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1.
Obstet Gynecol ; 138(4): 542-551, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621687

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic altered risk of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes and whether there were differences by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection status among pregnant women. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study using Epic's Cosmos research platform, women who delivered during the pandemic (March-December 2020) were compared with those who delivered prepandemic (matched months 2017-2019). Within the pandemic epoch, those who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection were compared with those with negative test results or no SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis. Comparisons were performed using standardized differences, with a value greater than 0.1 indicating meaningful differences between groups. RESULTS: Among 838,489 women (225,225 who delivered during the pandemic), baseline characteristics were similar between epochs. There were no significant differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes between epochs (standardized difference<0.10). In the pandemic epoch, 108,067 (48.0%) women had SARS-CoV-2 testing available; of those, 7,432 (6.9%) had positive test results. Compared with women classified as negative for SARS-CoV-2 infection, those who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection were less likely to be non-Hispanic White or Asian or to reside in the Midwest and more likely to be Hispanic, have public insurance, be obese, and reside in the South or in high social vulnerability ZIP codes. There were no significant differences in the frequency of preterm birth (8.5% vs 7.6%, standardized difference=0.032), stillbirth (0.4% vs 0.4%, standardized difference=-0.002), small for gestational age (6.4% vs 6.5%, standardized difference=-0.002), large for gestational age (7.7% vs 7.7%, standardized difference=-0.001), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (16.3% vs 15.8%, standardized difference=0.014), placental abruption (0.5% vs 0.4%, standardized difference=0.007), cesarean birth (31.2% vs 29.4%, standardized difference=0.039), or postpartum hemorrhage (3.4% vs 3.1%, standardized difference=0.019) between those who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection and those classified as testing negative. CONCLUSION: In a geographically diverse U.S. cohort, the frequency of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes did not differ between those delivering before compared with during the pandemic, nor between those classified as positive compared with negative for SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
4.
Nutrients ; 14(1)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613922

ABSTRACT

The article by D'Avolio and colleagues [...].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamins/blood , Humans , Incidence , Patient Acuity , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
5.
Euro Surveill ; 27(1)2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613509

ABSTRACT

BackgroundCruise ships provide an ideal setting for transmission of SARS-CoV-2, given the socially dense exposure environment.AimTo provide a comprehensive review of COVID-19 outbreaks on cruise ships.MethodsPubMed was searched for COVID-19 cases associated with cruise ships between January and October 2020. A list of cruise ships with COVID-19 was cross-referenced with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's list of cruise ships associated with a COVID-19 case within 14 days of disembarkation. News articles were also searched for epidemiological information. Narratives of COVID-19 outbreaks on ships with over 100 cases are presented.ResultsSeventy-nine ships and 104 unique voyages were associated with COVID-19 cases before 1 October 2020. Nineteen ships had more than one voyage with a case of COVID-19. The median number of cases per ship was three (interquartile range (IQR): 1-17.8), with two notable outliers: the Diamond Princess and the Ruby Princess, which had 712 and 907 cases, respectively. The median attack rate for COVID-19 was 0.2% (IQR: 0.03-1.5), although this distribution was right-skewed with a mean attack rate of 3.7%; 25.9% (27/104) of voyages had at least one COVID-19-associated death. Outbreaks involving only crew occurred later than outbreaks involving guests and crew.ConclusionsIn the absence of mitigation measures, COVID-19 can spread easily on cruise ships in a susceptible population because of the confined space and high-density contact networks. This environment can create superspreader events and facilitate international spread.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ships , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
6.
Nursing ; 52(1): 38-43, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612691

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This article discusses the interconnection between the syndemic effect of racial inequities and disparities as well as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Black Americans. It also highlights meaningful reforms and priorities to achieve health equity in Black communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Racism , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndemic , United States/epidemiology
7.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(3): 225-230, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604163

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In America, the United States was particularly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVEs: To estimate how many daily COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 population would have been avoided if each one of five restrictive measures had been implemented at the time of diagnosis and to estimate a multiple linear regression model predictive of the number of deaths per 100,000 population based on the measures adopted by the countries. METHODS: A simple linear regression was performed between the days elapsed since the first COVID-19 diagnosed case and the implementation of each one of the five restrictive measures by the 27 American countries studied and the number of COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 population. RESULTS: For each day between the first COVID-19 reported case and the adoption of restrictive measures, between 0.250 (p = 0.021) and 0.600 (p = 0.001) patients per 100,000 population died, depending on the measure in question. CONCLUSIONS: Adoption of restrictive measures and social distancing are necessary for reducing the number of people infected with COVID-19 and their mortality. In addition, promptness of their establishment is essential in order to reduce the number of deaths.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Time Factors , United States/epidemiology
8.
Curr Opin Pediatr ; 34(1): 2-7, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604018

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article describes the impacts of food insecurity (FI) on child health, outlines clinical and public policy interventions to mitigate FI in children, and defines new paradigms in population health to ameliorate the harmful effects of FI in children. RECENT FINDINGS: Rates of FI among children have dramatically increased with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, with particular adverse impact on low-income children. Population health innovations in screening, referral, and social service integration offer new opportunities to address FI. SUMMARY: Despite advances in clinical practice and public policy, FI remains a persistent issue for many US children. Clinicians and policymakers have opportunities to leverage clinical and community-based integration to improve service delivery opportunities to ameliorate childhood hunger and racial and socioeconomic inequity in the United States.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Food Insecurity , Humans , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology
9.
Am J Health Behav ; 45(6): 1079-1090, 2021 11 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606953

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This research examines social distancing changes over time, and by region of the United States after the COVID-19 pandemic began. METHODS: We utilized information on social distancing from the Google Community Mobility Reports. We performed one-way repeated-measure analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) to examine the overall changes in the 6 types of social distancing from baseline to the 12-week follow-up (March 1 to May 24, 2020). We applied a 2-way RM-ANOVA to evaluate the effects of time and 4 regions on social distancing. RESULTS: According to one-way RM-ANOVA results, social distancing tended to increase until Time 3 (March 30 to April 12) and 4 (April 13 to April 26), before decreasing again, regardless of the area. The 2-way RM-ANOVA results revealed that the social distancing variations in the 6 area types over time were statistically significant in each region, along with the interaction of regions and time. Compared to other regions, social distancing was the highest in the Northeast area, except in park areas. CONCLUSIONS: We found that social distancing can be influenced not only by contagion changes, but also by regional differences. Understanding the features of social distancing can play a significant role in helping society build a promising COVID-19 prevention model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
10.
11.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 6(1)2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606097

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the outcomes of coronavirus disease (COVID-19)-positive patients undergoing hip fracture surgery using a national database. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study comparing hip fracture surgery outcomes between COVID-19 positive and negative matched cohorts from 46 sites in the United States. Patients aged 65 and older with hip fracture surgery between March 15 and December 31, 2020, were included. The main outcomes were 30-day all-cause mortality and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: In this national study that included 3303 adults with hip fracture surgery, the 30-day mortality was 14.6% with COVID-19-positive versus 3.8% in COVID-19-negative, a notable difference. The all-cause mortality for hip fracture surgery was 27.0% in the COVID-19-positive group during the study period. DICUSSION: We found higher incidence of all-cause mortality in patients with versus without diagnosis of COVID-19 after undergoing hip fracture surgery. The mortality in hip fracture surgery in this national analysis was lower than other local and regional reports. The medical community can use this information to guide the management of hip fracture patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hip Fractures , Adult , Cohort Studies , Hip Fractures/surgery , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(1): e2142046, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605268

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a distinct spatiotemporal pattern in the United States. Patients with cancer are at higher risk of severe complications from COVID-19, but it is not well known whether COVID-19 outcomes in this patient population were associated with geography. Objective: To quantify spatiotemporal variation in COVID-19 outcomes among patients with cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: This registry-based retrospective cohort study included patients with a historical diagnosis of invasive malignant neoplasm and laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between March and November 2020. Data were collected from cancer care delivery centers in the United States. Exposures: Patient residence was categorized into 9 US census divisions. Cancer center characteristics included academic or community classification, rural-urban continuum code (RUCC), and social vulnerability index. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality. The secondary composite outcome consisted of receipt of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission, and all-cause death. Multilevel mixed-effects models estimated associations of center-level and census division-level exposures with outcomes after adjustment for patient-level risk factors and quantified variation in adjusted outcomes across centers, census divisions, and calendar time. Results: Data for 4749 patients (median [IQR] age, 66 [56-76] years; 2439 [51.4%] female individuals, 1079 [22.7%] non-Hispanic Black individuals, and 690 [14.5%] Hispanic individuals) were reported from 83 centers in the Northeast (1564 patients [32.9%]), Midwest (1638 [34.5%]), South (894 [18.8%]), and West (653 [13.8%]). After adjustment for patient characteristics, including month of COVID-19 diagnosis, estimated 30-day mortality rates ranged from 5.2% to 26.6% across centers. Patients from centers located in metropolitan areas with population less than 250 000 (RUCC 3) had lower odds of 30-day mortality compared with patients from centers in metropolitan areas with population at least 1 million (RUCC 1) (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.31; 95% CI, 0.11-0.84). The type of center was not significantly associated with primary or secondary outcomes. There were no statistically significant differences in outcome rates across the 9 census divisions, but adjusted mortality rates significantly improved over time (eg, September to November vs March to May: aOR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.17-0.58). Conclusions and Relevance: In this registry-based cohort study, significant differences in COVID-19 outcomes across US census divisions were not observed. However, substantial heterogeneity in COVID-19 outcomes across cancer care delivery centers was found. Attention to implementing standardized guidelines for the care of patients with cancer and COVID-19 could improve outcomes for these vulnerable patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Rural Population , Social Vulnerability , Urban Population , Aged , Cause of Death , Censuses , Female , Health Facilities , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Registries , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Spatial Analysis , United States/epidemiology
13.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol ; 16(11): 1695-1703, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596096

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound effect on transplantation activity in the United States and globally. Several single-center reports suggest higher morbidity and mortality among candidates waitlisted for a kidney transplant and recipients of a kidney transplant. We aim to describe 2020 mortality patterns during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States among kidney transplant candidates and recipients. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Using national registry data for waitlisted candidates and kidney transplant recipients collected through April 23, 2021, we report demographic and clinical factors associated with COVID-19-related mortality in 2020, other deaths in 2020, and deaths in 2019 among waitlisted candidates and transplant recipients. We quantify excess all-cause deaths among candidate and recipient populations in 2020 and deaths directly attributed to COVID-19 in relation to prepandemic mortality patterns in 2019 and 2018. RESULTS: Among deaths of patients who were waitlisted in 2020, 11% were attributed to COVID-19, and these candidates were more likely to be male, obese, and belong to a racial/ethnic minority group. Nearly one in six deaths (16%) among active transplant recipients in the United States in 2020 was attributed to COVID-19. Recipients who died of COVID-19 were younger, more likely to be obese, had lower educational attainment, and were more likely to belong to racial/ethnic minority groups than those who died of other causes in 2020 or 2019. We found higher overall mortality in 2020 among waitlisted candidates (24%) than among kidney transplant recipients (20%) compared with 2019. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis demonstrates higher rates of mortality associated with COVID-19 among waitlisted candidates and kidney transplant recipients in the United States in 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Kidney Transplantation/mortality , Transplant Recipients , Waiting Lists/mortality , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cause of Death , Female , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
14.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 154-164, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599518

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To estimate the direct and indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on overall, race/ethnicity‒specific, and age-specific mortality in 2020 in the United States. Methods. Using surveillance data, we modeled expected mortality, compared it to observed mortality, and estimated the share of "excess" mortality that was indirectly attributable to the pandemic versus directly attributed to COVID-19. We present absolute risks and proportions of total pandemic-related mortality, stratified by race/ethnicity and age. Results. We observed 16.6 excess deaths per 10 000 US population in 2020; 84% were directly attributed to COVID-19. The indirect effects of the pandemic accounted for 16% of excess mortality, with proportions as low as 0% among adults aged 85 years and older and more than 60% among those aged 15 to 44 years. Indirect causes accounted for a higher proportion of excess mortality among racially minoritized groups (e.g., 32% among Black Americans and 23% among Native Americans) compared with White Americans (11%). Conclusions. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mortality and health disparities are underestimated when only deaths directly attributed to COVID-19 are considered. An equitable public health response to the pandemic should also consider its indirect effects on mortality. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):154-164. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306541).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mortality , Statistics as Topic , Adolescent , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Middle Aged , Risk , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
15.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(5152): 1766-1772, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599145

ABSTRACT

During June 2021, the highly transmissible† B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, became the predominant circulating strain in the United States. U.S. pediatric COVID-19-related hospitalizations increased during July-August 2021 following emergence of the Delta variant and peaked in September 2021.§ As of May 12, 2021, CDC recommended COVID-19 vaccinations for persons aged ≥12 years,¶ and on November 2, 2021, COVID-19 vaccinations were recommended for persons aged 5-11 years.** To date, clinical signs and symptoms, illness course, and factors contributing to hospitalizations during the period of Delta predominance have not been well described in pediatric patients. CDC partnered with six children's hospitals to review medical record data for patients aged <18 years with COVID-19-related hospitalizations during July-August 2021.†† Among 915 patients identified, 713 (77.9%) were hospitalized for COVID-19 (acute COVID-19 as the primary or contributing reason for hospitalization), 177 (19.3%) had incidental positive SARS-CoV-2 test results (asymptomatic or mild infection unrelated to the reason for hospitalization), and 25 (2.7%) had multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a rare but serious inflammatory condition associated with COVID-19.§§ Among the 713 patients hospitalized for COVID-19, 24.7% were aged <1 year, 17.1% were aged 1-4 years, 20.1% were aged 5-11 years, and 38.1% were aged 12-17 years. Approximately two thirds of patients (67.5%) had one or more underlying medical conditions, with obesity being the most common (32.4%); among patients aged 12-17 years, 61.4% had obesity. Among patients hospitalized for COVID-19, 15.8% had a viral coinfection¶¶ (66.4% of whom had respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] infection). Approximately one third (33.9%) of patients aged <5 years hospitalized for COVID-19 had a viral coinfection. Among 272 vaccine-eligible (aged 12-17 years) patients hospitalized for COVID-19, one (0.4%) was fully vaccinated.*** Approximately one half (54.0%) of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 received oxygen support, 29.5% were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), and 1.5% died; of those requiring respiratory support, 14.5% required invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Among pediatric patients with COVID-19-related hospitalizations, many had severe illness and viral coinfections, and few vaccine-eligible patients hospitalized for COVID-19 were vaccinated, highlighting the importance of vaccination for those aged ≥5 years and other prevention strategies to protect children and adolescents from COVID-19, particularly those with underlying medical conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Infant , Male , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
17.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0262115, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595959

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Ankle fractures have continued to occur through the COVID pandemic and, regardless of patient COVID status, often need operative intervention for optimizing long-term outcomes. For healthcare optimization, patient counseling, and care planning, understanding if COVID-positive patients undergoing ankle fracture surgery are at increased risk for perioperative adverse outcomes is of interest. METHODS: The COVID-19 Research Database contains recent United States aggregated insurance claims. Patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery from April 1st, 2020 to June 15th, 2020 were identified. COVID status was identified by ICD coding. Demographics, comorbidities, and postoperative complications were extracted based on administrative data. COVID-positive versus negative patients were compared with univariate analyses. Propensity-score matching was done on the basis of age, sex, and comorbidities. Multivariate regression was then performed to identify risk factors independently associated with the occurrence of 30-day postoperative adverse events. RESULTS: In total, 9,835 patients undergoing ankle fracture surgery were identified, of which 57 (0.58%) were COVID-positive. COVID-positive ankle fracture patients demonstrated a higher prevalence of comorbidities, including: chronic kidney disease, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity (p<0.05 for each). After propensity matching and controlling for all preoperative variables, multivariate analysis found that COVID-positive patients were at increased risk of any adverse event (odds ratio [OR] = 3.89, p = 0.002), a serious adverse event (OR = 5.48, p = 0.002), and a minor adverse event (OR = 3.10, p = 0.021). DISCUSSION: COVID-positive patients will continue to present with ankle fractures requiring operative intervention. Even after propensity matching and controlling for patient factors, COVID-positive patients were found to be at increased risk of 30-day perioperative adverse events. Not only do treatment teams need to be protected from the transmission of COVID in such situations, but the increased incidence of perioperative adverse events needs to be considered.


Subject(s)
Ankle Fractures/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Open Fracture Reduction/adverse effects , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(2)2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593390

ABSTRACT

We consider epidemiological modeling for the design of COVID-19 interventions in university populations, which have seen significant outbreaks during the pandemic. A central challenge is sensitivity of predictions to input parameters coupled with uncertainty about these parameters. Nearly 2 y into the pandemic, parameter uncertainty remains because of changes in vaccination efficacy, viral variants, and mask mandates, and because universities' unique characteristics hinder translation from the general population: a high fraction of young people, who have higher rates of asymptomatic infection and social contact, as well as an enhanced ability to implement behavioral and testing interventions. We describe an epidemiological model that formed the basis for Cornell University's decision to reopen for in-person instruction in fall 2020 and supported the design of an asymptomatic screening program instituted concurrently to prevent viral spread. We demonstrate how the structure of these decisions allowed risk to be minimized despite parameter uncertainty leading to an inability to make accurate point estimates and how this generalizes to other university settings. We find that once-per-week asymptomatic screening of vaccinated undergraduate students provides substantial value against the Delta variant, even if all students are vaccinated, and that more targeted testing of the most social vaccinated students provides further value.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Return to School/methods , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Decision Making , Humans , Mass Screening , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Uncertainty , United States/epidemiology , Universities , Vaccination
19.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 165-168, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592228

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To test whether distortions in the age distribution of deaths can track pandemic activity. Methods. We compared weekly distributions of all-cause deaths by age during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States from March to December 2020 with corresponding prepandemic weekly baseline distributions derived from data for 2015 to 2019. We measured distortions via Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) and χ2 goodness-of-fit statistics as well as deaths among individuals aged 65 years or older as a percentage of total deaths (PERC65+). We computed bivariate correlations between these measures and the number of recorded COVID-19 deaths for the corresponding weeks. Results. Elevated COVID-19-associated fatalities were accompanied by greater distortions in the age structure of mortality. Distortions in the age distribution of weekly US COVID-19 deaths in 2020 relative to earlier years were highly correlated with COVID fatalities (K-S: r = 0.71, P < .001; χ2: r = 0.90, P < .001; PERC65+: r = 0.85, P < .001). Conclusions. A population-representative sample of age-at-death data can serve as a useful means of pandemic activity surveillance when precise cause-of-death data are incomplete, inaccurate, or unavailable, as is often the case in low-resource environments. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):165-168. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306567).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mortality , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Humans , Middle Aged , Statistics as Topic , Statistics, Nonparametric , United States/epidemiology
20.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 169-178, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591240

ABSTRACT

Objectives. To assess the association between individual-level adherence to social-distancing and personal hygiene behaviors recommended by public health experts and subsequent risk of COVID-19 diagnosis in the United States. Methods. Data are from waves 7 through 26 (June 10, 2020-April 26, 2021) of the Understanding America Study COVID-19 survey. We used Cox models to assess the relationship between engaging in behaviors considered high risk and risk of COVID-19 diagnosis. Results. Individuals engaging in behaviors indicating lack of adherence to social-distancing guidelines, especially those related to large gatherings or public interactions, had a significantly higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis than did those who did not engage in these behaviors. Each additional risk behavior was associated with a 9% higher risk of COVID-19 diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05, 1.13). Results were similar after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and local infection rates. Conclusions. Personal mitigation behaviors appear to influence the risk of COVID-19, even in the presence of social factors related to infection risk. Public Health Implications. Our findings emphasize the importance of individual behaviors for preventing COVID-19, which may be relevant in contexts with low vaccination. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):169-178. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306565).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Risk Behaviors , Hygiene , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
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