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1.
J Urol ; 206(6): 1469-1479, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410198

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We examined changes in urological care delivery due to COVID-19 in the U.S. based on patient, practice, and local/regional demographic and pandemic response features. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed real-world data from the American Urological Association Quality (AQUA) Registry collected from electronic health record systems. Data represented 157 outpatient urological practices and 3,165 providers across 48 U.S. states and territories, including 3,297,721 unique patients, 12,488,831 total outpatient visits and 2,194,456 procedures. The primary outcome measure was the number of outpatient visits and procedures performed (inpatient or outpatient) per practice per week, measured from January 2019 to February 2021. RESULTS: We found large (>50%) declines in outpatient visits from March 2020 to April 2020 across patient demographic groups and states, regardless of timing of state stay-at-home orders. Nonurgent outpatient visits decreased more across various nonurgent procedures (49%-59%) than for procedures performed for potentially urgent diagnoses (38%-52%); surgical procedures for nonurgent conditions also decreased more (43%-79%) than those for potentially urgent conditions (43%-53%). African American patients had similar decreases in outpatient visits compared with Asians and Caucasians, but also slower recoveries back to baseline. Medicare-insured patients had the steepest declines (55%), while those on Medicaid and government insurance had the lowest percentage of recovery to baseline (73% and 69%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides real-world evidence on the decline in urological care across demographic groups and practice settings, and demonstrates a differential impact on the utilization of urological health services by demographics and procedure type.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , United States/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Urology/standards , Urology/trends , Young Adult
2.
Urology ; 156: 110-116, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331280

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine differences between telephone and video-televisits and identify whether visit modality is associated with satisfaction in an urban, academic general urology practice. METHODS: A cross sectional analysis of patients who completed a televisit at our urology practice (summer 2020) was performed. A Likert-based satisfaction telephone survey was offered to patients within 7 days of their televisit. Patient demographics, televisit modality (telephone vs video), and outcomes of the visit (eg follow-up visit scheduled, orders placed) were retrospectively abstracted from each chart and compared between the telephone and video cohorts. Multivariate regression analysis was used to evaluate variables associated with satisfaction while controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 269 patients were analyzed. 73% (196/269) completed a telephone televisit. Compared to the video cohort, the telephone cohort was slightly older (mean 58.8 years vs. 54.2 years, P = .03). There were no significant differences in the frequency of orders placed for medication changes, labs, imaging, or for in-person follow-up visits within 30 days between cohorts. Survey results showed overall 84.7% patients were satisfied, and there was no significant difference between the telephone and video cohorts. Visit type was not associated with satisfaction on multivariable analyses, while use of an interpreter [OR:8.13 (1.00-65.94); P = .05], labs ordered [OR:2.74 (1.12-6.70); P = .03] and female patient gender [OR:2.28 (1.03-5.03); P = .04] were significantly associated with satisfaction. CONCLUSION: Overall, most patients were satisfied with their televisit. Additionally, telephone- and video-televisits were similar regarding patient opinions, patient characteristics, and visit outcome. Efforts to increase access and coverage of telehealth, particularly telephone-televisits, should continue past the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Telephone , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing , Adolescent , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Asian Americans/statistics & numerical data , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Communication Barriers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Institutional Practice/statistics & numerical data , Language , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction/ethnology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Smoking , Surveys and Questionnaires , Transportation , Urban Population/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
3.
Scand J Urol ; 55(3): 177-183, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223275

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In March-April 2020, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic lockdown in Denmark, the Danish Health Authorities recommended that, where possible, face-to-face patient-physician consultations be replaced by telephone consultations. The aim of this study was to obtain patients' evaluation of their telemedicine experience. METHODS: Patients who were candidates for telemedicine consultations were recruited based on their urological ailment, necessity for follow-up and comorbidity. New referrals including patients with suspicion of cancer were not candidates for telemedicine. In total, 548 patients had their appointment altered during the period from 13 March to 30 April 2020. Postal questionnaires were sent to 548 patients and 300 (54.7%) replied. RESULTS: In total, 280 patient answered, 224 (80%) men and 56 (20%) women, mean age 69 years (range 18-91) of whom 180 (64.3%) had a benign and 100 (35.7%) a malignant diagnosis. Twenty (6.7%) respondents did not remember their telephone consultation and were therefore excluded. Telephone consultation satisfaction was reported by 230 (85.0%) patients, but they would not prefer video consultations over telephone consultations, and only 102 (36.4%) would prefer telephone consultations in the future. Patients' age, sex and distance to the hospital did not seem to be associated with telephone consultation satisfaction (age p = 0.17; sex p = 0.99; distance p = 0.27, respectively). In total, 226 (80.7%) were medically assessed as being at risk for COVID, but 74 (26.4%) subjectively evaluated themselves as being at risk. CONCLUSIONS: In general (85.0%), urological patients were satisfied with telephone consultations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Denmark , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Office Visits , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/methods , Videoconferencing , Young Adult
4.
Int Braz J Urol ; 47(2): 378-385, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127858

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has dramatic effects on individuals and health care systems. In our institute, a tertiary oncologic public hospital with high surgical volume, we prioritize maintaining cancer treatment as well as possible. The aim of this study is to evaluate if uro-oncological surgeries at pandemic are safe. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated patients who underwent uro-oncological procedures. Epidemiological data, information on COVID-19 infection related to surgery and clinical characteristics of non-survival operative patients with COVID-19 infections were analyzed. RESULTS: From 213 patients analyzed, Covid-19 symptoms were noticed in 8 patients at preoperative process or at hospital admission postponing operation; 161 patients were submitted to elective surgery and 44 to emergency surgery. From patients submitted to elective surgeries, we had 1 patient with laboratory confirmation of COVID-19 (0,6%), with mild symptoms and quick discharge. From the urgencies group, we had 6(13%)patients tested positive; 5 were taken to ICU with 4 deaths. CONCLUSION: Elective uro-oncological procedures at the COVID-19 epidemic period in a COVID-19-free Institute are safe, and patients who need urgent procedures, with a long period of hospitalization, need special care to avoid COVID-19 infection and its outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Surgical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , Humans
5.
Hong Kong Med J ; 27(4): 258-265, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106524

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The objective was to investigate the changes in urology practice during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic with a perspective from our experience with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. METHODS: Institutional data from all urology centres in the Hong Kong public sector during the COVID-19 pandemic (1 Feb 2020-31 Mar 2020) and a non-COVID-19 control period (1 Feb 2019-31 Mar 2019) were acquired. An online anonymous questionnaire was used to gauge the impact of COVID-19 on resident training. The clinical output of tertiary centres was compared with data from the SARS period. RESULTS: The numbers of operating sessions, clinic attendance, cystoscopy sessions, prostate biopsy, and shockwave lithotripsy sessions were reduced by 40.5%, 28.5%, 49.6%, 44.8%, and 38.5%, respectively, across all the centres reviewed. The mean numbers of operating sessions before and during the COVID-19 pandemic were 85.1±30.3 and 50.6±25.7, respectively (P=0.005). All centres gave priority to cancer-related surgeries. Benign prostatic hyperplasia-related surgery (39.1%) and ureteric stone surgery (25.5%) were the most commonly delayed surgeries. The degree of reduction in urology services was less than that during SARS (47.2%, 55.3%, and 70.5% for operating sessions, cystoscopy, and biopsy, respectively). The mean numbers of operations performed by residents before and during the COVID-19 pandemic were 75.4±48.0 and 34.9±17.2, respectively (P=0.002). CONCLUSION: A comprehensive review of urology practice during the COVID-19 pandemic revealed changes in every aspect of practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Internship and Residency , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Urology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Organizational Innovation , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urology/education , Urology/statistics & numerical data
6.
Urologia ; 88(1): 3-8, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105635

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically hit all Europe and Northern Italy in particular. The reallocation of medical resources has caused a sharp reduction in the activity of many medical disciplines, including urology. The restricted availability of resources is expected to cause a delay in the treatment of urological cancers and to negatively influence the clinical history of many cancer patients. In this study, we describe COVID-19 impact on uro-oncological management in Piedmont/Valle d'Aosta, estimating its future impact. METHODS: We performed an online survey in 12 urological centers, belonging to the Oncological Network of Piedmont/Valle d'Aosta, to estimate the impact of COVID-19 emergency on their practice. On this basis, we then estimated the medical working capacity needed to absorb all postponed uro-oncological procedures. RESULTS: Most centers (77%) declared to be "much"/"very much" affected by COVID-19 emergency. If uro-oncological consultations for newly diagnosed cancers were often maintained, follow-up consultations were more than halved or even suspended in around two out of three centers. In-office and day-hospital procedures were generally only mildly reduced, whereas major uro-oncological procedures were more than halved or even suspended in 60% of centers. To clear waiting list backlog, the urological working capacity should dramatically increase in the next months; delays greater than 1 month are expected for more than 50% of uro-oncological procedures. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 emergency has dramatically slowed down uro-oncological activity in Piedmont and Valle d'Aosta. Ideally, uro-oncological patients should be referred to COVID-19-free tertiary urological centers to ensure a timely management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care , Health Services Accessibility , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Appointments and Schedules , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Kidney Neoplasms/epidemiology , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/surgery , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/epidemiology , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery , Urologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Urologic Neoplasms/surgery , Urology/organization & administration
7.
Urology ; 153: 35-41, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate patient satisfaction with telemedicine appointments as an alternative to in-person appointments at an Andrology-focused academic urology practice during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: Between March and June 2020, all appointments at the practice of a single Andrology-focused academic urologist were conducted by telephone. Consecutive patients were contacted by telephone following their appointment to complete a telephone questionnaire. Baseline demographic information was obtained, and perceptions regarding telephone appointments were assessed using a Likert scale. RESULTS: Ninety-six patients completed the telephone questionnaire. Median age was 48.5 years (interquartile range 37.3-62.8 years) with 55 of 96 (57.3%) of the appointments Andrology-focused. Mean distance of residence from the hospital was 8.4 km (interquartile range 4.7-25.2 km). Only 9 of 96 (9.3%) of the patients felt that the telephone format did not adequately address their needs. However, 26 of 96 (27.1%) of patients said they would prefer an in-person appointment. On multivariable analysis adjusting for age, gender, presenting complaint, type of appointment, education level, and employment status, no factors were associated with feeling that the telephone appointment adequately addressed needs or preference for an in-person appointment in the future. CONCLUSION: Patients were generally satisfied with telephone appointments as an alternative to in-person appointments during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Nonetheless, a substantial portion of patients said they would prefer in-person appointments in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Office Visits , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Andrology , Employment , Female , Female Urogenital Diseases/therapy , Humans , Male , Male Urogenital Diseases/therapy , Middle Aged , Office Visits/economics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
9.
Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) ; 45(1): 39-48, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917182

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 outbreak has substantially altered residents' training activities. While several new virtual learning programs have been recently implemented, the perspective of urology trainees regarding their usefulness still needs to be investigated. METHODS: A cross-sectional, 30-item, web-based Survey was conducted through Twitter from April 4th, 2020 to April 18th, 2020, aiming to evaluate the urology residents' perspective on smart learning (SL) modalities (pre-recorded videos, webinars, podcasts, and social media [SoMe]), and contents (frontal lessons, clinical case discussions, updates on Guidelines and on clinical trials, surgical videos, Journal Clubs, and seminars on leadership and non-technical skills). RESULTS: Overall, 501 urology residents from 58 countries completed the survey. Of these, 78.4, 78.2, 56.9 and 51.9% of them considered pre-recorded videos, interactive webinars, podcasts and SoMe highly useful modalities of smart learning, respectively. The contents considered as highly useful by the greatest proportion of residents were updates on guidelines (84.8%) and surgical videos (81.0%). In addition, 58.9 and 56.5% of responders deemed seminars on leadership and on non-technical skills highly useful smart learning contents. The three preferred combinations of smart learning modality and content were: pre-recorded surgical videos, interactive webinars on clinical cases, and pre-recorded videos on guidelines. CONCLUSION: Our study provides the first global «big picture¼ of the smart learning modalities and contents that should be prioritized to optimize virtual Urology education. While this survey was conducted during the COVID-19 outbreak, our findings might have even more impact in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/methods , Internship and Residency , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Urology/education , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , General Surgery/education , Humans , Internationality , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Webcasts as Topic
10.
Urol J ; 17(6): 677-679, 2020 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-914927

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on urology practice in Indonesia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using web-based questionnaire (Survey Monkey), which was distributed and collected within a period of three weeks. All practicing urologists in Indonesia were sent an e-questionnaire link via E-mail, WhatsApp Messenger application, and/or short message service, and the chief of residents in each urology centre distributed the e-questionnaire to urology residents. RESULTS: The response rate was 369/485 (76%) among urologists and 220/220 (100%) among urology residents. Less than 10 percent of the responses in each section were incomplete. There are 35/369 (9.5%) of urologists and 59/220 (26.8%) of urology residents had been suspected as COVID-19 patients, of whom seven of them were confirmed to be COVID-19 positive. The majority of urologists (66%) preferred to continue face-to-face consultations with a limited number of patients, and more than 60% of urologists preferred to postpone the majority (66%) or all elective surgery. Most urologists also chose to postpone elective surgery in patient with COVID-19-related symptoms and patient who required post-operative ICU-care. Urologist and urology residents reported high rates of using personal protective equipment, except for medical gowns and N95 masks, which were in short supply. Several uro-oncology surgeries were considered to be the top priority for Indonesian urologist during COVID-19 epidemic period. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a decline in urology service in both outpatient clinic and surgery services with uro-oncological procedure as a priority to conduct.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Private/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Public/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Laparoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Urologists/statistics & numerical data , Urology/education , Urology/organization & administration , Young Adult
11.
Eur Urol ; 78(6): 777-778, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-831767

ABSTRACT

Delayed evaluation and/or treatment for urolithiasis during the COVID-19 pandemic provide a unique opportunity to organically reassess many well-established stone management strategies. Nonopioid analgesia for renal colic and spontaneous passage trials appear to be two avenues worthy of investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Renal Colic/drug therapy , Urolithiasis/therapy , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Analgesics, Opioid/therapeutic use , Humans , Medical Overuse , Renal Colic/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care , Texas/epidemiology , Urolithiasis/complications , Urology/methods
12.
Urology ; 146: 36-42, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811777

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To capture the perspective of prospective urology applicants experiencing unique challenges in the context of COVID-19. METHODS: A voluntary, anonymous survey was distributed online, assessing the impact of COVID-19 on a large sample of US medical students planning to apply to urology residencies. Themes of (1) specialty discernment, (2) alterations to medical education, and (3) the residency application process were explored. RESULTS: A total of 238 medical students, 87% third and fourth years, responded to the survey. While 85% indicated that the pandemic had not deterred their specialty choice, they noted substantial impacts on education, including 82% reporting decreased exposure to urology. Nearly half of students reported changes to required rotations and 35% reported changes to urology-specific rotations at their home institutions. Students shared concerns about suspending in-person experiences, including the impact on letters of recommendation (68% "very concerned) and program choice (73% "very concerned"). Looking to the possibility of virtual interactions, students identified the importance of small group and one-on-one communication with residents (83% "very important") and opportunities to learn about hospital facilities (72% "very important"). CONCLUSION: Despite the impacts of COVID-19 on medical education, prospective urology applicants appear to remain confident in their specialty choice. Students' biggest concerns involve disruption of away rotations, including impacts on obtaining letters of recommendation and choosing a residency program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Urology/education , Career Choice , Humans , Internet , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Job Application , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Urology/standards , Urology/statistics & numerical data
15.
Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) ; 44(9): 604-610, 2020 Nov.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741000

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the activity the Urology Department of a Portuguese Academic Hospital during the state of emergency and the equivalent period at the previous year. We compared the number of elective consultations and diagnostic urologic examinations, number and type of elective surgeries, as well as patients' demographic characteristics and main causes of presentation to Urology Emergency Department (ED) during the two mentioned periods MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from 691 patients coming to emergency department were collected from institutional clinical software from March 18 th 2020 to May 2 nd 2020 - and from the same period the previous year. Data collected were age, sex, day of the presentation to Emergency Department, referral from other hospitals, triage color, reason of admission, diagnosis of discharge, and the need for emergency surgery or hospitalization. In order to identify associations between demographic and clinical variables with having been submitted to an emergency surgery (outcome), logistic regression models were applied. RESULTS: Multivariable analysis showed an association of sex with being submitted to surgery, 65.6% decrease in the odds for the male gender. The period (COVID versus non-COVID) did not show a significant association with surgery. CONCLUSION: Our department experienced a noticeable activity reduction. We also observe a reduction in urgent causes to attend the ED considered less serious. The percentage of cases requiring emergency surgery and hospitalization was higher during COVID-period.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Diagnostic Techniques, Urological/statistics & numerical data , Diagnostic Techniques, Urological/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , Hospitals, University , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Portugal/epidemiology , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Tertiary Care Centers , Triage/methods , Urologic Diseases/epidemiology , Urology/trends
17.
ESMO Open ; 5(Suppl 3)2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-646077

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus pandemic has provoked discussions among healthcare providers how to manage cancer patients when faced with the threat of severe acute respiratory syndrome related coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) containing regimens are standard of care in the majority of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC) patients. It remains unclear whether therapies should be modified in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We performed an online survey among physicians involved in the treatment of mccRCC, and 41 experts responded. Questions focused on criteria relevant for treatment decision outside the pandemic and the modifications of systemic therapy during COVID-19. FINDINGS: For the majority of experts (73%), the combination of International metastatic renal cell carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) risk category and patient fitness are two important factors for decision-making. The main treatment choice in fit, favourable risk patients outside the pandemic is pembrolizumab/axitinib for 53%, avelumab/axitinib, sunitinib or pazopanib for 13% of experts each. During the pandemic, ICI-containing regimens are chosen less often in favour of a tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) monotherapy, mainly sunitinib or pazopanib (35%).In fit, intermediate/poor-risk patients outside the pandemic, over 80% of experts choose ipilimumab/nivolumab, in contrast to only 41% of physicians during COVID-19, instead more TKI monotherapies are given. In patients responding to established therapies with ICI/ICI or ICI/TKI combinations, most participants modify treatment regimen by extending cycle length, holding one ICI or even both. CONCLUSION: mccRCC treatment modifications in light of the coronavirus pandemic are variable, with a shift from ICI/ICI to ICI/TKI or TKI monotherapy.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Kidney Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/secondary , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Protein Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Urology/statistics & numerical data
18.
Int Braz J Urol ; 46(6): 1042-1071, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601795

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on clinical practice, income, health and lifestyle behavior of Brazilian urologists during the month of April 2020. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 39-question, web-based survey was sent to all urologist members of the Brazilian Society of Urology. We assessed socio-demographic, professional, health and behavior parameters. The primary goal was to evaluate changes in urologists' clinical practice and income after two months of COVID-19. We also looked at geographical differences based on the incidence rates of COVID-19 in different states. RESULTS: Among 766 urologists who completed the survey, a reduction ≥ 50% of patient visits, elective and emergency surgeries was reported by 83.2%, 89.6% and 54.8%, respectively. An income reduction of ≥ 50% was reported by 54.3%. Measures to reduce costs were implemented by most. Video consultations were performed by 38.7%. Modifications in health and lifestyle included weight gain (32.9%), reduced physical activity (60.0%), increased alcoholic intake (39.9%) and reduced sexual activity (34.9%). Finally, 13.5% of Brazilian urologists were infected with SARS-CoV-2 and about one third required hospitalization. Urologists from the highest COVID-19 incidence states were at a higher risk to have a reduction of patient visits and non-essential surgeries (OR=2.95, 95% CI 1.86 - 4.75; p< 0.0001) and of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 (OR=4.36 95%CI 1.74-10.54, p=0.012). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 produced massive disturbances in Brazilian urologists' practice, with major reductions in patient visits and surgical procedures. Distressing consequences were also observed on physicians' income, health and personal lives. These findings are probably applicable to other medical specialties.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Life Style , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologists/psychology , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Workload , Brazil , COVID-19 , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Urologic Diseases/complications , Urologic Diseases/epidemiology , Urologists/statistics & numerical data
19.
Eur Urol ; 78(2): 265-275, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-598126

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) declared coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) as a pandemic on March 11, 2020. The impact of COVID-19 on urological services in different geographical areas is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the global impact of COVID-19 on urological providers and the provision of urological patient care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted from March 30, 2020 to April 7, 2020. A 55-item questionnaire was developed to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on various aspects of urological services. Target respondents were practising urologists, urology trainees, and urology nurses/advanced practice providers. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The primary outcome was the degree of reduction in urological services, which was further stratified by the geographical location, degree of outbreak, and nature and urgency of urological conditions. The secondary outcome was the duration of delay in urological services. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: A total of 1004 participants responded to our survey, and they were mostly based in Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. Worldwide, 41% of the respondents reported that their hospital staff members had been diagnosed with COVID-19 infection, 27% reported personnel shortage, and 26% had to be deployed to take care of COVID-19 patients. Globally, only 33% of the respondents felt that they were given adequate personal protective equipment, and many providers expressed fear of going to work (47%). It was of concerning that 13% of the respondents were advised not to wear a surgical face mask for the fear of scaring their patients, and 21% of the respondents were advised not to discuss COVID-19 issues or concerns on media. COVID-19 had a global impact on the cut-down of urological services, including outpatient clinic appointments, outpatient investigations and procedures, and urological surgeries. The degree of cut-down of urological services increased with the degree of COVID-19 outbreak. On average, 28% of outpatient clinics, 30% of outpatient investigations and procedures, and 31% of urological surgeries had a delay of >8 wk. Urological services for benign conditions were more affected than those for malignant conditions. Finally, 47% of the respondents believed that the accumulated workload could be dealt with in a timely manner after the COVID-19 outbreak, but 50% thought the postponement of urological services would affect the treatment and survival outcomes of their patients. One of the limitations of this study is that Africa, Australia, and New Zealand were under-represented. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 had a profound global impact on urological care and urology providers. The degree of cut-down of urological services increased with the degree of COVID-19 outbreak and was greater for benign than for malignant conditions. One-fourth of urological providers were deployed to assist with COVID-19 care. Many providers reported insufficient personal protective equipment and support from hospital administration. PATIENT SUMMARY: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has led to significant delay in outpatient care and surgery in urology, particularly in regions with the most COVID-19 cases. A considerable proportion of urology health care professionals have been deployed to assist in COVID-19 care, despite the perception of insufficient training and protective equipment.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologists/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Diseases/complications , Urologic Diseases/epidemiology , Workload
20.
Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) ; 44(7): 450-457, 2020 Sep.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-427879

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus has caused tens of thousands of deaths in Spain and has managed to breakdown the healthcare system hospitals in the Community of Madrid, largely due to its tendency to cause severe pneumonia, requiring ventilatory support. This fact has caused our center to collapse, with 130% of its beds occupied by COVID-19 patients, thus causing the absolute cessation of activity of the urology service, the practical disappearance of resident training programs, and the incorporation of a good part of the urology staff into the group of medical personnel attending these patients. In order to recover from this extraordinary level of suspended activity, we will be obliged to prioritize pathologies based on purely clinical criteria, for which tables including the relevance of each pathology within each area of urology are being proposed. Technology tools such as online training courses or surgical simulators may be convenient for the necessary reestablishment of resident education.


Subject(s)
Bed Occupancy/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Bed Conversion/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologists/supply & distribution , Urology/education , Urology/organization & administration , Urology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Ventilators, Mechanical , Withholding Treatment/statistics & numerical data
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