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2.
N Engl J Med ; 385(27): 2504-2505, 2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585662
3.
Rev Med Virol ; 31(6): e2222, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574478

ABSTRACT

The emergence of a novel human coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has engaged considerable awareness and attention around the world. The associated disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19), has now involved virtually all 200 countries. The total number of confirmed cases has been much more than in the two previous outbreaks of human coronaviruses, that is, SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. In line with the outbreak escalation, false information about SARS-CoV-2 and its associated disease disseminated globally, particularly through online and social media. Believers in conspiracy theories promote misinformation that the virus is not contagious, is the result of laboratory manipulation or is created to gain profit by distributing new vaccines. The most dangerous effect of this widely disseminated misinformation is it will negatively influence the attitudes and behaviours for preventive measures to contain the outbreak. In this review, I discuss common conspiracy theories associated with SARS-CoV-2 and Covid-19 and consider how we can address and counterbalance these issues based on scientific information and studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mass Vaccination/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Politics , Prejudice/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Scientific Misconduct/ethics , Social Media/ethics
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6535-6543, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544301

ABSTRACT

Measurement of the population's general knowledge of the coronavirus vaccine is very important to improve public acceptance and decrease vaccine hesitancy in confronting the disease. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of the participants towards the coronavirus vaccine. Data were collected using an online survey, in the form of a structured questionnaire, conducted during April-May 2021 in Egypt, and subjects from all over Egypt participated. The questionnaire was divided into three parts to assess the knowledge and attitude regarding coronavirus. The first part was to assess participants' experience about coronavirus infection (eight items), the second was to assess the health beliefs about coronavirus and vaccine (16 items) and the third was to assess general knowledge, attitude, and practices of the participants towards vaccine (28 items). A total of 871 (465 females) participants participated, 81% of them were still committed to the precautionary measures for protection. Eighty-eight percent of them accepted to take the vaccine. Eighty-three percent of the participants answered that they will encourage family, friends, and colleagues to get the vaccine. Ninety-four percent knew that the coronavirus vaccine provides immunity against infection for a period of 6-12 months. 91.9% believed that the current infection with coronavirus is one of the main contraindications to vaccination. Eighty-nine percent believed that both pregnant women and chronic disease patients can get vaccinated and also that there is no specific age for a specific type of vaccination. Ninety-four percent of them knew that subjects taking immunosuppressive drugs should be prescribed Sinopharm, not AstraZeneca vaccine. The median score of this survey was 20/22 regarding knowledge about the coronavirus vaccine. Overall, the study participants had good knowledge about the coronavirus vaccine and accepted to take the vaccine, which indicates the highly commendable efforts to confront the coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Egypt , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Young Adult
5.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(10): 1388-1395, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518654

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunization, as a process of fighting against the COVID-19, has gained important research appeal, but very limited endeavor has been paid for vaccine behavioral studies in underdeveloped and developing countries. This study explores the vaccine demand, hesitancy, and nationalism as well as vaccine acceptance and domestic vaccine preference among young adults in Bangladesh. METHODOLOGY: This quantitative study followed the snowball sampling technique and collected responses from 1,018 individuals from various social media platforms. The analysis covered both descriptive and inferential statistics including chi-square, F-statistic, and logistic regression. RESULTS: The findings of the fully-adjusted regression model suggest that the individuals who had more vaccine demand were 3.29 times (95% confidence interval = 2.39-4.54; p < 0.001) higher to accept vaccine compared to those who had no vaccine demand. Conversely, vaccine hesitancy was negatively associated with vaccine acceptance. Here, the odds ratio was found 0.70 (95% confidence interval = 0.62-0.80; p < 0.001), which means that those who had higher vaccine hesitancy were about 30% less likely to accept vaccines than those who had no hesitancy. In addition, the persons who had vaccine nationalism were 1.75 times (95% confidence interval = 1.62-1.88; p < 0.001) more prone to prefer domestic vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that policymakers may take initiatives for making people aware and knowledgeable about the severity and vulnerability to specific health threats. In this concern, perception and efficacy-increasing programs may take part in increasing protection motivation behaviors like vaccine acceptance and (domestic) vaccine preference.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Motivation , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination/psychology , Adolescent , Bangladesh , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urban Population/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Young Adult
6.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259513, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511829

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A high population level of vaccination is required to control the COVID-19 pandemic, but not all Canadians are convinced of the value and safety of vaccination. Understanding more about these individuals can aid in developing strategies to increase their acceptance of a COVID-19 vaccine. The objectives of this study were to describe COVID-19 vaccine acceptance, hesitancy and refusal rates and associated factors in Saskatchewan, Canada. METHODS: This is a cross-sequential study that consisted of pooled responses from weighted samples of 9,252 Saskatchewan adults (≥18 years) across nine rounds of data collection between May 4, 2020 and April 3, 2021. The outcome variable was vaccine intention: vaccine acceptance, hesitancy, and refusal. The independent variables were layered into socio-demographic factors, risk of exposure to coronavirus, mitigating behaviours, and perceptions of COVID-19. Data were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression and a classification and regression tree. RESULTS: Seventy-six percent of the respondents indicated that they had been or were willing to be vaccinated, 13% had not yet decided, and the remaining 11% said they would not be vaccinated. Factors that increased the likelihood of vaccine refusal and hesitancy were lower education level, financial instability, Indigenous status, and not being concerned about spreading the coronavirus. Perceiving COVID-19 to be more of a threat to one's community and believing that one had a higher risk of illness or death from COVID-19 decreased the likelihood of both vaccine refusal and hesitancy. Women and newcomers to Canada were more likely to be unsure about getting vaccinated. Respondents who did not plan to be vaccinated were less likely to wear face masks and practice physical distancing. CONCLUSION: While many Canadians have voluntarily and eagerly become vaccinated already, reaching sufficient coverage of the population is likely to require targeted efforts to convince those who are resistant or unsure. Identifying and overcoming any barriers to vaccination that exist within the socio-demographic groups we found were least likely to be vaccinated is a crucial component.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saskatchewan/epidemiology
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21844, 2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503889

ABSTRACT

This study assesses attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination and the predictive value of COVID-VAC, a novel scale, among adults in the four largest US metropolitan areas and nationally. A 36-item survey of 6037 Americans was conducted in mid-April 2021. The study reports factors for COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among: (1) already vaccinated; (2) unvaccinated but willing to accept a vaccine; and (3) unvaccinated and unwilling to vaccinate. More than 20% were unwilling to vaccinate, expressing concerns about vaccine efficacy and safety and questioning the disease's severity. Poverty, working outside of the home and conservative political views are predictors of unwillingness. Conversely, those who either personally tested positive for COVID-19, or had a family member who did so, were more likely to accept vaccination. Majorities of all respondents supported vaccination mandates for employees and university students. Respondents preferred to receive vaccines in their doctor´s office. Lower income and conservative ideology, but not race, were strongly associated with vaccine unwillingness. The predictive value of COVID-VAC was demonstrated. While vaccination mandates are likely to be accepted, additional effective, targeted interventions to increase vaccine uptake are needed urgently.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/trends , Adult , Attitude , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Female , Guideline Adherence/trends , Health Policy/trends , Humans , Intention , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/trends , Vaccines/pharmacology
8.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0259059, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496525

ABSTRACT

As safe and effective vaccines become widely available, attaining herd immunity and limiting the spread of COVID-19 will depend on individuals choosing to vaccinate-and doing so quickly enough to outpace mutations. Using online surveys conducted across six Latin American countries in January 2021, we experimentally assess messages designed to counteract informational deficiencies and collective action problems that may drive hesitancy. We first find that basic vaccine information persuades around 8% of hesitant individuals to become willing to vaccinate, reduces intended wait to vaccinate by 0.4 months, and increases willingness to encourage others to vaccinate. Rather than facilitating free riding, learning, or social conformity, additional information about others' behavior increases vaccine acceptance when respondents expect herd immunity will be achieved. Finally, priming the social approval benefits of vaccinating also increases vaccine acceptance. These results suggest that providing information and shaping social expectations and incentives could both significantly increase vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Latin America , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Persuasive Communication , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/trends , Vaccines/pharmacology
9.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258540, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496510

ABSTRACT

As of May 2021, over 286 million coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine doses have been administered across the country. This data is promising, however there are still populations that, despite availability, are declining vaccination. We reviewed vaccine likelihood and receptiveness to recommendation from a doctor or nurse survey responses from 101,048 adults (≥18 years old) presenting to 442 primary care clinics in 8 states and the District of Columbia. Occupation was self-reported and demographic information extracted from the medical record, with 58.3% (n = 58,873) responding they were likely to receive the vaccine, 23.6% (n = 23,845) unlikely, and 18.1% (n = 18,330) uncertain. We found that essential workers were 18% less likely to receive the COVID-19 vaccination. Of those who indicated they were not already "very likely" to receive the vaccine, a recommendation from a nurse or doctor resulted in 16% of respondents becoming more likely to receive the vaccine, although certain occupations were less likely than others to be receptive to recommendations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to look at vaccine intent and receptiveness to recommendations from a doctor or nurse across specific essential worker occupations, and may help inform future early phase, vaccine rollouts and public health measure implementations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/trends , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Demography/methods , Female , Humans , Intention , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Social Class , United States , Vaccination/psychology
10.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0248325, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, many pharmaceutical companies have been racing to develop a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. Simultaneously, rumors and misinformation about COVID-19 are still widely spreading. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of COVID-19 misinformation among the Yemeni population and its association with vaccine acceptance and perceptions. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in four major cities in Yemen. The constructed questionnaire consisted of four main sections (sociodemographic data, misinformation, perceptions (perceived susceptibility, severity, and worry), and vaccination acceptance evaluation). Subject recruitment and data collection were conducted online utilizing social websites and using the snowball sampling technique. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed using SPSS version 27. RESULTS: The total number of respondents was 484. Over 60% of them were males and had a university education. More than half had less than 100$ monthly income and were khat chewers, while only 18% were smokers. Misinformation prevalence ranged from 8.9% to 38.9%, depending on the statement being asked. Men, university education, higher income, employment, and living in urban areas were associated with a lower misinformation level (p <0.05). Statistically significant association (p <0.05) between university education, living in urban areas, and being employed with perceived susceptibility were observed. The acceptance rate was 61.2% for free vaccines, but it decreased to 43% if they had to purchase it. Females, respondents with lower monthly income, and those who believed that pharmaceutical companies made the virus for financial gains were more likely to reject the vaccination (p <0.05). CONCLUSION: The study revealed that the acceptance rate to take a vaccine was suboptimal and significantly affected by gender, misinformation, cost, and income. Furthermore, being female, non-university educated, low-income, and living in rural areas were associated with higher susceptibility to misinformation about COVID-19. These findings show a clear link between misinformation susceptibility and willingness to vaccinate. Focused awareness campaigns to decrease misinformation and emphasize the vaccination's safety and efficacy might be fundamental before initiating any mass vaccination in Yemen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Vaccination Refusal , Vaccination , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Yemen/epidemiology
12.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e225, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467028

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy remains a serious global threat to achieve herd immunity, and this study aimed to assess the magnitude and associated factors of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) vaccine hesitancy among healthcare workers (HCWs) in Amhara regional referral hospitals. A web-based anonymised survey was conducted among 440 HCWs in the Amhara region referral hospitals. The questionnaire was designed using Google Forms and distributed using telegram and e-mail from 15 May to 10 June 2021 to the randomly selected participants in each hospital. The data were analysed with Stata 14.0 and described using frequency tables. A multivariable binary logistic regression model was fitted and model fitness was checked with the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test. Out of 440 participants, 418 were willing to participate in the study and the mean age was about 30 years. Overall, 45.9% (n = 192) of participants reported vaccine hesitancy. After applying multivariate analysis, age ≤25 years (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 5.6); do not wear a mask (aOR = 2.4); not compliance with physical distancing (aOR = 3.6); unclear information by public health authorities (aOR = 2.5); low risk of getting COVID-19 infection (aOR = 2.8); and not sure about the tolerability of the vaccine (aOR = 3.76) were associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. A considerable proportion of HCWs were hesitant towards COVID-19 vaccine, and this can be tackled with the provision of clear information about the vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Adult , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Risk Factors , Secondary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
17.
Brain Res Bull ; 176: 161-173, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413366

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has persisted for more than a year, and post-COVID-19 sequelae of neurological complications, including direct and indirect effects on the central nervous system (CNS), have been recognized. There is a plethora of evidence for neurological, cognitive, and emotional deficits in COVID-19 patients. Acute neurological symptoms like neuroinflammation, cognitive impairment, loss of smell, and brain stroke are common direct effects among SARS-CoV-2 infected individuals. Work-associated stress, lockdowns, social distancing, and quarantine in response to contain SARS-CoV-2 have also affected the mental health of large populations, regardless of age. Public health emergencies have affected individuals and communities, resulting in emotional reactions and unhealthy behaviors. Although vaccines have been widely distributed and administered among large populations, vaccine hesitancy still exists and may be due to apprehension about vaccine efficacy, preliminary trials, and associated side effects. This review highlights the impact of COVID-19 on the CNS by outlining direct and indirect effects and factors contributing to the decline in people's mental health throughout the COVID-19 pandemic both during and after vaccine administration. Furthermore, we also discuss reasons for vaccine hesitancy and why some groups of people are deprived of vaccines. Finally, we touched upon the social determinants of mental health and their impact on disadvantaged populations during times of crisis which may help policymakers set up some action plans to mitigate the COVID-19 mental health turmoil during this ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Mental Health/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Vaccination/trends , Vaccination Refusal/trends , Vaccines
18.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256080, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prenatal care providers will play an important role in the acceptance of SARS-Cov-2 vaccination for pregnant women. OBJECTIVE: To determine the perceptions of French prenatal care providers: midwives, general practitioners (GPs) and obstetricians and gynaecologists (Ob-Gyn) regarding SARS-CoV-2 vaccination during pregnancy. STUDY DESIGN: An anonymous online survey was sent to members of French professional societies representing prenatal practitioners. The participants were asked to answer questions on their characteristics and give their opinions of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine for themselves and women who are pregnant or willing to become pregnant. RESULTS: Access to the survey was opened from January 11th, 2021, to March 1st, 2021. A total of 1,416 responses were collected from 749 Ob-Gyn, 598 midwives and 69 GPs. Most respondents (86.7% overall, 90.4% for Ob-GYN, 81.1% for GPs and 80.1% for midwives) agreed to receive the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 would be offered to pregnant women by 49.4% 95%CI [48.1-50.8] of the participants. Midwives were less likely to recommend vaccination than GP and Ob-Gyn (37.5%, 50.7% and 58.8%, respectively). The multinomial logistic regression revealed that being an obstetrician, working in a group, usually offering a flu vaccine and wanting to be vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 were positively associated with considering pregnant women for SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. CONCLUSION: Most French prenatal healthcare providers are favourable towards vaccinating pregnant women, but a large minority express reservation. More evidence on safety and involvement by professional organisations will be important to encourage the access of pregnant women to vaccination against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Maternal Health Services , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physician's Role , Pregnant Women , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal/psychology
19.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 762, 2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403217

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination has raised concerns about vaccine hesitancy in general and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in particular. Understanding the factors driving the uncertainty regarding vaccination against COVID-19 is crucial. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was designed to identify the perceptions and attitudes of healthcare workers (HCWs) towards COVID-19 vaccines and determine the predictive factors that affect their willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. An online survey was distributed among HCWs to collect data assessing demographic and general characteristics of the participants and vaccine-related characteristics, including source of information about the vaccine. In addition to items assessing the perception of COVID-19, there were items on COVID-19 vaccines and attitude towards vaccination in general and towards COVID-19 vaccines in particular. RESULTS: The participants were classified according to their willingness to take the COVID-19 vaccine as follows: hesitant (41.9%), refusing (32.1%), and willing (26%). Statistically significant differences were observed among the three groups for the perception of COVID-19 vaccines, attitude towards vaccination in general, and COVID-19 vaccines in particular (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Although the participants adequately perceived COVID-19 severity, prevention, and COVID-19 vaccine safety, they were widely hesitant or refused to be vaccinated. A multidimensional approach is required to increase the vaccine acceptability rate. Higher income and increased years of work experience are positive predictors of willingness to receive a vaccine. Thus, further studies addressing the scope of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy are warranted as an initial step to build trust in COVID-19 vaccination efforts with continuous monitoring of attitudes and practices of HCWs towards COVID-19 vaccines in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
20.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(11): 3243-3246, 2021 10 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401752

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Vaccine Hesitancy (VH) is a relevant obstacle for the COVID-19 vaccination campaign. The aim of this study is to assess the proportion of subjects unwilling to vaccinate among patients with type 1 (T1DM) and 2 (T2DM) diabetes, exploring factors associated with VH. METHODS AND RESULTS: A purposely created interview was delivered from physicians to a consecutive series of adult (>18 years) subjects with diabetes referring to the Diabetes Outpatient Clinic of Careggi Hospital, Florence, from January 1st to April 30th 2021. Out of 502 subjects enrolled, 92 were vaccine hesitant respondents (18.3%); the corresponding figure for T1DM and T2DM was 13.0% (N = 14), and 19.9% (N = 78), respectively. After adjusting for age, higher HbA1c (1.07 [1.02-1.13], p = 0.008) and triglycerides levels (1.03 [1.01-1.06], p = 0.011) were positively associated with VH, among patients with T1DM. At multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, creatinine, and statin use, patients with T2DM affected by obesity (9.98 [4.89-9.59], p < 0.01) and with lower levels of creatinine (0.36 [0.21-0.54], p = 0.029) were more likely to refuse COVID vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: Hesitancy toward COVID-19 vaccination among subjects with diabetes is not negligible and seems to be more prevalent in individuals with lower adherence to medical prescriptions and/or reduced concerns over their health. This suggests the need for specific interventions to increase awareness and counter prejudices on vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/psychology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal/psychology
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