8(6): e19494, 2020 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-829905

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak may motivate smokers to attempt to stop in greater numbers. However, given the temporary closure of UK stop smoking services and vape shops, smokers attempting to quit may instead seek out mobile health support, such as smartphone apps. OBJECTIVE: We examined, using an interrupted time series approach, whether the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak has been associated with a step change or increasing trend in UK downloads of an otherwise popular smoking cessation app, Smoke Free. METHODS: Data were from daily and nondaily adult smokers in the United Kingdom who had downloaded the Smoke Free app between January 1, 2020, and March 31, 2020 (primary analysis), and January 1, 2019, and March 31, 2020 (secondary analysis). The outcome variable was the number of downloads aggregated at the 12-hourly (primary analysis) or daily level (secondary analysis). The explanatory variable was the start of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, operationalized as March 1, 2020 (primary analysis), and January 15, 2020 (secondary analysis). Generalized additive mixed models adjusted for relevant covariates were fitted. RESULTS: Data were collected on 45,105 (primary analysis) and 119,881 (secondary analysis) users. In both analyses, there was no evidence for a step change or increasing trend in downloads attributable to the start of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Calculation of Bayes factors (BFs) indicated that the data for the primary analysis favored the null hypothesis compared with large associations (for level, BF=0.25; for slope, BF=0.26) but were insensitive to the detection of small associations (for level, BF=0.78; for slope, BF=1.35). CONCLUSIONS: In the United Kingdom, between January 1, 2020, and March 31, 2020, and between January 1, 2019, and March 31, 2020, there was no evidence that the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak has been associated with a large step change or increasing trend in downloads of a popular smoking cessation app. Findings on the association of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak with a small step change or increasing trend were inconclusive.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Smokers/psychology , Smoking Cessation/psychology , Adult , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Motivation , Pandemics , Smokers/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
11.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 81(9): 1-9, 2020 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807015

ABSTRACT

Guidance regarding appropriate use of personal protective equipment in hospitals is in constant flux as research into SARS-COV-2 transmission continues to develop our understanding of the virus. The risk associated with procedures classed as 'aerosol generating' is under constant debate. Current guidance is largely based on pragmatic and cautious logic, as there is little scientific evidence of aerosolization and transmission of respiratory viruses associated with procedures. The physical properties of aerosol particles which may contain viable virus have implications for the safe use of personal protective equipment and infection control protocols. As elective work in the NHS is reinstated, it is important that the implications of the possibility of airborne transmission of the virus in hospitals are more widely understood. This will facilitate appropriate use of personal protective equipment and help direct further research into the true risks of aerosolization during these procedures to allow safe streamlining of services for staff and patients.


Subject(s)
Air Microbiology , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Guideline Adherence/standards , Infection Control , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral , Risk Management/organization & administration , Aerosols , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/trends , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , United Kingdom/epidemiology
12.
BMJ Open ; 10(9): e042867, 2020 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807755

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine any change in referral patterns and outcomes in children (0-18) referred for child protection medical examination (CPME) during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with previous years. DESIGN: Retrospective observational study, analysing routinely collected clinical data from CPME reports in a rapid response to the pandemic lockdown. SETTING: Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust, which provides all routine CPME for Birmingham, England, population 1.1 million including 288 000 children. PARTICIPANTS: Children aged under 18 years attending CPME during an 18-week period from late February to late June during the years 2018-2020. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Numbers of referrals, source of disclosure and outcomes from CPME. RESULTS: There were 78 CPME referrals in 2018, 75 in 2019 and 47 in 2020, this was a 39.7% (95% CI 12.4% to 59.0%) reduction in referrals from 2018 to 2020, and a 37.3% (95% CI 8.6% to 57.4%) reduction from 2019 to 2020. There were fewer CPME referrals initiated by school staff in 2020, 12 (26%) compared with 36 (47%) and 38 (52%) in 2018 and 2019, respectively. In all years 75.9% of children were known to social care prior to CPME, and 94% of CPME concluded that there were significant safeguarding concerns. CONCLUSIONS: School closure due to COVID-19 may have harmed children as child abuse has remained hidden. There needs to be either mandatory attendance at schools in future or viable alternatives found. There may be a significant increase in safeguarding referrals when schools fully reopen as children disclose the abuse they have experienced at home.


Subject(s)
Child Abuse , Child Protective Services , Child Welfare , Communicable Disease Control , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , School Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child Abuse/prevention & control , Child Abuse/psychology , Child Abuse/statistics & numerical data , Child Protective Services/methods , Child Protective Services/statistics & numerical data , Child Welfare/statistics & numerical data , Child Welfare/trends , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Population , Social Isolation , Social Work/methods , Social Work/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
Lancet Public Health ; 5(10): e543-e550, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To date, research on the indirect impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the health of the population and the health-care system is scarce. We aimed to investigate the indirect effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on general practice health-care usage, and the subsequent diagnoses of common physical and mental health conditions in a deprived UK population. METHODS: We did a retrospective cohort study using routinely collected primary care data that was recorded in the Salford Integrated Record between Jan 1, 2010, and May 31, 2020. We extracted the weekly number of clinical codes entered into patient records overall, and for six high-level categories: symptoms and observations, diagnoses, prescriptions, operations and procedures, laboratory tests, and other diagnostic procedures. Negative binomial regression models were applied to monthly counts of first diagnoses of common conditions (common mental health problems, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer), and corresponding first prescriptions of medications indicative of these conditions. We used these models to predict the expected numbers of first diagnoses and first prescriptions between March 1 and May 31, 2020, which were then compared with the observed numbers for the same time period. FINDINGS: Between March 1 and May 31, 2020, 1073 first diagnoses of common mental health problems were reported compared with 2147 expected cases (95% CI 1821 to 2489) based on preceding years, representing a 50·0% reduction (95% CI 41·1 to 56·9). Compared with expected numbers, 456 fewer diagnoses of circulatory system diseases (43·3% reduction, 95% CI 29·6 to 53·5), and 135 fewer type 2 diabetes diagnoses (49·0% reduction, 23·8 to 63·1) were observed. The number of first prescriptions of associated medications was also lower than expected for the same time period. However, the gap between observed and expected cancer diagnoses (31 fewer; 16·0% reduction, -18·1 to 36·6) during this time period was not statistically significant. INTERPRETATION: In this deprived urban population, diagnoses of common conditions decreased substantially between March and May 2020, suggesting a large number of patients have undiagnosed conditions. A rebound in future workload could be imminent as COVID-19 restrictions ease and patients with undiagnosed conditions or delayed diagnosis present to primary and secondary health-care services. Such services should prioritise the diagnosis and treatment of these patients to mitigate potential indirect harms to protect public health. FUNDING: National Institute of Health Research.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diagnosis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Female , General Practice/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Middle Aged , Models, Statistical , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e19992, 2020 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803042

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the absence of a vaccine or effective treatment for COVID-19, countries have adopted nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) such as social distancing and full lockdown. An objective and quantitative means of passively monitoring the impact and response of these interventions at a local level is needed. OBJECTIVE: We aim to explore the utility of the recently developed open-source mobile health platform Remote Assessment of Disease and Relapse (RADAR)-base as a toolbox to rapidly test the effect and response to NPIs intended to limit the spread of COVID-19. METHODS: We analyzed data extracted from smartphone and wearable devices, and managed by the RADAR-base from 1062 participants recruited in Italy, Spain, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. We derived nine features on a daily basis including time spent at home, maximum distance travelled from home, the maximum number of Bluetooth-enabled nearby devices (as a proxy for physical distancing), step count, average heart rate, sleep duration, bedtime, phone unlock duration, and social app use duration. We performed Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by post hoc Dunn tests to assess differences in these features among baseline, prelockdown, and during lockdown periods. We also studied behavioral differences by age, gender, BMI, and educational background. RESULTS: We were able to quantify expected changes in time spent at home, distance travelled, and the number of nearby Bluetooth-enabled devices between prelockdown and during lockdown periods (P<.001 for all five countries). We saw reduced sociality as measured through mobility features and increased virtual sociality through phone use. People were more active on their phones (P<.001 for Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom), spending more time using social media apps (P<.001 for Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands), particularly around major news events. Furthermore, participants had a lower heart rate (P<.001 for Italy and Spain; P=.02 for Denmark), went to bed later (P<.001 for Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands), and slept more (P<.001 for Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom). We also found that young people had longer homestay than older people during the lockdown and fewer daily steps. Although there was no significant difference between the high and low BMI groups in time spent at home, the low BMI group walked more. CONCLUSIONS: RADAR-base, a freely deployable data collection platform leveraging data from wearables and mobile technologies, can be used to rapidly quantify and provide a holistic view of behavioral changes in response to public health interventions as a result of infectious outbreaks such as COVID-19. RADAR-base may be a viable approach to implementing an early warning system for passively assessing the local compliance to interventions in epidemics and pandemics, and could help countries ease out of lockdown.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Data Collection , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Smartphone , Social Isolation , Telemedicine , Wearable Electronic Devices , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Mass Index , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Monitoring, Physiologic , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Social Media , Spain/epidemiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
Br J Nurs ; 29(17): 1044-1045, 2020 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797628

ABSTRACT

Lauren Oliver, formerly Clinical Nurse Advisor, NHS Nightingale North West, outlines the challenges faced by staff in providing good-quality end-of-life care for patients in a temporary hospital during the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitals, State , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Terminal Care/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , State Medicine/organization & administration , United Kingdom/epidemiology
18.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(3): e19773, 2020 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-791866

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Routinely recorded primary care data have been used for many years by sentinel networks for surveillance. More recently, real world data have been used for a wider range of research projects to support rapid, inexpensive clinical trials. Because the partial national lockdown in the United Kingdom due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in decreasing community disease incidence, much larger numbers of general practices are needed to deliver effective COVID-19 surveillance and contribute to in-pandemic clinical trials. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this protocol is to describe the rapid design and development of the Oxford Royal College of General Practitioners Clinical Informatics Digital Hub (ORCHID) and its first two platforms. The Surveillance Platform will provide extended primary care surveillance, while the Trials Platform is a streamlined clinical trials platform that will be integrated into routine primary care practice. METHODS: We will apply the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) metadata principles to a new, integrated digital health hub that will extract routinely collected general practice electronic health data for use in clinical trials and provide enhanced communicable disease surveillance. The hub will be findable through membership in Health Data Research UK and European metadata repositories. Accessibility through an online application system will provide access to study-ready data sets or developed custom data sets. Interoperability will be facilitated by fixed linkage to other key sources such as Hospital Episodes Statistics and the Office of National Statistics using pseudonymized data. All semantic descriptors (ie, ontologies) and code used for analysis will be made available to accelerate analyses. We will also make data available using common data models, starting with the US Food and Drug Administration Sentinel and Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership approaches, to facilitate international studies. The Surveillance Platform will provide access to data for health protection and promotion work as authorized through agreements between Oxford, the Royal College of General Practitioners, and Public Health England. All studies using the Trials Platform will go through appropriate ethical and other regulatory approval processes. RESULTS: The hub will be a bottom-up, professionally led network that will provide benefits for member practices, our health service, and the population served. Data will only be used for SQUIRE (surveillance, quality improvement, research, and education) purposes. We have already received positive responses from practices, and the number of practices in the network has doubled to over 1150 since February 2020. COVID-19 surveillance has resulted in tripling of the number of virology sites to 293 (target 300), which has aided the collection of the largest ever weekly total of surveillance swabs in the United Kingdom as well as over 3000 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) serology samples. Practices are recruiting to the PRINCIPLE (Platform Randomised trial of INterventions against COVID-19 In older PeopLE) trial, and these participants will be followed up through ORCHID. These initial outputs demonstrate the feasibility of ORCHID to provide an extended national digital health hub. CONCLUSIONS: ORCHID will provide equitable and innovative use of big data through a professionally led national primary care network and the application of FAIR principles. The secure data hub will host routinely collected general practice data linked to other key health care repositories for clinical trials and support enhanced in situ surveillance without always requiring large volume data extracts. ORCHID will support rapid data extraction, analysis, and dissemination with the aim of improving future research and development in general practice to positively impact patient care. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/19773.


Subject(s)
Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , General Practice/organization & administration , Medical Records Systems, Computerized , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health Surveillance , Humans , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Societies, Medical , United Kingdom/epidemiology
19.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(4)2020 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-789590

ABSTRACT

The National Health Service (NHS) has rapidly adopted telemedicine solutions as an alternative to face-to-face consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of HCPs (Healthcare Professionals) were unfamiliar with Telemedicine prior to the current pandemic. Remote consultation is expected to continue for the foreseeable future, thus we designed this survey. A survey designed to evaluate the use of telephone consultation by HCPs, assessing its implementation, challenges and drawbacks. A web link survey conducted through SurveyMonkey was sent to HCPs across six UK Trusts the period of May 2020. The survey received 114 responses (84%) being doctors. 95% of respondents had not received training prior to engaging in telemedicine consultations. 64% were unaware of the updated General Medical Council guidance concerning remote consultations. The most common barrier in remote consultation was the inability to access patient records raised by 37% of respondents. However, 73% of respondents felt that patients understood their medical condition and the instructions given to them over the phone, and 70% agreed that videoconference consultations would add to patients care. Telemedicine can be used for selected groups of patients in the post COVID-19 era, and the HCPs carrying that should have the sufficient experience and knowledge expected to operate these clinics.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine , Betacoronavirus , Gynecology , Humans , Nurse Clinicians , Obstetrics , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Physicians , Surgeons , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
20.
Fam Process ; 59(3): 1024-1033, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787775

ABSTRACT

Like a meteor hitting the earth's surface, 44, 131‡ unexpected deaths have shaken, disturbed, and saddened the core of our nation. This reflection considers the consequences of the coronavirus crisis in the UK with particular reference to the impact on families and on the practice of family therapists. The perspective presented can only be partial because of the fast-changing situation and the limited access to alternative perspectives that are available during this period of relational lockdown. The author provides a systemic understanding of what has happened and what is happening.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Family Therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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