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1.
Low Urin Tract Symptoms ; 14(4): 301-304, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741474

ABSTRACT

CASE: Since the declaration of COVID-19 as a pandemic, other unexpected symptoms related to the infection besides the respiratory system have been reported. Although a few case reports have revealed that adult patients with COVID-19 also complained of urinary frequency and nocturia, the exact pathophysiology is still unclear. In this case series, we present three children aged 14 to 17 years with urodynamically proven lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) following COVID-19. OUTCOME: None of the patients had constipation or bowel disorder before the diagnosis of COVID-19. In addition, neurological examination and related imaging revealed no signs of etiological factors. The median time from diagnosis of COVID-19 infection to the onset of lower urinary tract symptoms was 3 months. Incomplete bladder emptying/urinary retention supported by increased bladder compliance, high post-micturition residual urine volumes, and absence of detrusor pressure increase during the voiding phase in the pressure flow study (acontractile detrusor in two patients and hypocontractile detrusor in one patient) were observed. CONCLUSION: We observed that LUTD (eg, incomplete bladder emptying, urinary retention) can be prominent some time after the diagnosis of COVID-19. Even though psychogenic or neurogenic causes may not be excluded completely, clinicians should be aware of a recent COVID-19 infection in children with sudden-onset LUTD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Urinary Retention , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Humans , Urinary Bladder , Urinary Retention/etiology , Urination/physiology , Urodynamics
2.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 5189, 2020 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454803

ABSTRACT

Stapled hemorrhoidopexy has a few advantages such as less postoperative pain and faster recovery compared with conventional hemorrhoidectomy. There are two major devices used for stapled hemorrhoidopexy, PPH stapler (Ethicon EndoSurgery) and DST stapler (Covidien). This study was conducted to investigate the postoperative outcomes among patients with grade III and IV hemorrhoids who underwent hemorrhoidopexy with either of these two devices. A total of 242 consecutive patients underwent stapled hemorrhoidopexy with either PPH stapler (110 patients) or DST stapler (132 patients) at a single center in 2017. We performed a retrospective case-control study to compare the short-term postoperative outcomes and the complications between these two groups. After matching the cases in terms of age, gender, and the grade of hemorrhoids, there were 100 patients in each group (PPH versus DST). There were no significant differences in the postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score and analgesic usage. Among complications, the incidence of anorectal stricture was significantly higher in the DST group (p = 0.02). Evaluation of the mucosal specimen showed that the total surface area, the muscle/mucosa ratio and the surface area of the muscle were also significantly higher in the DST group (p = 0.03). Further analysis of the DST group demonstrated that patients with anorectal stricture after surgery are younger than patients without anorectal stricture, and higher muscle/mucosa ratio (p = 0.03) and a higher surface area of the muscle (p = 0.03) also measured in the surgical specimen. The two devices provide similar outcomes of postoperative recovery. Patients who underwent DST stapled hemorrhoidopexy had a higher incidence rate of stricture, larger area of muscle excision, and higher muscle/mucosa ratio in the surgical specimen. Further investigation is warranted for a better understanding of the correlation between muscle excision and anorectal stricture.


Subject(s)
Hemorrhoidectomy/instrumentation , Hemorrhoids/surgery , Surgical Staplers , Acetaminophen/therapeutic use , Anal Canal/pathology , Analgesics/therapeutic use , Anus Diseases/etiology , Constriction, Pathologic/etiology , Equipment Design , Female , Hemorrhage/etiology , Humans , Intestinal Mucosa/pathology , Isoxazoles/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Size , Pain, Postoperative/drug therapy , Pain, Postoperative/etiology , Pain, Postoperative/prevention & control , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Urinary Retention/etiology
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115111

ABSTRACT

We describe a case of retrovesical liposarcoma in a male patient with concurrent COVID-19. A 50-year-old man had lower urinary tract symptoms and dull pain along his right gluteus. Due to COVID-19 infection, management was delayed. During self-isolation, the patient developed urinary retention and his pain level was an eight on the Visual Analogue Scale. A urinary catheter and an epidural catheter were inserted without any difficulty. Abdominal-pelvic MRI revealed a retrovesical mass suspected of liposarcoma with clear borders from surrounding organs. Following two consecutive negative SARS-CoV-2 PCR tests, we proceeded with surgery. Histopathology was dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Postoperatively, the patient suffered reactivation of COVID-19, and he was eventually discharged after two consecutive negative results on the PCR test on Post Operative Day (POD)-10. Retrovesical dedifferentiated liposarcoma is rare and considered as high-grade liposarcoma. Although surgery may exacerbate COVID-19 infection, surgical resection of symptomatic high-grade sarcoma is prioritised and performed as soon as no infection detected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Liposarcoma , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms , Pelvic Neoplasms , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Surgical Procedures, Operative/methods , Urinary Retention , COVID-19/therapy , Chemoradiotherapy, Adjuvant/methods , Dissection/methods , Humans , Liposarcoma/pathology , Liposarcoma/physiopathology , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Grading , Pelvic Neoplasms/pathology , Pelvic Neoplasms/physiopathology , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome , Urinary Retention/diagnosis , Urinary Retention/etiology
6.
Eur Urol Focus ; 6(5): 1049-1057, 2020 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597672

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has changed standard urology practice around the world. The situation is affecting not only uro-oncological patients but also patients with benign and disabling conditions who are suffering delays in medical attention that impact their quality of life. OBJECTIVE: To propose, based on expert advice and current evidence where available, a strategy to reorganize female and functional urological (FFU) activity (diagnosis and treatment). EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The present document is based on a narrative review of the limited data available in the urological literature on SARS-Cov-2 and the experience of FFU experts from several countries around the world. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: In all the treatment schemes proposed in the literature on the COVID-19 pandemic, FFU surgery is not adequately covered and usually grouped into the category that is not urgent or can be delayed, but in a sustained pandemic scenario there are cases that cannot be delayed that should be considered for surgery as a priority. The aim of this document is to provide a detailed management plan for noninvasive and invasive FFU consultations, investigations, and operations. A classification of FFU surgical activity by indication and urgency is proposed, as well as recommendations adopted from the literature for good surgical practice and by surgical approach in FFU in the COVID-19 era. CONCLUSIONS: Functional, benign, and pelvic floor conditions have often been considered suitable for delay in challenging times. The long-term implications of this reduction in functional urology clinical activity are currently unknown. This document will help functional urology departments to reorganize their activity to best serve their patients. PATIENT SUMMARY: Many patients will suffer delays in urology treatment because of COVID-19, with consequent impairment of their physical and psychological health and deterioration of their quality of life. Efforts should be made to minimize the burden for this patient group, without endangering patients and health care workers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine , Urologic Diseases/diagnosis , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/methods , Ambulatory Care , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cystitis, Interstitial/diagnosis , Cystitis, Interstitial/therapy , Disease Management , Female , Humans , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis , Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/therapy , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Urinary Incontinence/diagnosis , Urinary Incontinence/therapy , Urinary Retention/diagnosis , Urinary Retention/therapy , Urinary Tract Infections/diagnosis , Urinary Tract Infections/therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Vesicovaginal Fistula/diagnosis , Vesicovaginal Fistula/therapy
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