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1.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 1, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538842

ABSTRACT

The world confronts today a disease which was unknown as recently as early 2019. Now that there is a safe and effective vaccine against COVID-19, lessons can usefully be drawn from previous well documented vaccination efforts. Of these, the best documented and most successful is the Smallpox Eradication Program (SEP). A review was made of publications by major players in smallpox eradication, respecting the important differences between the disease, this review revealed several points of connection. Cultural factors loomed large both in the eradication of smallpox and progress, to date, in the control of COVID-19. Other points of similarity included political commitment, the set-up of strong surveillance mechanisms, and assurance of uniformly high quality vaccines tested and approved by the World Health Organization. The future of COVID-19 control depends, in part, on lessons learned from previous vaccination efforts. A review of those efforts will avoid repetition of past errors and permit adoption of best practices from the past. Such analyses must, of course, respect the important differences between COVID-19 and smallpox.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Smallpox Vaccine/administration & dosage , Smallpox/prevention & control , Disease Eradication/methods , Global Health , Humans , Vaccination/methods , Vaccination Refusal
2.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6813-6817, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530183

ABSTRACT

Vaccination for SARS-CoV-2 is necessary to overcome coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the time-dependent vaccine-induced immune response is not well understood. This study aimed to investigate the dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 antispike immunoglobulin G (IgG) response. Medical staff participants who received two sequential doses of the BNT162b2 vaccination on days 0 and 21 were recruited prospectively from the Musashino Red Cross Hospital between March and May 2021. The quantitative antispike receptor-binding domain (RBD) IgG antibody responses were measured using the Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgGII Quant assay (cut off ≥50 AU/ml). A total of 59 participants without past COVID-19 history were continuously tracked with serum samples. The median age was 41 (22-75) years, and 14 participants were male (23.7%). The median antispike RBD IgG and seropositivity rates were 0 (0-31.1) AU/ml, 0.3 (0-39.5) AU/ml, 529.1 (48.3-8711.4) AU/ml, 18,836.9 (742.2-57,260.4) AU/ml, and 0%, 0%, 98.3%, and 100% on days 0, 3, 14, and 28 after the first vaccination, respectively. The antispike RBD IgG levels were significantly increased after day 14 from vaccination (p < 0.001) The BNT162b2 vaccination led almost all participants to obtain serum antispike RBD IgG 14 days after the first dose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunologic Tests/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Vaccination/methods , Young Adult
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6798-6802, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530182

ABSTRACT

Viral infections have been on the rise for the past decades. The impact of the viruses worsened amidst the pandemic burdening the already overwhelmed health care system in African countries. This article sheds light on how the coronavirus together with the already existing viral infections, some of which re-emerged, impacted the continent. The strategies in place such as immunization, education, will have to be strengthened in all African countries to reduce the burden. Furthermore, governments can further collaborate with other countries in creating guidelines to reduce co-infection of the diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Africa/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/immunology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/virology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0258743, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511818

ABSTRACT

BCG vaccination is known to induce innate immune memory, which confers protection against heterologous infections. However, the effect of BCG vaccination on the conventional adaptive immune cells subsets is not well characterized. We investigated the impact of BCG vaccination on the frequencies of T cell subsets and common gamma c (γc) cytokines in a group of healthy elderly individuals (age 60-80 years) at one month post vaccination as part of our clinical study to examine the effect of BCG on COVID-19. Our results demonstrate that BCG vaccination induced enhanced frequencies of central (p<0.0001) and effector memory (p<0.0001) CD4+ T cells and diminished frequencies of naïve (p<0.0001), transitional memory (p<0.0001), stem cell memory (p = 0.0001) CD4+ T cells and regulatory T cells. In addition, BCG vaccination induced enhanced frequencies of central (p = 0.0008), effector (p<0.0001) and terminal effector memory (p<0.0001) CD8+ T cells and diminished frequencies of naïve (p<0.0001), transitional memory (p<0.0001) and stem cell memory (p = 0.0034) CD8+T cells. BCG vaccination also induced enhanced plasma levels of IL-7 (p<0.0001) and IL-15 (p = 0.0020) but diminished levels of IL-2 (p = 0.0033) and IL-21 (p = 0.0020). Thus, BCG vaccination was associated with enhanced memory T cell subsets as well as memory enhancing γc cytokines in elderly individuals, suggesting its ability to induce non-specific adaptive immune responses.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Interleukin Receptor Common gamma Subunit/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Interleukins/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Vaccination/methods
5.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 745, 2021 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Seasonal influenza can circulate in parallel with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in winter. In the context of COVID-19 pandemic, the risk of co-infection and the burden it poses on healthcare system calls for timely influenza vaccination among pregnant women, who are the priority population recommended for vaccination. We aimed to evaluate the acceptance of influenza vaccination and associated factors among pregnant women during COVID-19 pandemic, provide evidence to improve influenza vaccination among pregnant women, help reduce the risk of infection and alleviate the burden of healthcare system for co-infected patients. METHODS: We conducted a multi-center cross-sectional study among pregnant women in China. Sociodemographic characteristics, health status, knowledge on influenza, attitude towards vaccination, and health beliefs were collected. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing regression analysis was used to evaluate the trends in the acceptance of influenza vaccine. Logistic regression was applied to identify factors associated with vaccination acceptance. RESULTS: The total acceptance rate was 76.5% (95%CI: 74.8-78.1%) among 2568 pregnant women enrolled. Only 8.3% of the participants had a history of seasonal influenza vaccination. In the logistic regression model, factors associated with the acceptance of influenza vaccine were western region, history of influenza vaccination, high knowledge of influenza infection and vaccination, high level of perceived susceptibility, perceived benefit, cues to action and low level of perceived barriers. Among 23.5% of the participants who had vaccine hesitancy, 48.0% of them were worried about side effect, 35.6% of them lacked confidence of vaccine safety. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlighted that tailored strategies and publicity for influenza vaccination in the context of COVID-19 pandemic are warranted to reduce pregnant women's concerns, improve their knowledge, expand vaccine uptake and alleviate pressure for healthcare system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza Vaccines/pharmacology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Vaccination/methods , Adult , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Belief Model , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 67, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497893

ABSTRACT

Adverse consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination which have been reported in scientific papers are varied. One possible but rare consequence is myocarditis, which may have a diversity of clinical manifestations. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who presented to the hospital for some syncope, 3 days after his first COVID-19 AstraZeneca Vaccination. Initial electrocardiogram (ECG) showed a long QT interval (QTc = 600 milliseconds). Laboratory tests revealed elevated troponin and lack of evidence of viral infection. Further investigations revealed the vaccine-induced myocarditis and arrhythmias linked to it. Within one week of magnesium treatment, the QT interval was completely corrected, and the patient discharged with no typical syncope attacks. This case like the previous reported one confirms that myocarditis is a complication of COVID-19 vaccine, but implies its clinical manifestations may be varied and even may happen after the single dose of vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Long QT Syndrome/etiology , Syncope/etiology , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Electrocardiography , Humans , Long QT Syndrome/diagnosis , Long QT Syndrome/drug therapy , Magnesium/administration & dosage , Male , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Myocarditis/etiology , Syncope/diagnosis , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccination/methods
8.
Dokl Biochem Biophys ; 496(1): 44-47, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495017

ABSTRACT

The high efficiency of using thermoheliox (inhalation with a high-temperature mixture of helium and oxygen) in the treatment of patients affected by COVID-19 was shown. The dynamics of accumulation of IgG, IgM, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with coronavirus infection in the "working" and control groups was studied experimentally. It was shown that thermoheliox intensifies the synthesis of IgG, IgM, and CRP antibodies, while eliminating the induction period on the kinetic curves of the synthesis of specific antibodies in the IgG form and transfers the synthesis of CRP to a fast phase. The results of experiments confirm the previously obtained data based on the analysis of the kinetic model of the development of coronaviral infection in the human body.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , C-Reactive Protein/biosynthesis , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity/immunology , Vaccination/methods , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Kinetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
9.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(10): e360-e363, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494047

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccines are paramount in the effort to end the coronavirus disease 2019 global epidemic. BNT162b2 is approved for the vaccination of adolescents over 16 years of age. Systemic adverse events were scarce though the pretested cohort of this age group was relatively small. The aim of the current study is to raise awareness for potential adverse reactions. METHODS: This is a case series of patients diagnosed with perimyocarditis following vaccination. Patients were compiled from 3 pediatric medical centers in Israel through a network of pediatricians and data regarding those cases was collected. In addition, incidence of perimyocarditis during the vaccination period was compared with previous years. RESULTS: All patients were males 16-18 years old, of Jewish descent, who presented with chest pain that began 1-3 days following vaccination (mean, 2.1 days). In 6 of the 7 patients, symptoms began following the 2nd dose and in 1 patient following the 1st dose. All cases were mild and none required cardiovascular or respiratory support. The incidence of perimyocarditis during the vaccination period was elevated in comparison to previous years. CONCLUSIONS: This case series describes a time association between coronavirus disease 2019 vaccine and perimyocarditis in adolescents. All cases were mild, although only long-term follow-up can reveal the true impact of this cardiac injury. While it seems that the incidence of perimyocarditis during the vaccination campaign period is increased, a more comprehensive data collection on a wider scale should be done. We hope this report will serve as a reminder to report events and allow for analysis of potential adverse reactions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Adolescent , Cohort Studies , Humans , Incidence , Israel , Male , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21308, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493219

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to present and evaluate novel oral vaccines, based on self-amplifying RNA lipid nanparticles (saRNA LNPs), saRNA transfected Lactobacillus plantarum LNPs, and saRNA transfected Lactobacillus plantarum, to neutralize severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) variants alpha and delta. After invitro evaluation of the oral vaccines on HEK293T/17 cells, we found that saRNA LNPs, saRNA transfected Lactobacillus plantarum LNPs, and saRNA transfected Lactobacillus plantarum could express S-protein at both mRNA and protein levels. In the next step, BALB/c mice were orally vaccinated with saRNA LNPs, saRNA transfected Lactobacillus plantarum LNPs, and saRNA transfected Lactobacillus plantarum at weeks 1 and 3. Importantly, a high titer of IgG and IgA was observed by all of them, sharply in week 6 (P < 0.05). In all study groups, their ratio of IgG2a/IgG1 was upper 1, indicating Th1-biased responses. Wild-type viral neutralization assay showed that the secreted antibodies in vaccinated mice and recovered COVID-19 patients could neutralize SARS-COV-2 variants alpha and delta. After oral administration of oral vaccines, biodistribution assay was done. It was found that all of them had the same biodistribution pattern. The highest concentration of S-protein was seen in the small intestine, followed by the large intestine and liver.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Lactobacillus plantarum/genetics , Lipids/chemistry , Nanoparticles/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transfection/methods , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Administration, Oral , Adult , Animals , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacokinetics , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/blood , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Intestine, Small/metabolism , Lactobacillus plantarum/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Middle Aged , Models, Animal , Neutralization Tests , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Tissue Distribution
12.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(45)2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475573

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and other pathogens with pandemic potential requires safe, protective, inexpensive, and easily accessible vaccines that can be developed and manufactured rapidly at a large scale. DNA vaccines can achieve these criteria, but induction of strong immune responses has often required bulky, expensive electroporation devices. Here, we report an ultra-low-cost (<1 USD), handheld (<50 g) electroporation system utilizing a microneedle electrode array ("ePatch") for DNA vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. The low cost and small size are achieved by combining a thumb-operated piezoelectric pulser derived from a common household stove lighter that emits microsecond, bipolar, oscillatory electric pulses and a microneedle electrode array that targets delivery of high electric field strength pulses to the skin's epidermis. Antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 induced by this electroporation system in mice were strong and enabled at least 10-fold dose sparing compared to conventional intramuscular or intradermal injection of the DNA vaccine. Vaccination was well tolerated with mild, transient effects on the skin. This ePatch system is easily portable, without any battery or other power source supply, offering an attractive, inexpensive approach for rapid and accessible DNA vaccination to combat COVID-19, as well as other epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Electroporation/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Costs and Cost Analysis , Electroporation/economics , Electroporation/methods , Equipment Design , Female , Genes, Reporter , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Microelectrodes , Needles , Pandemics/prevention & control , Proof of Concept Study , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Skin/immunology , Skin/metabolism , Transfection , Vaccination/economics , Vaccination/instrumentation , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, DNA/genetics , Vaccines, DNA/immunology
13.
Cell ; 184(20): 5077-5081, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474390

ABSTRACT

As the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic evolves, new variants continue to emerge. Some highly transmissible variants, such as Delta, also raised concerns about the effectiveness provided by current vaccines. Understanding immunological correlates of protection and how laboratory findings correspond to clinical effectiveness is imperative to shape future vaccination strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/classification , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
14.
Elife ; 102021 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468709

ABSTRACT

Age is the major risk factor for mortality after SARS-CoV-2 infection and older people have received priority consideration for COVID-19 vaccination. However, vaccine responses are often suboptimal in this age group and few people over the age of 80 years were included in vaccine registration trials. We determined the serological and cellular response to spike protein in 100 people aged 80-96 years at 2 weeks after the second vaccination with the Pfizer BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. Antibody responses were seen in every donor with high titers in 98%. Spike-specific cellular immune responses were detectable in only 63% and correlated with humoral response. Previous SARS-CoV-2 infection substantially increased antibody responses after one vaccine and antibody and cellular responses remained 28-fold and 3-fold higher, respectively, after dual vaccination. Post-vaccine sera mediated strong neutralization of live Victoria infection and although neutralization titers were reduced 14-fold against the P.1 variant first discovered in Brazil they remained largely effective. These data demonstrate that the mRNA vaccine platform delivers strong humoral immunity in people up to 96 years of age and retains broad efficacy against the P.1 variant of concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , RNA, Messenger/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Age Factors , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Immunity, Cellular , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Male , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination/methods
16.
J Hepatol ; 75(2): 439-441, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454288

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The development of COVID-19 vaccines has progressed with encouraging safety and efficacy data. Concerns have been raised about SARS-CoV-2 vaccine responses in the large population of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The study aimed to explore the safety and immunogenicity of COVID-19 vaccination in NAFLD. METHODS: This multicenter study included patients with NAFLD without a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection. All patients were vaccinated with 2 doses of inactivated vaccine against SARS-CoV-2. The primary safety outcome was the incidence of adverse reactions within 7 days after each injection and overall incidence of adverse reactions within 28 days, and the primary immunogenicity outcome was neutralizing antibody response at least 14 days after the whole-course vaccination. RESULTS: A total of 381 patients with pre-existing NAFLD were included from 11 designated centers in China. The median age was 39.0 years (IQR 33.0-48.0 years) and 179 (47.0%) were male. The median BMI was 26.1 kg/m2 (IQR 23.8-28.1 kg/m2). The number of adverse reactions within 7 days after each injection and adverse reactions within 28 days totaled 95 (24.9%) and 112 (29.4%), respectively. The most common adverse reactions were injection site pain in 70 (18.4%), followed by muscle pain in 21 (5.5%), and headache in 20 (5.2%). All adverse reactions were mild and self-limiting, and no grade 3 adverse reactions were recorded. Notably, neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were detected in 364 (95.5%) patients with NAFLD. The median neutralizing antibody titer was 32 (IQR 8-64), and the neutralizing antibody titers were maintained. CONCLUSIONS: The inactivated COVID-19 vaccine appears to be safe with good immunogenicity in patients with NAFLD. LAY SUMMARY: The development of vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has progressed rapidly, with encouraging safety and efficacy data. This study now shows that the inactivated COVID-19 vaccine appears to be safe with good immunogenicity in the large population of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/diagnosis , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccination/methods , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects
17.
J Hepatol ; 75(2): 435-438, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454287

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Two SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines were approved to prevent COVID-19 infection, with reported vaccine efficacy of 95%. Liver transplant (LT) recipients are at risk of lower vaccine immunogenicity and were not included in the registration trials. We assessed vaccine immunogenicity and safety in this special population. METHODS: LT recipients followed at the Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and healthy volunteers were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies directed against the Spike-protein (S) and Nucleocapsid-protein (N) 10-20 days after receiving the second Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 SARS-CoV-2 vaccine dose. Information regarding vaccine side effects and clinical data was collected from patients and medical records. RESULTS: Eighty LT recipients were enrolled. Mean age was 60 years and 30% were female. Twenty-five healthy volunteer controls were younger (mean age 52.7 years, p = 0.013) and mostly female (68%, p = 0.002). All participants were negative for IgG N-protein serology, indicating immunity did not result from prior COVID-19 infection. All controls were positive for IgG S-protein serology. Immunogenicity among LT recipients was significantly lower with positive serology in only 47.5% (p <0.001). Antibody titer was also significantly lower in this group (mean 95.41 AU/ml vs. 200.5 AU/ml in controls, p <0.001). Predictors for negative response among LT recipients were older age, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate, and treatment with high dose steroids and mycophenolate mofetil. No serious adverse events were reported in either group. CONCLUSION: LT recipients developed substantially lower immunological response to the Pfizer-BioNTech SARS-CoV-2 mRNA-based vaccine. Factors influencing serological antibody responses include age, renal function and immunosuppressive medications. The findings require re-evaluation of vaccine regimens in this population. LAY SUMMARY: The Pfizer-BioNTech BNT162b2 SARS-CoV-2 vaccine elicited substantially inferior immunity in liver transplant recipients. Less than half of the patients developed sufficient levels of antibodies against the virus, and in those who were positive, average antibody levels were 2x less compared to healthy controls. Factors predicting non-response were older age, renal function and immunosuppressive medications.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Liver Transplantation/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunosuppression/methods , Israel/epidemiology , Kidney Function Tests , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serologic Tests/methods , Serologic Tests/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccination/methods
18.
Eur J Cancer ; 157: 441-449, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450100

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with cancer are presumed a frail group at high risk of contracting coronavirus disease (COVID-19), and vaccination represents a cornerstone in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic. However, data on COVID-19 vaccination in cancer patients are fragmentary and poor. METHODS: An observational study was conducted to evaluate the seropositivity rate and safety of a two-dose regimen of the BNT162b2 or messenger RNA-1273 vaccine in adult patients with solid cancer undergoing active anticancer treatment or whose treatment had been terminated within 6 months of the start of the study. The control group was composed of healthy volunteers. Serum samples were evaluated for SARS-COV-2 antibodies before vaccinations and 2-6 weeks after the administration of the second vaccine dose. Primary end-point: seropositivity rate. Secondary end-points: safety, factors influencing seroconversion, IgG titers of patients versus healthy volunteers, COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Between 20th March 2021 and 12th June 2021, 293 consecutive patients with cancer-solid tumours underwent a program of COVID-19 vaccinations; of these, 2 patients refused vaccination, 13 patients did not receive the second dose of the vaccine because of cancer progression, and 21 patients had COVID-19 antibodies at baseline and were excluded. The 257 evaluable patients had a median age of 65 years (range 28-86), 66.15% with metastatic disease. Primary end-point: seropositivity rate in patients was 75.88% versus 100% in the control group. Secondary end-points: no Grade 3-4 side-effects, no COVID-19 infections were reported. Patients median IgG titer was significantly lower than in the control group; male sex and active anticancer therapy influenced negative seroconversion. BNT162b2 or messenger RNA-1273 vaccines were immunogenic in cancer patients, showing good safety profile.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/methods
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