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1.
J Urol ; 206(6): 1469-1479, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410198

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We examined changes in urological care delivery due to COVID-19 in the U.S. based on patient, practice, and local/regional demographic and pandemic response features. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed real-world data from the American Urological Association Quality (AQUA) Registry collected from electronic health record systems. Data represented 157 outpatient urological practices and 3,165 providers across 48 U.S. states and territories, including 3,297,721 unique patients, 12,488,831 total outpatient visits and 2,194,456 procedures. The primary outcome measure was the number of outpatient visits and procedures performed (inpatient or outpatient) per practice per week, measured from January 2019 to February 2021. RESULTS: We found large (>50%) declines in outpatient visits from March 2020 to April 2020 across patient demographic groups and states, regardless of timing of state stay-at-home orders. Nonurgent outpatient visits decreased more across various nonurgent procedures (49%-59%) than for procedures performed for potentially urgent diagnoses (38%-52%); surgical procedures for nonurgent conditions also decreased more (43%-79%) than those for potentially urgent conditions (43%-53%). African American patients had similar decreases in outpatient visits compared with Asians and Caucasians, but also slower recoveries back to baseline. Medicare-insured patients had the steepest declines (55%), while those on Medicaid and government insurance had the lowest percentage of recovery to baseline (73% and 69%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This study provides real-world evidence on the decline in urological care across demographic groups and practice settings, and demonstrates a differential impact on the utilization of urological health services by demographics and procedure type.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ambulatory Care/standards , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , United States/epidemiology , Urologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Urology/standards , Urology/trends , Young Adult
2.
Urol Int ; 105(7-8): 650-656, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216840

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data on the use and concern of telemedicine among German urologists, and thus, there are no established guidelines for telemedical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of urological indications. METHODS: An anonymized survey was conducted among German private practice urologists during the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. The χ2 test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: 257 urologists were included in the final analysis. Thirty-five (14.0%) of urologists had used telemedicine as part of their consultation, and 221 (86.0%) had not used telemedicine. There was no difference between telemedicine adoption rates between rural and urban settings. Telemedicine users were significantly more satisfied with the information they had received regarding telemedicine issues. Users saw the greatest barrier to telemedicine that patients do not take up the offer of telemedicine. Nonusers were most concerned with unclear indications for telemedicine followed by lesser reimbursements during telemedicine than in-person visitations. Users were significantly more likely to use telemedicine beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. Urologists, who wanted to use the service in the future, wanted an active support by the German society of urology and guidelines for telemedicine. Last, users and nonusers preferred telemedicine for non-acute chronic diseases and follow-up visitations. CONCLUSION: Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine remains a rarely used service among German private practice urologists. Ultimately, to overcome the current challenges, urologists require an active support for the service through the German Society of Urology and telemedical guidelines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Private Practice/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urologists/trends , Urology/trends , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Computers , Germany , Health Care Surveys , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Middle Aged , Urologic Diseases/diagnosis
3.
Int Braz J Urol ; 47(2): 251-262, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1127857

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic is a rapidly spreading virus that is changing the World and the way doctors are practicing medicine. The huge number of patients searching for medical care and needing intensive care beds led the health care system to a burnout status especially in places where the care system was already overloaded. In this setting, and also due to the absence of a specific treatment for the disease, health authorities had to opt for recommending or imposing social distancing to relieve the health system and reduce deaths. All other medical specialties non-directly related to the treatment of COVID-19 had to interrupt or strongly reduce their activities in order to give room to seriously ill patients, since no one knows so far the real extent of the virus damage on human body and the consequences of doing non deferrable procedures in this pandemic era. Despite not been a urological disease, the urologist needs to be updated on how to deal with these patients and how to take care of himself and of the medical team he works with. The aim of this article is to review briefly some practical aspects of COVID-19 and its implications in the urological practice in our country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology/trends , Humans
4.
Curr Opin Urol ; 31(2): 109-114, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006101

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe and critically discuss the most recent evidence regarding stone management during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and post-COVID-19 era. RECENT FINDINGS: There is a need to plan for resuming the normal elective stone surgery in the post-COVID era, keeping a clear record of all surgeries that are being deferred and identifying subgroups of surgical priorities, for the de-escalation phase. Telehealth is very useful because it contributes to reduce virus dissemination guaranteeing at the same time an adequate response to patients' care needs. Once the pandemic is over, teleurology will continue to be utilized to offer cost-effective care to urological patients and it will be totally integrated in our clinical practice. SUMMARY: This COVID-19 pandemic represents a real challenge for all national health providers: on the one hand, every effort should be made to assist COVID patients, while on the other hand we must remember that all other diseases have not disappeared in the meanwhile and they will urgently need to be treated as soon as the pandemic is more under control. A correct prioritization of cases when surgical activity will progressively return back to normality is of paramount importance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Decision Making , Telemedicine , Urology/methods , Urology/trends , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Urol Int ; 105(1-2): 17-20, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917825

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 pandemic represents a dramatic challenge for healthcare systems worldwide, and it also affects daily urological practice. After China and Italy, Tessin (Switzerland) has been hit the hardest, due to its close proximity to Lombardy and the high number of frontier workers in the area. Our objective was to share with the scientific community how, during the COVID-19 period, there has been a huge modification in urological emergencies throughout all hospitals included in the Ente Ospedaliero Cantonale (EOC). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed urgent urological consultations requested by the emergency department (ED) of the 4 public hospitals located in Tessin belonging to EOC in the 3-month period between February 15 and May 15, 2020, and compared them to the 2 previous years cases within the same time frame (February 15 to May 15, 2018 and 2019). The number of daily consultations, urgent invasive procedures performed, and admissions were evaluated. RESULTS: The final sample resulted in 594 consultations performed in 2020, 974 in 2018, and 974 in 2019. A higher number of daily consultations were performed during 2018 and 2019. The number of daily admissions dropped consistently during the COVID-19 pandemic (737 vs. 392). CONCLUSIONS: Our multicenter study aimed to quantify changes in urgent urological care in Tessin in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Urgent urology practice was dramatically affected with a remarkable reduction in urgent urological consultations, whereas a higher risk of admissions was observed in 2020, due to the severity of the patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/trends , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urology Department, Hospital/trends , Urology/trends , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Switzerland , Time Factors , Urologic Diseases/diagnosis
6.
Neurourol Urodyn ; 39(6): 1885-1888, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-909474

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic significantly altered our daily life as well as our professional practice. COVID-19 has disrupted our lives both professionally and personally. We know the urological management in a neurogenic patient needs to be tailored to the individual circumstances, this is even more pertinent during these uncertain times. International Continence Society is the premier international organization in functional urology. Lately, it has established an institute to facilitate teaching and training opportunities all over the world. The School of Neurourology teamed with the School of Modern Technology and set up a Webinar-"How to manage the neuro-urological patients in the current pandemic." This was set up as a case-based discussion to deliberate the management of our patients in the present climate and examine the role of modern technology in overcoming the current barriers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine , Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic/therapy , Urology/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Disease Management , Forecasting , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
7.
Urol Oncol ; 38(12): 929.e1-929.e10, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-838829

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Ad-hoc guidelines for managing the COVID-19 pandemic are published worldwide. We investigated international applications of such policies in the urologic-oncology community. METHODS: A 20-item survey was e-mailed via SurveyMonkey to 100 international senior urologic-oncology surgeons. Leaders' policies regarding clinical/surgical management and medical education were surveyed probing demographics, affiliations, urologic-oncologic areas of interest, and current transportation restrictions. Data on COVID-19 burden were retrieved from the ECDC. Statistical analyses employed non-parametric tests (SPSS v.25.0, IBM). RESULTS: Of 100 leaders from 17 countries, 63 responded to our survey, with 58 (92%) reporting university and/or cancer-center affiliations. Policies on new-patient visits remained mostly unchanged, while follow-up visits for low-risk diseases were mostly postponed, for example, 83.3% for small renal mass (SRM). Radical prostatectomy was delayed in 76.2% of cases, while maintaining scheduled timing for radical cystectomy (71.7%). Delays were longer in Europe than in the Americas for kidney cancer (SRM follow-up, P = 0.014), prostate cancer (new visits, P = 0.003), and intravesical therapy for intermediate-risk bladder cancer (P = 0.043). In Europe, COVID-19 burden correlated with policy adaptation, for example, nephrectomy delays for T2 disease (r = 0.5, P =0.005). Regarding education policies, trainees' medical education was mainly unchanged, whereas senior urologists' planned attendance at professional meetings dropped from 6 (IQR 1-11) to 2 (IQR 0-5) (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Under COVID-19, senior urologic-oncology surgeons worldwide apply risk-stratified approaches to timing of clinical and surgical schedules. Policies regarding trainee education were not significantly affected. We suggest establishment of an international consortium to create a directive for coping with such future challenges to global healthcare.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/trends , Urologists/statistics & numerical data , Urology/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Forecasting , Humans , Medical Oncology/education , Medical Oncology/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urologic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Urologic Neoplasms/therapy , Urologists/trends , Urology/education , Urology/standards
8.
Int Braz J Urol ; 46(suppl.1): 215-221, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-818693

ABSTRACT

Known laparoscopic and robotic assisted approaches and techniques for the surgical management of urological malignant and benign diseases are commonly used around the World. During the global pandemic COVID19, urology surgeons had to reorganize their daily surgical practice. A concern with the use of minimally invasive techniques arose due to a proposed risk of viral transmission of the coronavirus disease with the creation of pneumoperitoneum. Due to this, we reviewed the literature to evaluate the use of laparoscopy and robotics during the pandemic COVID19. A literature review of viral transmission in surgery and of the available literature regarding the transmission of the COVID19 virus was performed up to April 30, 2020. We additionally reviewed surgical society guidelines and recommendations regarding surgery during this pandemic. Few studies have been performed on viral transmission during surgery. No study has been made regarding this area during minimally invasive urology cases. To date there is no study that demonstrates or can suggest the ability for a virus to be transmitted during surgical treatment whether open, laparoscopic or robotic. There is no society consensus on restricting laparoscopic or robotic surgery. However, there is expert consensus on modification of standard practices to minimize any risk of transmission. During the pandemic COVID19 we recommend the use of specific personal protective equipment for the surgeon, anesthesiologist and nursing staff in the operating room. Modifications of standard practices during minimally invasive surgery such as using lowest intra-abdominal pressures possible, controlled smoke evacuation systems, and minimizing energy device usage are recommended.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Laparoscopy/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urologic Surgical Procedures/methods , Urologists , Urology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Robotic Surgical Procedures/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Urology/standards , Urology/trends , Workflow
9.
World J Urol ; 39(9): 3151-3160, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-754593

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Contemporary, original research should be utilised to inform guidelines in urology relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. This comprehensive review aimed to: identify all up-to-date original publications relating to urology and COVID-19, characterise where publications were from, and outline what topics were investigated. METHODS: This review utilised a search strategy that assessed five electronic databases, additional grey literature, and global trial registries. All current published, in-press, and pre-print manuscripts were included. Eligible studies were required to be original research articles of any study design, reporting on COVID-19 or urology, in any of study population, intervention, comparison, or outcomes. Included studies were reported in a narrative synthesis format. Data were summarised according to primary reported outcome topic. A world heatmap was generated to represent where included studies originated from. RESULTS: Of the 6617 search results, 48 studies met final inclusion criteria, including 8 pre-prints and 7 ongoing studies from online registries. These studies originated from ten countries according to first author affiliation. Most studies originated from China (n = 13), followed by Italy (n = 12) and USA (n = 11). Topics of the study included pathophysiological, administrative, and clinical fields: translational (n = 14), COVID-19-related outcomes (n = 5), urology training (n = 4), telemedicine (n = 7), equipment and safety (n = 2), urology in general (n = 4), uro-oncology (n = 3), urolithiasis (n = 1), and kidney transplantation (n = 8). CONCLUSION: This review has outlined available original research relevant to COVID-19 and urology from the international community. This summary may serve as a guide for future research priorities in this area.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Medical Oncology , Publishing , Urology , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Global Health , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/methods , Kidney Transplantation/trends , Medical Oncology/methods , Medical Oncology/trends , Publishing/statistics & numerical data , Publishing/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Urology/methods , Urology/trends
10.
World J Urol ; 39(9): 3147-3149, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743719

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the suspension, termination or alteration of thousands of clinical trials as the health emergency escalated globally. Whilst the rapid suspension of certain clinical trials was necessary to ensure the safety of high-risk or vulnerable trial participants as well as healthcare workers, the long-term ramifications that this delay will have on the field of urologic oncology is unknown. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to plan for and implement new strategies to advance our understanding of unmet areas of need in urologic oncology. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the suspension, termination or alteration of thousands of clinical trials as the health emergency escalated globally. Whilst the rapid suspension of certain clinical trials was necessary to ensure the safety of high-risk or vulnerable trial participants as well as healthcare workers, the long-term ramifications that this delay will have on the field of urologic oncology is unknown. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to plan for and implement new strategies to advance our understanding of unmet areas of need in urologic oncology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Medical Oncology , Urology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Change Management , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Clinical Trials as Topic/organization & administration , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Early Termination of Clinical Trials/adverse effects , Early Termination of Clinical Trials/statistics & numerical data , Early Termination of Clinical Trials/trends , Humans , Medical Oncology/methods , Medical Oncology/trends , Needs Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Urology/methods , Urology/trends , Vulnerable Populations
11.
Actas Urol Esp (Engl Ed) ; 44(9): 604-610, 2020 Nov.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741000

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the activity the Urology Department of a Portuguese Academic Hospital during the state of emergency and the equivalent period at the previous year. We compared the number of elective consultations and diagnostic urologic examinations, number and type of elective surgeries, as well as patients' demographic characteristics and main causes of presentation to Urology Emergency Department (ED) during the two mentioned periods MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from 691 patients coming to emergency department were collected from institutional clinical software from March 18 th 2020 to May 2 nd 2020 - and from the same period the previous year. Data collected were age, sex, day of the presentation to Emergency Department, referral from other hospitals, triage color, reason of admission, diagnosis of discharge, and the need for emergency surgery or hospitalization. In order to identify associations between demographic and clinical variables with having been submitted to an emergency surgery (outcome), logistic regression models were applied. RESULTS: Multivariable analysis showed an association of sex with being submitted to surgery, 65.6% decrease in the odds for the male gender. The period (COVID versus non-COVID) did not show a significant association with surgery. CONCLUSION: Our department experienced a noticeable activity reduction. We also observe a reduction in urgent causes to attend the ED considered less serious. The percentage of cases requiring emergency surgery and hospitalization was higher during COVID-period.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Diagnostic Techniques, Urological/statistics & numerical data , Diagnostic Techniques, Urological/trends , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , Hospitals, University , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Portugal/epidemiology , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Tertiary Care Centers , Triage/methods , Urologic Diseases/epidemiology , Urology/trends
14.
Int Braz J Urol ; 46(suppl.1): 156-164, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-630552

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To explore the current situation faced by Latin American urology departments during the COVID-19 Outbreak in terms of knowledge, actions, prioritization of urology practices, and implementation of internal clinical management protocols for inpatients and outpatients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A non-validated, structured, self-administered, electronic survey with 35 closed multiple choice questions was conducted in Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and English and Deutsch versions from April 1st to April 30th, 2020. The survey was distributed through social networks and the official American Confederation of Urology (CAU) website. It was anonymous, mainly addressed to Latin American urologists and urology residents. It included 35 questions exploring different aspects: 1) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and internal management protocols for healthcare providers; 2) Priority surgeries and urological urgencies and 3) Inpatient and outpatient care. RESULTS: Of 864 surveys received, 846 had at least 70% valid responses and were included in the statistical analyses. Surveys corresponded to South America in 62% of the cases, Central America and North America in 29.7%. 12.7% were residents. Regarding to PPE and internal management protocols, 88% confirmed the implementation of specific protocols and 45.4% have not received training to perform a safe clinical practice; only 2.3% reported being infected with COVID-19. 60.9% attended urgent surgeries. The following major uro-oncologic surgeries were reported as high priority: Radical Nephrectomy (RN) 58.4%, and Radical Cystectomy (RC) 57.3%. When we associate the capacity of hospitalization (urologic beds available) and percentage of high-priority surgery performed, we observed that centers with fewer urological beds (10-20) compared to centers with more urological beds (31-40) performed more frequently major urologic cancer surgeries: RN 54.5% vs 60.8% (p=0.0003), RC 53.1% vs 64.9% (p=0.005) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: At the time of writing (May 13th 2020) our data represents a snapshot of COVID-19 outbreak in Latin American urological practices. Our findings have practical implications and should be contextualized considering many factors related to patients and urological care: The variability of health care scenarios, institutional capacity, heterogeneity and burden of urologic disease, impact of surgical indications and decision making when prioritizing and scheduling surgeries in times of COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Latin America , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
15.
Int Braz J Urol ; 46(suppl.1): 201-206, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-630410

ABSTRACT

Proposal: To highlight the indications for emergency surgery during the 2019 Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) that support recommendations published in mid-March 2020 by the American Confederation of Urology on its website. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A bibliographic search was conducted in PubMed and Cochrane Library to perform a non-systematic review, using key words: Urology, Emergency and COVID-19, to determine recommendations for patients that should receive emergency care due to urological pathology. RESULTS: The main recommendations and protocols in the management of different urological emergencies during the COVID-19 pandemic are reviewed and discussed. CONCLUSIONS: We are living a new condition with the COVID-19 pandemic, which obliges urologists to conform to the guidelines that appear on a daily basis formulated by multidisciplinary surgical groups to manage urological emergencies. Consequently, in this time of health crisis, we must adapt to the resources available, implementing all biosecurity measures to protect patients and all health personnel who are in charge of patient management.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologists/psychology , Urology/standards , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Urology/trends
16.
Int Braz J Urol ; 46(suppl.1): 26-33, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611614

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted our lives, our habits and our healthcare system. Italy is one of the countries affected first and more aggressively from the outbreak. Our rapidity has been guide for other healthcare systems from around the World. We describe the impact of COVID-19 on Urology, how the Urological scientific community responded to the emergency and our experience in a high-volume Roman University hospital. The aim of our work is to share our experience providing suggestions for other global hospitals on how to manage the COVID-19 emergency.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Hospitals , Humans , Italy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int Braz J Urol ; 46(suppl.1): 93-97, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611613

ABSTRACT

This review discusses the impact of COVID-19 in Female Urology, revises the most important disorders in this field and how their diagnosis and treatment may be modified due to the current pandemic. The text also discusses new options such as telemedicine and what clinical situations within Female Urology should be of utmost importance for the urologist to be careful about. We also discuss how surgeries are being postponed are resumed according to the local scenario.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Urology/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Female Urogenital Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Urology/methods
18.
Int Braz J Urol ; 46(suppl.1): 133-144, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611610

ABSTRACT

Medical and surgical priorities have changed dramatically at the time of this pandemic. Scientific societies around the World have provided rapid guidance, underpinned by the best knowledge available, on the adaptation of their guidelines recommendations to the current situation. There are very limited scientific evidence especially in our subspecialty of pediatric urology. We carry out a review of the little scientific evidence based mainly on the few publications available to date and on the recommendations of the main scientific societies regarding which patients should undergo surgery, when surgery should be performed and how patient visits should be organize.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Pediatrics/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Urology/trends , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Eur Urol Focus ; 6(5): 1032-1048, 2020 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-437422

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The unprecedented health care scenario caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has revolutionized urology practice worldwide. OBJECTIVE: To review the recommendations by the international and European national urological associations/societies (UASs) on prioritization strategies for both oncological and nononcological procedures released during the current emergency scenario. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Each UAS official website was searched between April 8 and 18, 2020, to retrieve any document, publication, or position paper on prioritization strategies regarding both diagnostic and therapeutic urological procedures, and any recommendations on the use of telemedicine and minimally invasive surgery. We collected detailed information on all urological procedures, stratified by disease, priority (higher vs lower), and patient setting (outpatient vs inpatient). Then, we critically discussed the implications of such recommendations for urology practice in both the forthcoming "adaptive" and the future "chronic" phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Overall, we analyzed the recommendations from 13 UASs, of which four were international (American Urological Association, Confederation Americana de Urologia, European Association of Urology, and Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand) and nine national (from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, The Netherlands, and the UK). In the outpatient setting, the procedures that are likely to impact the future burden of urologists' workload most are prostate biopsies and elective procedures for benign conditions. In the inpatient setting, the most relevant contributors to this burden are represented by elective surgeries for lower-risk prostate and renal cancers, nonobstructing stone disease, and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Finally, some UASs recommended special precautions to perform minimally invasive surgery, while others outlined the potential role of telemedicine to optimize resources in the current and future scenarios. CONCLUSIONS: The expected changes will put significant strain on urological units worldwide regarding the overall workload of urologists, internal logistics, inflow of surgical patients, and waiting lists. In light of these predictions, urologists should strive to leverage this emergency period to reshape their role in the future. PATIENT SUMMARY: Overall, there was a large consensus among different urological associations/societies regarding the prioritization of most urological procedures, including those in the outpatient setting, urological emergencies, and many inpatient surgeries for both oncological and nononcological conditions. On the contrary, some differences were found regarding specific cancer surgeries (ie, radical cystectomy for higher-risk bladder cancer and nephrectomy for larger organ-confined renal masses), potentially due to different prioritization criteria and/or health care contexts. In the future, the outpatient procedures that are likely to impact the burden of urologists' workload most are prostate biopsies and elective procedures for benign conditions. In the inpatient setting, the most relevant contributors to this burden are represented by elective surgeries for lower-risk prostate and renal cancers, nonobstructing stone disease, and benign prostatic hyperplasia.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Urologic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Urologic Neoplasms/therapy , Urology/trends , Ambulatory Care/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Europe/epidemiology , Forecasting , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Telemedicine/trends , Urologic Diseases/diagnosis , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures/trends , Urology/organization & administration , Urology/standards
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