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1.
Investig Clin Urol ; 63(1): 1-2, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780168
2.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 71(12): 2799-2801, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687951

ABSTRACT

Since the declaration of the Covid-19 pandemic in March 2020, several teaching institutions started the process of adjusting to the new challenge. Medical education could not be imparted the way it used to be and some new methods had to be taken to adapt to the pandemic. At our institute, an online e-teaching approach was adopted to ensure the continuation of post-graduate medical training. Each week two lectures were recorded and uploaded on the YouTube Channel and shared with the students. This was followed by an MCQ based test using Google forms. Ten lectures were delivered in five weeks to 55 participants. The majority of residents agreed that this activity increased their knowledge of the subject and opted to continue it in future. With the help of short online lectures (< 30 minutes) and online tests (5 MCQs), the learning experience of residents can be enhanced. In future, more online resources can be used to incorporate this method of teaching.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Students, Medical , Urology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Arch Ital Urol Androl ; 93(4): 450-454, 2021 Dec 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622683

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine has been adopted successfully in various urological scenarios. The aim of the present study was to explore attitudes and perceptions by urology residents toward the use of telementoring in the context of residents-faculty physicians communication for patient-related care. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 19 multiple choice questions was designed including three sections: respondents' demographics, attitudes and perceptions towards the use of telementoring. Invitations to participate in this anonymous survey were e-mailed to urology residents at University of Naples Federico II. RESULTS: In total 60 responses were received (participation rate 86%). The frequency of telementoring use was described as occasional, frequent, very frequent, and rare by 51,3%, 41.0%, 5,1%, and 2,6% of respondents, respectively. WhatsApp messenger was used by 89.5% of respondents and photos were the most common type of media content shared (73.7%). Most of respondents declared a moderate and a strong agreement with respect to the utility of telementoring in improving the communication in relation to the interpretation of clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and functional findings. Overall, 78% of participants individuated risks of information flow distortions and misinterpretations as the major limit of telementoring. CONCLUSIONS: The use of telementoring is widespread and perceived as useful by urology residents in the context of residentsfaculty physicians communication in multiple settings of patientrelated care.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Physicians , Urology , Attitude , Communication , Faculty , Humans , Referral and Consultation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urology/education
4.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 41(2): 643-649, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616037

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a massive cutdown in outpatient urological investigations, procedures, and interventions. Female and functional urology (FFU) has been probably the most affected subspecialty in urology. Several scientific societies have published guidelines to manage this new situation, providing general recommendations. The aim of this study was to devise a robust questionnaire covering every different aspect of FFU to obtain recommendations on COVID-19 adaptations. METHODS: Delphi methodology was adapted to devise the survey questionnaires for male/female lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), pelvic organ prolapse (POP), chronic pelvic pain (CPP), and neuro-urological disease. Content validity, face validity, and internal consistence were assessed to establish the final questionnaire. This study was ethically approved by the Local Research Ethics Committee. RESULTS: A total 97, 59, 79, 85, and 84 items for female and male LUTS, POPs, CPP, and neuro-urology respectively were approved by the participants. Content validity over 0.70 was obtained which seemed reasonable content validity scores. Internal consistency obtains values of Cronbach's alpha was between 0.70 and 0.90 which was acceptable. CONCLUSIONS: The collective wisdom obtained through a global survey using validated questionnaires covering every different aspect of FFU patient management is necessary. We have developed a robust and validated tool consisting of five questionnaires covering the most prevalent pathologies in FFU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urology , Female , Humans , Male , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods
5.
6.
Curr Opin Urol ; 32(2): 152-157, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592004

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review article is to discuss the impact of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the evolution of telemedicine use for urology office visits. RECENT FINDINGS: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a dramatic change in the delivery of healthcare. Fraught with numerous barriers previously, the need for healthcare delivery during a time of social distancing and increased healthcare requirements drove the adoption of telemedicine forward. This 'trial period' over the last year has allowed us to appreciate the potential utility of telehealth-associated services in practice and consider its role even after the pandemic. Multiple studies equating its utility to in-person visits whereas simultaneously providing added convenience and cost-related savings have been published in the urologic literature. Permanent regulatory changes will need to be implemented to allow us the flexibility to use telehealth in the future. SUMMARY: It is clear that telemedicine is an effective strategy for delivery of healthcare under the right circumstances. Although it initially started to fill a need out of necessity, it can help us effectively deliver healthcare as long as the regulations surrounding telemedicine allow us to continue to use it. This period has been challenging for healthcare delivery and led to policy changes that served as a catalyst to help us better understand this previously underutilized resource.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Urology , Humans , Office Visits , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Curr Urol Rep ; 22(12): 57, 2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575457

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This paper aims to discuss the growth of social media in urology over time, focusing on medical education platforms and best practices. RECENT FINDINGS: Social medial has facilitated physician and patient knowledge acquisition, conference participation, and mentorship. Several social media best practice statements are available, including from the American Urologic Association (AUA) and The European Association of Urology (EAU), to help ensure responsible use. The role of social media in urologic medical education has been amplified by the COVID-19 pandemic. Its utilization by urologists has been expanding, making it very valuable for physician and patient education. Future research should focus on ways to maximize these medical education efforts, minimize risks, and increase guideline awareness among users.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Social Media , Urology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Curr Urol Rep ; 22(12): 66, 2021 Dec 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574874

ABSTRACT

REASON FOR REVIEW: A recent shift towards use of telehealth and remote learning has significant implications on resident and fellow education in urology. Implementation of multi-institutional online didactic programs, spurred on by the COVID epidemic, has changed the traditional resident teaching paradigm from individual institutional silos of knowledge and expertise to a shared nationwide database of learning.  RECENT FINDINGS: In this article, we explore the current trend towards virtual education and its progress to date, lessons learned on the optimization of this teaching modality, and future direction and sustainability of collaborated, standardized and accessible didactic education in urology. Multi-institutional collaborative remote video didactics has emerged as a critical part of resident education. These lectures have been overwhelmingly successful and have persisted beyond the pandemic to become a part of the urologic training curricula. This collaborative and standardized approach to resident education provides access to national and international experts, encourages cross-institutional collaboration and discussion, and builds a repository of lectures with easy access for learners. Utilization of this teaching modality will continue to be impactful in urologic training and will require ongoing efforts and input from both collaborating intuitions and professional societies to continue to improve on and engage in this important learning tool.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Interdisciplinary Placement , Urology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Urology/education
10.
BJU Int ; 125(6): 749, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556518
11.
Prog Urol ; 31(16): 1133-1138, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540915

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a serious environmental issue. The healthcare sector is an important emitter of GHGs. Our aim was to assess the environmental cost of teleconsultations in urology compared to face-to-face consultations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective study of all patients who had a remote teleconsultation over a 2-week period during COVID-19 pandemic. Main outcome was the reduction in CO2e emissions related to teleconsultation compared to face-to-face consultation and was calculated as: total teleconsultation CO2e emissions-total face-to-face consultation CO2e emissions. Secondary outcome measures were the reduction in travel distance and travel time related to teleconsultation. RESULTS: Eighty patients were included. Face-to-face consultations would have resulted in 6699km (4162 miles) of travel (83.7km (52 miles) per patient). Cars were the usual means of transport. CO2e avoided due to lack of travel was calculated at 1.1 tonnes. Teleconsultation was responsible for 1.1kg CO2e while face-to-face consultation emitted 0.5kg of CO2e. Overall, the total reduction in GHGs with teleconsultation was 1141kg CO2e, representing a 99% decrease in emissions. Total savings on transport were 974 € and savings on travel time were 112h (1.4h/patient). CONCLUSIONS: Teleconsultation reduces the environmental impact of face-to-face consultations. The use of teleconsultation in our urology departments resulted in the avoidance of more than 6000km of travel, equivalent to a reduction of 1.1 tonnes of CO2e. Teleconsultation should be considered for specific indications as the healthcare system attempts to become greener. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Environment , Remote Consultation , Urology/organization & administration , Aged , Air Pollutants/analysis , Automobiles , Carbon Footprint/statistics & numerical data , Costs and Cost Analysis , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , France/epidemiology , Greenhouse Gases/analysis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Population Density , Remote Consultation/economics , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Residence Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Urology/economics , Urology/methods
15.
J Pediatr Urol ; 17(4): 571-572, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466730

Subject(s)
Urology , Child , Humans
16.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(12): e14965, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462805

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aims of this research were to analyse the urological literature published during the COVID-19 pandemic and to guide future research. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between 2019 and 2021, the Web of Science (WoS) All Databases collection was searched for publications related to COVID-19 and Urology. The keywords used during this search were coronavirus-19, COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, novel coronavirus, 2019-nCoV, pandemic and/or urology. The top 50 cited (T50) publications were also identified and summarized. Exported Microsoft Excel files, Visualization of Similarities viewer (VOSviewer) software and descriptive assessment were used for bibliometric and statistical analyses of the publications. RESULTS: In total, 582 publications related to COVID-19 and urology were identified. In these publications, the most active author, journal, country and organisation were Francesco Porpiglia, European Urology, the United States of America (USA) and La Paz University Hospital, respectively. The most commonly used keywords were telemedicine-telehealth, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, pandemic, residency, testicle, semen, kidney transplantation, endourology and surgery. The most worrying issues in the articles are the negative impact of COVID-19 on resident training and permanent damage to urological organs. CONCLUSIONS: We analysed all the articles related to COVID-19 and urology published to date in the WoS All Databases collection. The most commonly published articles were based on clinical and outpatient practice, telemedicine, residency training, transplantation, and testicles. The long-term adverse effects of the pandemic on urology practice and especially urological organs will need to be assessed further in future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urology , Bibliometrics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
17.
Urology ; 159: 22-27, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457368

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To define urology applicant attitudes and usage trends of social media (SM) during the 2021 urology match cycle. METHODS: We emailed an anonymous, de-identified 22-question, multiple choice survey to all applicants to our institution for the 2021 Urology Residency Match. We asked participants about use of SM and which aspects they found useful in the application process. Univariate descriptive analyses were conducted based on survey responses. Chi-square analyses were performed to define significant differences in use of social media and resultant match outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 528 students who registered for the 2021 AUA Match, 398 received our survey (75%), and 144 responded (27% of applicants nationwide). Of survey participants, 49% made a new account on Twitter while 30% had a preexisting account. Most participants (71%) had a preexisting Instagram account, while only 3% made a new account. Most participants agreed Twitter was used as a source to gather information about programs (84%) and learn about events (89%). Participants found SM most helpful for announcing event dates (71%) and highlighting resident social life (59%). Applicants did not match more highly on their rank lists if they used Twitter (P = .427) or Instagram (P = .166) and were not more likely to get more interviews if they used Twitter (P = .246) or Instagram (P = .114) CONCLUSION: Applicants found Twitter to be an important source of information through the virtual interview process. Despite the use of SM by most applicants, published content did not impact rank list decisions nor did SM engagement predict match outcomes.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Job Application , Social Media , Urology/education , Female , Humans , Male
18.
J Pediatr Urol ; 18(1): 17-22, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457212

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine has bridged the distance gap between patients and pediatric urologists for over a decade, yet many pediatric urologists have not embraced it as a major part of their practice. The purpose of this systematic review is to evaluate and clarify the optimal role of telemedicine in pediatric urology, as well as the benefits, barriers, risks, and other important considerations that must be accounted for in its optimal adoption. METHODS: Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, this systematic review utilized Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) to search PubMed through April 29, 2021 as follows: (Humans [MeSH]) AND ((Child [MeSH]) OR (Infant [MeSH])) AND ((Remote Consultation [MAJR]) OR (Telemedicine [MAJR]) OR (Videoconferencing [MAJR]) OR (Health Services Accessibility [MAJR])) AND ((Urology [MAJR]) OR (Postoperative Care [MAJR]) OR (Urologic Surgical Procedures [MAJR])). 73 resulting articles, plus 21 from manual searches (e.g. papers too recent to have MeSH terms), were screened. 17 met inclusion criteria by discussing telemedicine in context of pediatric urology in a full manuscript. Non-complete manuscripts and papers not specifically considering pediatric urology, or in which telemedicine was not a major focus, were excluded. RESULTS: 17 papers met inclusion criteria. Varied approaches to the topic included surveys, controlled studies, retrospective studies, and descriptive opinion pieces. Quality of evidence varied, representing at least 1851 virtual encounters, 409 in-person encounters, and 68 clinician opinions. Four papers included a comparison or control group, and none utilized randomization. All 17 papers support expanded application of telemedicine in pediatric urology with varied evidence that telemedicine improves patient access to pediatric urologic care, satisfies both patient families and clinicians, is safe, provides equivalent outcomes, and is practicable. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of telemedicine in pediatric urology should be expanded as it can practicably and safely improve patient access to pediatric urologic care, satisfy both patient families and clinicians, and maintain outcomes.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine , Urology , Child , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infant , Retrospective Studies , Urologists
20.
Int Braz J Urol ; 48(1): 202-203, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413795
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