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1.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262192, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603690

ABSTRACT

Equal Access to the COVID-19 vaccine for all remains a major public health issue. The current study compared the prevalence of vaccination reluctance in general and COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and social and health factors associated with intentions to receive the vaccine. A random socio-epidemiological population-based survey was conducted in France in November 2020, in which 85,855 adults participants were included in this study. We used logistic regressions to study being "not at all in favor" to vaccination in general, and being "certainly not" willing to get vaccinated against Covid-19. Our analysis highlighted a gendered reluctance toward vaccination in general but even more so regarding vaccination against COVID-19 (OR = 1.88 (95% CI: 1.79-1.97)). We also found that people at the bottom of the social hierarchy, in terms of level of education, financial resources, were more likely to refuse the COVID-19 vaccine (from OR = 1.22 (95% CI:1.10-1.35) for respondents without diploma to OR = 0.52 (95% CI:0.47-0.57) for High school +5 or more years level). People from the French overseas departments, immigrants and descendants of immigrants, were all more reluctant to the Covid-19 vaccine (first-generation Africa/Asia immigrants OR = 1.16 (95% CI:1.04-1.30)) versus OR = 2.19 (95% CI:1.96-2.43) for the majority population). Finally, our analysis showed that those who reported not trusting the government were more likely to be Covid-19 vaccine-reluctant (OR = 3.29 (95% CI: 3.13-3.45)). Specific campaigns should be thought beforehand to reach women and people at the bottom of the social hierarchy to avoid furthering social inequalities in terms of morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination Refusal/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , France/epidemiology , Hostility , Humans , Intention , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Socioeconomic Factors , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , /statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Vaccines
2.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6535-6543, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544301

ABSTRACT

Measurement of the population's general knowledge of the coronavirus vaccine is very important to improve public acceptance and decrease vaccine hesitancy in confronting the disease. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of the participants towards the coronavirus vaccine. Data were collected using an online survey, in the form of a structured questionnaire, conducted during April-May 2021 in Egypt, and subjects from all over Egypt participated. The questionnaire was divided into three parts to assess the knowledge and attitude regarding coronavirus. The first part was to assess participants' experience about coronavirus infection (eight items), the second was to assess the health beliefs about coronavirus and vaccine (16 items) and the third was to assess general knowledge, attitude, and practices of the participants towards vaccine (28 items). A total of 871 (465 females) participants participated, 81% of them were still committed to the precautionary measures for protection. Eighty-eight percent of them accepted to take the vaccine. Eighty-three percent of the participants answered that they will encourage family, friends, and colleagues to get the vaccine. Ninety-four percent knew that the coronavirus vaccine provides immunity against infection for a period of 6-12 months. 91.9% believed that the current infection with coronavirus is one of the main contraindications to vaccination. Eighty-nine percent believed that both pregnant women and chronic disease patients can get vaccinated and also that there is no specific age for a specific type of vaccination. Ninety-four percent of them knew that subjects taking immunosuppressive drugs should be prescribed Sinopharm, not AstraZeneca vaccine. The median score of this survey was 20/22 regarding knowledge about the coronavirus vaccine. Overall, the study participants had good knowledge about the coronavirus vaccine and accepted to take the vaccine, which indicates the highly commendable efforts to confront the coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Egypt , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Young Adult
5.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0248325, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, many pharmaceutical companies have been racing to develop a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. Simultaneously, rumors and misinformation about COVID-19 are still widely spreading. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the prevalence of COVID-19 misinformation among the Yemeni population and its association with vaccine acceptance and perceptions. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in four major cities in Yemen. The constructed questionnaire consisted of four main sections (sociodemographic data, misinformation, perceptions (perceived susceptibility, severity, and worry), and vaccination acceptance evaluation). Subject recruitment and data collection were conducted online utilizing social websites and using the snowball sampling technique. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed using SPSS version 27. RESULTS: The total number of respondents was 484. Over 60% of them were males and had a university education. More than half had less than 100$ monthly income and were khat chewers, while only 18% were smokers. Misinformation prevalence ranged from 8.9% to 38.9%, depending on the statement being asked. Men, university education, higher income, employment, and living in urban areas were associated with a lower misinformation level (p <0.05). Statistically significant association (p <0.05) between university education, living in urban areas, and being employed with perceived susceptibility were observed. The acceptance rate was 61.2% for free vaccines, but it decreased to 43% if they had to purchase it. Females, respondents with lower monthly income, and those who believed that pharmaceutical companies made the virus for financial gains were more likely to reject the vaccination (p <0.05). CONCLUSION: The study revealed that the acceptance rate to take a vaccine was suboptimal and significantly affected by gender, misinformation, cost, and income. Furthermore, being female, non-university educated, low-income, and living in rural areas were associated with higher susceptibility to misinformation about COVID-19. These findings show a clear link between misinformation susceptibility and willingness to vaccinate. Focused awareness campaigns to decrease misinformation and emphasize the vaccination's safety and efficacy might be fundamental before initiating any mass vaccination in Yemen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Vaccination Refusal , Vaccination , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Yemen/epidemiology
6.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e225, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467028

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy remains a serious global threat to achieve herd immunity, and this study aimed to assess the magnitude and associated factors of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) vaccine hesitancy among healthcare workers (HCWs) in Amhara regional referral hospitals. A web-based anonymised survey was conducted among 440 HCWs in the Amhara region referral hospitals. The questionnaire was designed using Google Forms and distributed using telegram and e-mail from 15 May to 10 June 2021 to the randomly selected participants in each hospital. The data were analysed with Stata 14.0 and described using frequency tables. A multivariable binary logistic regression model was fitted and model fitness was checked with the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test. Out of 440 participants, 418 were willing to participate in the study and the mean age was about 30 years. Overall, 45.9% (n = 192) of participants reported vaccine hesitancy. After applying multivariate analysis, age ≤25 years (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 5.6); do not wear a mask (aOR = 2.4); not compliance with physical distancing (aOR = 3.6); unclear information by public health authorities (aOR = 2.5); low risk of getting COVID-19 infection (aOR = 2.8); and not sure about the tolerability of the vaccine (aOR = 3.76) were associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. A considerable proportion of HCWs were hesitant towards COVID-19 vaccine, and this can be tackled with the provision of clear information about the vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Adult , Attitude to Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Risk Factors , Secondary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
7.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 10, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449275

ABSTRACT

Introduction: healthcare workers are at higher risk of COVID-19 infection with ease of infection transmissibility to coworkers and patients. Vaccine hesitancy rates of 56% and up to 25% have been reported among healthcare workers in US and China respectively. Vaccination is known as the most effective strategy to combat infectious diseases. Acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine plays a major role in combating the pandemic. This study assessed the sociodemographic factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among healthcare workers in Abia State. Methods: a cross-sectional study among 422 healthcare workers was conducted in Abia State with an online-based questionnaire. The questionnaire extracted information on socio-demographics and willingness to take vaccine uptake. Descriptive statistics was used to calculate frequencies and proportions. Bivariate analysis was used to test the association between the socio-demographic factors and the outcome variable (vaccine hesitancy). Logistic regression was conducted to identify the predictors of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. The level of significance was 5%. Results: mean age of the respondents was 40.6 ± 9.5 years and 67.1% were females The COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy rate was 50.5% (95%CI: 45.6%-55.3%). Socio-demographic factors included age, marital status, location of practice, profession, and income. Vaccine Hesitancy was predicted significantly by younger age (aOR=9.34, 95%CI:2.01-43.39), marital status (single) (aOR=4.97, 95%CI:1.46-16.97), lower income (aOR=2.84, 95%CI:1.32-6.08), and profession - Doctor (aOR=0.28, 95%CI:0.11-0.70), Nurse (aOR=0.31, 95%CI:0.15-0.64) and other allied health professionals (aOR=0.22, 95%CI:0.10-0.44). Conclusion: COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy was high among healthcare workers. Significant sociodemographic predictors influence the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine. We recommend that the Federal and State Ministries of Health conduct awareness campaigns targeting the younger age group, singles, lower income class, and non-clinical staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Income , Male , Marital Status , Middle Aged , Nigeria , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102271, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385430

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The survey aimed to assess COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and hesitancy rate among patients with diabetes and address barriers and beliefs that affect acceptance to take COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: A quantitative research approach with cross-sectional design was used to collect data from March-May'2021. Saudi residents with diabetes, aged ≥18 years were included. RESULTS: Of the total 709 participants, 42.2% had family member with COVID-19, 14.7% had COVID-19, 34.0% had been with someone who had COVID-19. 34.7% of participants taken COVID-19 vaccination, 36.2% were willing to take, while 79.0% supported COVID-19 vaccine. Main reasons behind uncertainties towards vaccinations were relatively fast production, not many trials done and about genetic component. 44.6% got information about COVID-19 and vaccination through television, social media, and ministry website. On adjusting models, female gender, longer duration of diabetes and no history of influenza vaccine significantly associated with COVID vaccine uptake. CONCLUSION: Participants are willing to vaccinate but show some fear and misinformation. It is imperative that due efforts are made for increasing vaccine willingness, and availability of precise information holds key to success. Otherwise, state will have to continue to funnel in resources towards post-on-set disease management, consuming a lot more resources than preventive measures like vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Vaccination Refusal , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/psychology , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
11.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 41: 102059, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Determinants of vaccine acceptance are multifactorial, complex, and in most cases, context-dependent. We determined the prevalence of COVID-19 vaccination intention (VI) and fear of its adverse effects (FAE) as well as their associated factors in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). METHODS: We conducted a secondary cross-sectional analysis of a database collected by the University of Maryland and Facebook. We included participants aged 18 and over from LAC surveyed, January 15 to February 1, 2021. We evaluated VI, FAE, sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 symptomatology, compliance with community mitigation strategies, food and economic insecurity, mental health evaluation and the influence in VI when recommended by different stakeholders. We calculated crude and adjusted prevalence ratios with their 95%CIs. RESULTS: We analyzed 472,521 responses by Latin American adults, finding a VI and FAE prevalence of 80.0% and 81.2%, respectively. We found that female and non-binary genders were associated with a lower probability of VI and a higher probability of FAE. Besides, living in a town, village or rural area and economic insecurity was associated with a higher FAE probability. The fears of becoming seriously ill, a family member becoming seriously ill from COVID-19 and having depressive symptoms were associated with a higher probability of VI and FAE. CONCLUSION: Eight out of 10 adults in LAC have VI and FAE. The factors identified are useful for the development of communication strategies to reduce FAE frequency. It is necessary to guarantee mass vaccination and support the return of economic activities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Caribbean Region/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intention , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256496, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369567

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While vaccines ensure individual protection against COVID-19 infection, delay in receipt or refusal of vaccines will have both individual and community impacts. The behavioral factors of vaccine hesitancy or refusal are a crucial dimension that need to be understood in order to design appropriate interventions. The aim of this study was to explore the behavioral determinants of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and to provide recommendations to increase the acceptance and uptake of COVID-19 vaccines in Bangladesh. METHODS: We employed a Barrier Analysis (BA) approach to examine twelve potential behavioral determinants (drawn from the Health Belief Model [HBM] and Theory of Reasoned Action [TRA]) of intended vaccine acceptance. We conducted 45 interviews with those who intended to take the vaccine (Acceptors) and another 45 interviews with those who did not have that intention (Non-acceptors). We performed data analysis to find statistically significant differences and to identify which beliefs were most highly associated with acceptance and non-acceptance with COVID-19 vaccines. RESULTS: The behavioral determinants associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance in Dhaka included perceived social norms, perceived safety of COVID-19 vaccines and trust in them, perceived risk/susceptibility, perceived self-efficacy, perceived positive and negative consequences, perceived action efficacy, perceived severity of COVID-19, access, and perceived divine will. In line with the HBM, beliefs about the disease itself were highly predictive of vaccine acceptance, and some of the strongest statistically-significant (p<0.001) predictors of vaccine acceptance in this population are beliefs around both injunctive and descriptive social norms. Specifically, Acceptors were 3.2 times more likely to say they would be very likely to get a COVID-19 vaccine if a doctor or nurse recommended it, twice as likely to say that most people they know will get a vaccine, and 1.3 times more likely to say that most close family and friends will get a vaccine. The perceived safety of vaccines was found to be important since Non-acceptors were 1.8 times more likely to say that COVID-19 vaccines are "not safe at all". Beliefs about one's risk of getting COVID-19 disease and the severity of it were predictive of being a vaccine acceptor: Acceptors were 1.4 times more likely to say that it was very likely that someone in their household would get COVID-19, 1.3 times more likely to say that they were very concerned about getting COVID-19, and 1.3 times more likely to say that it would be very serious if someone in their household contracted COVID-19. Other responses of Acceptors on what makes immunization easier may be helpful in programming to boost acceptance, such as providing vaccination through government health facilities, schools, and kiosks, and having vaccinators maintain proper COVID-19 health and safety protocols. CONCLUSION: An effective behavior change strategy for COVID-19 vaccines uptake will need to address multiple beliefs and behavioral determinants, reducing barriers and leveraging enablers identified in this study. National plans for promoting COVID-19 vaccination should address the barriers, enablers, and behavioral determinants found in this study in order to maximize the impact on COVID-19 vaccination acceptance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Attitude , Bangladesh , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Culture , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Urban Population/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology
13.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256493, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367708

ABSTRACT

In order to eliminate COVID-19, many countries provided vaccinations. However, success depends on peoples' knowledge levels and rates of acceptance. But, previous research on this topic is currently lacking in Bangladesh. This cross-sectional study aimed at to investigate Bangladeshi peoples' knowledge, acceptance, and perception of challenges regarding COVID-19 vaccines. Quantitative data were collected using an online survey (n = 1975) and face-to-face interviews (n = 2200) with a pre-tested structured questionnaire. In addition, seven open-ended interviews were conducted with health experts regarding challenges of vaccination. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between explanatory and dependent variables. Effect size was estimated to understand the magnitude of relationship between two variables. Of 4175 respondents, 92.6% knew about COVID-19 vaccines, while only 37.4% believed vaccines to be effective in controlling COVID-19. Nearly 46% of respondents believed that COVID-19 vaccines have side-effects, and 16.4% of respondents believed that side-effects could be life-threatening. Only 60.5% of respondents indicated that they would receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Out of 1650 respondents (39.5%) who did not intend to receive the vaccine, 948 (57.4%) believed that they would be naturally protected. Regressions results indicated that men had higher rates of knowledge regarding the vaccine. In addition, rural respondents demonstrated lower knowledge regarding the vaccine. Furthermore, education had a significant association with knowledge of COVID-19 vaccines. Respondents with university education had more knowledge regarding the vaccine (Odds ratio, OR = 29.99; 95% confidence interval, CI 11.40-78.90, effect size 1.88; p = 0.01) and correct dosage (OR 27.34; 95% CI 15.25-49.00, effect size 1.83; p = 0.01). However, women (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.40, effect size 0.08) and rural (OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.07-1.44, effect size 0.12; p = 0.01) respondents were more enthusiastic regarding receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. Higher educated respondents showed higher probability of receiving the vaccine. Those who believed in the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine were 11.57 times more interested (OR 11.57; 95% CI 8.92-15.01, effect size 1.35; p = 0.01) in receiving the vaccine. Open-ended interviews identified several challenges toward successful COVID-19 vaccination. Mass awareness creation, uninterrupted supply, equitable distribution, and sectoral coordination were suggested to achieve at least 70% immunization across the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Bangladesh , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Rural Population , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urban Population , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
14.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 20(10): 1339-1349, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352053

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy seriously hinders herd immunity. We explored the determinants of parental hesitancy to vaccinate children against Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China.A population-based self-administered online questionnaire evaluating parental hesitancy in vaccinating their children against COVID-19 was conducted in Taizhou, China. Of the 2463 parents who received the invitation, 1788 (72.6%) responded to the survey.Of the repondents, 52.5% were hesitant. Mothers exhibited a greater proportion of vaccine hesitancy than fathers did (57.5% vs. 41.7%, P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that parents with children under 18 years of age (OR = 0.94, 95%CI: 0.90-0.99), lower knowledge scores about COVID-19 vaccination (Q1: OR = 1.92, 95%CI: 1.37-2.69; Q2: OR = 1.51, 95%CI: 1.10-2.08), lower awareness of the permission of vaccinating children (OR = 1.74, 95%CI: 1.36-2.23) and hesitancy to inoculate themselves (OR = 8.18, 95%CI: 6.48-10.33) were associated with parental hesitancy to inoculate their children. Results also revealed the disparity between fathers and mothers regarding associated factors.This study found that a substantial proportion of parents reported being hesitant to vaccinate children against COVID-19, implying the necessity of comprehensive assessment and health education programs for vaccination systems in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fathers/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Child , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fathers/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mothers/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
15.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 20(9): 1185-1193, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As countries ramp up their COVID-19 vaccination programs, attitudes of the population remain a determining player in the success of these plans. This study analyses the factors associated with intent to vaccinate against COVID-19 in the Pakistani population. METHODOLOGY: This cross-sectional, anonymous, online survey was carried out in April 2021. Participants' demographic details, experiences relating to COVID-19 and its vaccination, and their health beliefs were inquired and divided across Health Belief Model constructs. Multivariable regression was used to determine factors associated with a No/Not sure vs Yes response for vaccination intention. RESULTS: Of the 655 respondents, 62.0% were willing to get vaccinated. Significant predictors of a less likelihood of resisting vaccination included advanced age (AOR 0.25; 95% CI 0.07-0.88), fear of contracting COVID-19 (AOR 0.47; 95% CI 0.27-0.82), hope of preventing its spread (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.19-0.49), and community pressure (AOR 0.22; 95% CI 0.13-0.37). Concerns about vaccine reliability (AOR 2.75; 95% CI 1.67-4.53) and religious inhibitions (AOR 2.45; 95% CI 1.34-4.48) swayed people away from vaccination. CONCLUSION: Despite a reasonably good response of Pakistanis to vaccination, factors negatively influencing their intention need to be timely addressed to control this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Mass Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pakistan , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Isr J Health Policy Res ; 10(1): 43, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339148

ABSTRACT

As of March 31, 2021, Israel had administered 116 doses of vaccine for COVID-19 per 100 population (of any age) - far more than any other OECD country. It was also ahead of other OECD countries in terms of the share of the population that had received at least one vaccination (61%) and the share that had been fully vaccinated (55%). Among Israelis aged 16 and over, the comparable figures were 81 and 74%, respectively. In light of this, the objectives of this article are: 1. To describe and analyze the vaccination uptake through the end of March 2021 2. To identify behavioral and other barriers that likely affected desire or ability to be vaccinated 3. To describe the efforts undertaken to overcome those barriers Israel's vaccination campaign was launched on December 20, and within 2.5 weeks, 20% of Israelis had received their first dose. Afterwards, the pace slowed. It took an additional 4 weeks to increase from 20 to 40% and yet another 6 weeks to increase from 40 to 60%. Initially, uptake was low among young adults, and two religious/cultural minority groups - ultra-Orthodox Jews and Israeli Arabs, but their uptake increased markedly over time.In the first quarter of 2021, Israel had to enhance access to the vaccine, address a moderate amount of vaccine hesitancy in its general population, and also address more intense pockets of vaccine hesitancy among young adults and religious/cultural minority groups. A continued high rate of infection during the months of February and March, despite broad vaccination coverage at the time, created confusion about vaccine effectiveness, which in turn contributed to vaccine hesitancy. Among Israeli Arabs, some residents of smaller villages encountered difficulties in reaching vaccination sites, and that also slowed the rate of vaccination.The challenges were addressed via a mix of messaging, incentives, extensions to the initial vaccine delivery system, and other measures. Many of the measures addressed the general population, while others were targeted at subgroups with below-average vaccination rates. Once the early adopters had been vaccinated, it took hard, creative work to increase population coverage from 40 to 60% and beyond.Significantly, some of the capacities and strategies that helped Israel address vaccine hesitancy and geographic access barriers are different from those that enabled it to procure, distribute and administer the vaccines. Some of these strategies are likely to be relevant to other countries as they progress from the challenges of securing an adequate vaccine supply and streamlining distribution to the challenge of encouraging vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , Israel , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors
17.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6535-6543, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306282

ABSTRACT

Measurement of the population's general knowledge of the coronavirus vaccine is very important to improve public acceptance and decrease vaccine hesitancy in confronting the disease. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of the participants towards the coronavirus vaccine. Data were collected using an online survey, in the form of a structured questionnaire, conducted during April-May 2021 in Egypt, and subjects from all over Egypt participated. The questionnaire was divided into three parts to assess the knowledge and attitude regarding coronavirus. The first part was to assess participants' experience about coronavirus infection (eight items), the second was to assess the health beliefs about coronavirus and vaccine (16 items) and the third was to assess general knowledge, attitude, and practices of the participants towards vaccine (28 items). A total of 871 (465 females) participants participated, 81% of them were still committed to the precautionary measures for protection. Eighty-eight percent of them accepted to take the vaccine. Eighty-three percent of the participants answered that they will encourage family, friends, and colleagues to get the vaccine. Ninety-four percent knew that the coronavirus vaccine provides immunity against infection for a period of 6-12 months. 91.9% believed that the current infection with coronavirus is one of the main contraindications to vaccination. Eighty-nine percent believed that both pregnant women and chronic disease patients can get vaccinated and also that there is no specific age for a specific type of vaccination. Ninety-four percent of them knew that subjects taking immunosuppressive drugs should be prescribed Sinopharm, not AstraZeneca vaccine. The median score of this survey was 20/22 regarding knowledge about the coronavirus vaccine. Overall, the study participants had good knowledge about the coronavirus vaccine and accepted to take the vaccine, which indicates the highly commendable efforts to confront the coronavirus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Egypt , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Young Adult
19.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 20(9): 1167-1175, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294622

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine by the target groups would play a crucial role in stemming the pandemic. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are the priority group for vaccination due to them having the highest risk of exposure to infection. This survey aimed to assess their acceptance of COVID-19 vaccines in Bangladesh. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional survey using an online questionnaire was conducted between January 3 to 25, 2021, among HCPs (n = 834) in Bangladesh. RESULTS: Less than 50% of HCPs would receive the vaccine against COVID-19 if available and 54% were willing to take the vaccine at some stage in the future. Female participants (OR:1.64;95%CI:1.172-2.297), respondents between 18-34 years old (OR:2.42; 95% CI:1.314-4.463), HCPs in the public sector (OR:2.09; 95% CI:1.521-2.878), and those who did not receive a flu vaccine in the previous year (OR:3.1; 95% CI:1.552-6.001) were more likely to delay vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: The study revealed that, if available, less than half of the HCPs would accept a COVID-19 vaccine in Bangladesh. To ensure the broader success of the vaccination drive, tailored strategies and vaccine promotion campaigns targeting HCPs and the general population are needed.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Bangladesh , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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