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3.
Am J Nurs ; 122(2): 45-48, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684819

ABSTRACT

What nurses need to know as hospitals institute COVID-19 vaccine mandates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Employment/legislation & jurisprudence , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260898, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635290

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the introduction of the novel COVID-19 vaccine, public hesitancy is being experienced with many turning to healthcare professionals for advice. As future physicians, medical students play a critical role in the public's view of the vaccine. OBJECTIVES: To determine the attitude of U.S. medical students toward mandating the COVID-19 vaccine to healthcare workers and patients, as well as whether their knowledge of the vaccine plays a role in their view. METHODS: The authors emailed a survey link to all U.S. medical schools with request to distribute it to their medical students. The survey remained open from 02/09/2021 to 03/15/2021 and included questions to determine the attitude of the medical students toward recommending the COVID-19 vaccine, and general knowledge questions about the vaccine. Chi square, Fisher's exact test, and linear regression were conducted to determine associations between willingness to recommend the COVID-19 vaccine and general knowledge of the vaccine. RESULTS: Among the 1,899 responses from medical students representing 151 U.S. medical schools, 57.82% approved of making the COVID-19 vaccine mandatory to healthcare workers, and 16.27% approved of making it mandatory to patients. Additionally, those who tested most knowledgeable of the vaccine were less likely to approve of making the vaccine mandatory for patients (66.67% vs. 72.70). Those that tested most knowledgeable were also more likely to personally receive the vaccine (72.35% vs 62.99%) as opposed to those that tested the least knowledgeable who were less willing to personally receive the vaccine (4.12% vs 14.17%). CONCLUSIONS: The data revealed that a slight majority of medical students support a vaccine mandate toward healthcare workers while a minority of medical students support a vaccine mandate toward healthcare workers. Additionally, medical students that had relatively high knowledge of the vaccine correlated with not approving of making the vaccine mandatory for patients. However increased knowledge of the vaccine correlated with increased willingness to personally receive the vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Students, Medical , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence , Adult , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , United States , /statistics & numerical data
11.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0261929, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622348

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of COVID-19 vaccine intention among Bangladeshi adults. METHODS: Secondary data from the COVID-19 Beliefs, Behaviors & Norms Survey conducted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Facebook were analyzed. Data were collected from 2,669 adult Facebook users in Bangladesh and was collected between February 15 and February 28, 2021. Binomial logistic regression examined the relationship between COVID-19 vaccination intent and demographic variables, risk perception, preventive behaviors, COVID-19 knowledge, and likelihood of future actions. RESULTS: Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported intent to get the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available. Intent to get vaccinated was highest among females, adults aged 71-80, individuals with college or graduate-level degrees, city dwellers, and individuals who perceived that they were in excellent health. Results of the binomial logistic regression indicated that predictors of vaccination intent include age (OR = 1.39), high risk perception of COVID-19 (OR = 1.47), and intent to practice social distancing (OR = 1.22). DISCUSSION: Findings suggest that age, perceived COVID-19 risk, and non-pharmaceutical COVID-19 interventions may predict COVID-19 vaccination intent among Bangladeshi adults. Findings can be used to create targeted messaging to increase demand for and uptake of COVID-19 vaccines in Bangladesh.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bangladesh , Female , Humans , Intention , Male , Middle Aged , Policy , Young Adult
18.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 21(1): 37-45, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488108

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vaccination is the most effective strategy to mitigating COVID-19 and restoring societal function. As the pandemic evolves with no certainty of a herd immunity threshold, universal vaccination of at-risk populations is desirable. However, vaccine hesitancy threatens the return to normalcy, and healthcare workers (HCWs) must embrace their ambassadorial role of shoring up vaccine confidence. Unfortunately, voluntary vaccination has been suboptimal among HCWs in the United States, a priority group for whom immunization is essential for maintaining health system capacity and the safety of high-risk patients in their care. Consequently, some health systems have implemented mandates to improve compliance. AREAS COVERED: This article discusses the ethical and practical considerations of mandatory COVID-19 vaccination policies for HCWs utilizing some components of the World Health Organization's framework and the unique context of a pandemic with evolving infection dynamics. EXPERT OPINION: COVID-19 vaccine mandates for universal immunization of HCWs raise ethical and practical debates about their appropriateness, especially when the vaccines are pending full approval in most jurisdictions. Given the superiority of the vaccines to safety and testing protocols and their favorable safety profile, we encourage health systems to adopt vaccination mandates through participatory processes that address the concerns of stakeholders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Health Personnel , Vaccination , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Personnel/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Policy , Social Justice , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20796, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479815

ABSTRACT

In a survey and three experiments (one preregistered with a nationally representative sample), we examined if vaccination requirements are likely to backfire, as commonly feared. We investigated if relative to encouraging free choice in vaccination, requiring a vaccine weakens or strengthens vaccination intentions, both in general and among individuals with a predisposition to experience psychological reactance. In the four studies, compared to free choice, requirements strengthened vaccination intentions across racial and ethnic groups, across studies, and across levels of trait psychological reactance. The results consistently suggest that fears of a backlash against vaccine mandates may be unfounded and that requirements will promote COVID-19 vaccine uptake in the United States.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Health Behavior , Health Policy , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence , Vaccination/psychology , African Americans , Female , Humans , Intention , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
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