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1.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 636, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671552

ABSTRACT

Worldwide, racial and ethnic minorities have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 with increased risk of infection, its related complications, and death. In the initial phase of population-based vaccination in the United States (U.S.) and United Kingdom (U.K.), vaccine hesitancy may result in differences in uptake. We performed a cohort study among U.S. and U.K. participants who volunteered to take part in the smartphone-based COVID Symptom Study (March 2020-February 2021) and used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios of vaccine hesitancy and uptake. In the U.S. (n = 87,388), compared to white participants, vaccine hesitancy was greater for Black and Hispanic participants and those reporting more than one or other race. In the U.K. (n = 1,254,294), racial and ethnic minority participants showed similar levels of vaccine hesitancy to the U.S. However, associations between participant race and ethnicity and levels of vaccine uptake were observed to be different in the U.S. and the U.K. studies. Among U.S. participants, vaccine uptake was significantly lower among Black participants, which persisted among participants that self-reported being vaccine-willing. In contrast, statistically significant racial and ethnic disparities in vaccine uptake were not observed in the U.K sample. In this study of self-reported vaccine hesitancy and uptake, lower levels of vaccine uptake in Black participants in the U.S. during the initial vaccine rollout may be attributable to both hesitancy and disparities in access.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , /statistics & numerical data , /statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Female , /statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups/psychology , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Self Report , United Kingdom/ethnology , United States/epidemiology , /statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
3.
Arch Psychiatr Nurs ; 34(6): 507-512, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693292

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease caused by the novel coronavirus Covid-19 is a current worldwide outbreak. The use of quarantine and isolation proved effective in containing the spread of infection. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the mental health of Albanian people residing in the country and abroad during the quarantine period for the Covid-19 pandemic. DESIGN: This study was carried out from 25th March - 20th April 2020 through a web survey shared on social networks. The goal was to reach at least the minimum sample size for cross-sectional studies. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess mental health. Chi-square (χ2) and Fisher -Exact test were used to assess the statistical significance among variables. P values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: 715 participants were included in the final analyses (78.41% females and 21.53% males). Most were residents in Albania (80.41%) and the others resided mainly in Italy (6.89%), Greece (3.51%), Germany (2.43%), Kosovo (1.62%) and the UK (1.69%). Statistical association was found between gender, country of residency and measures taken. Summary score of PHQ-9 items was 6.4662. The total score of depression classification shows that 31.82% and 12.90% of participants have respectively mild and moderate depression. Female participants showed the highest score for some items of PHQ-9, p≤0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that health care professionals should recognize and address mental health problems associated with Covid-19 especially in vulnerable groups. Acting in a timely and proper manner is essential in preventing these problems from becoming chronic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/psychology , Depressive Disorder/ethnology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/ethnology , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Albania/ethnology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Germany/ethnology , Greece/ethnology , Humans , Italy/ethnology , Kosovo , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/ethnology , Young Adult
5.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(5): 465-467, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-457289

ABSTRACT

This article outlines the mental health burden of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom population, and presents preliminary evidence of less common psychiatric issues, such as paranoia and hallucinations, to which vulnerable groups in the U.K. population may be more vulnerable. It is argued that cognitive-behavioral therapy, with components of mindfulness, should be part of the therapeutic response. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Behavioral Symptoms , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Coronavirus Infections , Cost of Illness , Hallucinations , Mindfulness , Pandemics , Paranoid Disorders , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Isolation , Behavioral Symptoms/ethnology , Behavioral Symptoms/etiology , Behavioral Symptoms/therapy , COVID-19 , Hallucinations/ethnology , Hallucinations/etiology , Hallucinations/therapy , Humans , Minority Groups , Paranoid Disorders/ethnology , Paranoid Disorders/etiology , Paranoid Disorders/therapy , United Kingdom/ethnology , Vulnerable Populations
6.
Br J Psychiatry ; 217(2): 405-407, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-176067

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has changed our lives and it appears to be especially harmful for some groups more than others. Black and Asian ethnic minorities are at particular risk and have reported greater mortality and intensive care needs. Mental illnesses are more common among Black and ethnic minorities, as are crisis care pathways including compulsory admission. This editorial sets out what might underlie these two phenomena, explaining how societal structures and disadvantage generate and can escalate inequalities in crises.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Mental Disorders/ethnology , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , United Kingdom/ethnology
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