Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 414
Filter
1.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(4): 570-578, 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237020

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Unvaccinated emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are at increased risk of contracting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and potentially transmitting the virus to their families, coworkers, and patients. Effective vaccines for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus exist; however, vaccination rates among EMS professionals remain largely unknown. Consequently, we sought to document vaccination rates of EMS professionals and identify predictors of vaccination uptake. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of North Carolina EMS professionals after the COVID-19 vaccines were widely available. The survey assessed vaccination status as well as beliefs regarding COVID-19 illness and vaccine effectiveness. Prediction of vaccine uptake was modeled using logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 860 EMS professionals completed the survey, of whom 74.7% reported receiving the COVID-19 vaccination. Most respondents believed that COVID-19 is a serious threat to the population, that they are personally at higher risk of infection, that vaccine side effects are outweighed by illness prevention, and the vaccine is safe and effective. Despite this, only 18.7% supported mandatory vaccination for EMS professionals. Statistically significant differences were observed between the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups regarding vaccine safety and effectiveness, recall of employer vaccine recommendation, perceived risk of infection, degree of threat to the population, and trust in government to take actions to limit the spread of disease. Unvaccinated respondents cited reasons such as belief in personal health and natural immunity as protectors against infection, concerns about vaccine safety and effectiveness, inadequate vaccine knowledge, and lack of an employer mandate for declining the vaccine. Predictors of vaccination included belief in vaccine safety (odds ratio [OR] 5.5, P=<0.001) and effectiveness (OR 4.6, P=<0.001); importance of vaccination to protect patients (OR 15.5, P=<0.001); perceived personal risk of infection (OR 1.8, P=0.04); previous receipt of influenza vaccine (OR 2.5, P=0.003); and sufficient knowledge to make an informed decision about vaccination (OR 2.4, P=0.024). CONCLUSION: In this survey of EMS professionals, over a quarter remained unvaccinated for COVID-19. Given the identified predictors of vaccine acceptance, EMS systems should focus on countering misinformation through employee educational campaigns as well as on developing policies regarding workforce immunization requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Health Personnel , Vaccination , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies , Decision Making , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Surveys , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , North Carolina , Occupational Health , Patient Safety , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
2.
Health Psychol ; 42(7): 496-509, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233316

ABSTRACT

The development of effective interventions for COVID-19 vaccination has proven challenging given the unique and evolving determinants of that behavior. A tailored intervention to drive vaccination uptake through machine learning-enabled personalization of behavior change messages unexpectedly yielded a high volume of real-time short message service (SMS) feedback from recipients. A qualitative analysis of those replies contributes to a better understanding of the barriers to COVID-19 vaccination and demographic variations in determinants, supporting design improvements for vaccination interventions. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine unsolicited replies to a text message intervention for COVID-19 vaccination to understand the types of barriers experienced and any relationships between recipient demographics, intervention content, and reply type. METHOD: We categorized SMS replies into 22 overall themes. Interrater agreement was very good (all κpooled > 0.62). Chi-square analyses were used to understand demographic variations in reply types and which messaging types were most related to reply types. RESULTS: In total, 10,948 people receiving intervention text messages sent 17,090 replies. Most frequent reply types were "already vaccinated" (31.1%), attempts to unsubscribe (25.4%), and "will not get vaccinated" (12.7%). Within "already vaccinated" and "will not get vaccinated" replies, significant differences were observed in the demographics of those replying against expected base rates, all p > .001. Of those stating they would not vaccinate, 34% of the replies involved mis-/disinformation, suggesting that a determinant of vaccination involves nonvalidated COVID-19 beliefs. CONCLUSIONS: Insights from unsolicited replies can enhance our ability to identify appropriate intervention techniques to influence COVID-19 vaccination behaviors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Qualitative Research , Text Messaging , Vaccination , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Machine Learning , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Demography , Anti-Vaccination Movement/psychology , Behavioral Sciences , COVID-19/prevention & control
3.
PLoS One ; 18(6): e0286799, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243275

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Achieving high COVID-19 vaccine booster coverage is an ongoing global challenge. Health authorities need evidence about effective communication interventions to improve acceptance and uptake. This study aimed to test effects of persuasive messages about COVID-19 vaccine booster doses on intention to vaccinate amongst eligible adults in Australia. METHODS: In this online randomised controlled trial, adult participants received one of four intervention messages or a control message. The control message provided information about booster dose eligibility. Intervention messages added to the control message, each using a different persuasive strategy, including: emphasising personal health benefits of booster doses, community health benefits, non-health benefits, and personal agency in choosing vaccination. After the intervention, participants answered items about COVID-19 booster vaccine intention and beliefs. Intervention groups were compared to the control using tests of two proportions; differences of ≥5 percentage points were deemed clinically significant. A sub-group analysis was conducted among hesitant participants. RESULTS: Of the 487 consenting and randomised participants, 442 (90.8%) completed the experiment and were included in the analysis. Participants viewing messages emphasising non-health benefits had the highest intention compared to those who viewed the control message (percentage point diff: 9.0, 95% CI -0.8, 18.8, p = 0.071). Intention was even higher among hesitant individuals in this intervention group compared to the control group (percentage point diff: 15.6, 95% CI -6.0, 37.3, p = 0.150). Conversely, intention was lower among hesitant individuals who viewed messages emphasising personal agency compared to the control group (percentage point diff: -10.8, 95% CI -33.0, 11.4, p = 0.330), although evidence in support of these findings is weak. CONCLUSION: Health authorities should highlight non-health benefits to encourage COVID-19 vaccine booster uptake but use messages emphasising personal agency with caution. These findings can inform communication message development and strategies to improve COVID-19 vaccine booster uptake. Clinical trial registration: Registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12622001404718); trial webpage: https://www.anzctr.org.au/ACTRN12622001404718.aspx.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccination , Adult , Humans , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Intention , Vaccination/psychology , Persuasive Communication
4.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 423, 2023 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2318194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While many healthcare providers (HCPs) have navigated patients' vaccine concerns and questions prior to the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccines, sentiments surrounding the COVID-19 vaccines have presented new and distinct challenges. OBJECTIVE: To understand the provider experience of counseling patients about COVID-19 vaccinations, aspects of the pandemic environment that impacted vaccine trust, and communication strategies providers found supportive of patient vaccine education. METHODS: 7 focus groups of healthcare providers were conducted and recorded during December 2021 and January 2022, at the height of the Omicron wave in the United States. Recordings were transcribed, and iterative coding and analysis was applied. RESULTS: 44 focus group participants representing 24 US states with the majority (80%) fully vaccinated at the time of data collection. Most participants were doctors (34%) or physician's assistants and nurse practitioners (34%). The negative impact of COVID-19 misinformation on patient-provider communication at both intrapersonal and interpersonal levels as well as barriers and facilitators to patient vaccine uptake are reported. People or sources that play a role in health communication ("messengers") and persuasive messages that impact behavior or attitudes towards vaccination ("messages") are described. Providers expressed frustration in the need to continuously address vaccine misinformation in clinical appointments among patients who remained unvaccinated. Many providers found value in resources that provided up-to-date and evidence-based information as COVID-19 guidelines continued to change. Additionally, providers indicated that patient-facing materials designed to support vaccination education were not frequently available, but they were the most valuable to providers in a changing information environment. CONCLUSIONS: While vaccine decision-making is complex and hinges on diverse factors such as health care access (i.e., convenience, expense) and individual knowledge, providers can play a major role in navigating these factors with their patients. But to strengthen provider vaccine communication and promote vaccine uptake, a comprehensive communication infrastructure must be sustained to support the patient-provider dyad. The findings provide recommendations to maintain an environment that facilitates effective provider-patient communication at the community, organizational and policy levels. There is a need for a unified multisectoral response to reinforce the recommendations in patient settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Vaccines , Humans , United States , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Health Personnel/psychology , Vaccination/psychology
5.
PeerJ ; 11: e14727, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300126

ABSTRACT

Background: Globally, there is an increased risk of COVID-19 infection among front-line health workers (FHW). This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and practices of FHW of Pakistan after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. Methods: A population web-based survey on COVID-19 vaccine was conducted on 635 FHW in Pakistan between April 15, 2021, and July 15, 2021. The survey focused on four main sections consisting of socio-demographic data, knowledge, attitude, and practices after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. The data was analyzed on SPSS. p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Overall, 60% of FHW were nervous before getting vaccinated, with the leading reason to get vaccinated being their concern to protect themselves and their community (53.4%). A majority of FHW had fear about the unseen side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine (59.7%) used in Pakistan, with the most common side effect reported as soreness at the injection site (39%). It has been noted that almost all of the FHW observed preventive practices after getting vaccinated. The results showed that married respondents had favorable practices towards COVID-19 vaccines (B = 0.53, p < 0.01) (B, unstandardized regression coefficient). It was also found that more informational sources (B = 0.19, p < 0.01), higher knowledge of vaccination (B = 0.15, p < 0.001), and favorable attitude toward vaccine (B = 0.12, p < 0.001) significantly predicted favorable practices toward COVID-19 vaccination. Conclusion: The findings reflect that FHW, though they were worried about its side effects, have good knowledge and a positive attitude after getting the COVID-19 vaccine. This study is significant as the FHWs are a symbol for guidance, a reliable source of information, and an encouraging means of receiving COVID-19 vaccine for the general public. This study also reported that post-vaccination side effects were mild which will aid in reducing the vaccine hesitancy among the general Pakistani population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pakistan/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology
6.
Psychol Sci ; 34(5): 603-615, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2299744

ABSTRACT

This study highlights the role of psychological influences in triggering and amplifying the adverse effects of the COVID-19 vaccine (i.e., nocebo effects). Fear, beliefs, and expectations about the COVID-19 vaccine, trust in health and scientific institutions, and stable personality traits were measured in 315 adult Italian citizens (145 men) during the 15-min waiting time after vaccination. The occurrence and severity of 10 potential adverse effects were assessed 24 hr later. Nonpharmacological variables predicted nearly 30% of the severity of the vaccine's adverse effects. Expectations are important determinants of adverse effects from vaccines, and the results of the path analyses show that these expectations stem primarily from people's vaccine beliefs and attitudes, which can be changed. Implications for increasing vaccine acceptability and limiting the nocebo effect are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Nocebo Effect , Vaccination , Adult , Humans , Male , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Fear , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Trust , Vaccination/psychology
8.
Public Health ; 219: 22-30, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2294269

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We analyze the dynamics of the mental well-being of the Chilean population in response to the progress of the vaccination strategy implemented by the government. STUDY DESIGN: This study aims at investigating the possibility of using Google Trends as an instrument for tracking mental well-being of the Chilean population. METHODS: We use the volume of searches for keywords in Google Trends (GT) related to Anguish, Anxiety, Depression, and Stress as a proxy for population well-being. Using event study methods, we analyze social attention reactions to news about the vaccination program. We implement a Difference-in-Difference-in-Differences estimation to estimate changes in population welfare by socio-economic status induced by the progress of inoculation. RESULTS: We show that social attention to mental health problems is sensitive to news about the vaccination program. Moreover, and most importantly, we find that mental well-being responds positively to the percentage of inoculated people. This phenomenon appear to be permanent and affected by socio-economic status, with the wealthier population experiencing greater improvements than the less wealthy. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 vaccination program in Chile, social attention to mental health problems appears to be sensitive to news about the vaccination program. There is also strong evidence of socio-economic status-induced heterogeneity in population responses to program implementation. The above phenomena appears to be permanent and cannot be attributed to either socio-economic segregation in access to vaccines or to the highly stratified schedule of the vaccination program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Chile/epidemiology , Search Engine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology
9.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2196914, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305910

ABSTRACT

Evidence is limited on the actual uptake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine among older adults, especially those with chronic diseases, during the pandemic. To examine COVID-19 vaccine uptake, reasons, and associated factor among older adults, a cross-sectional survey was conducted between September 24 and October 20, 2021 among older adults aged 60 and above in Shenzhen, China. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations of COVID-19 vaccine uptake with sociodemographic characteristics, pneumonia vaccination history, and participation in health education activities among older adults and among those with chronic diseases. Of the 951 participants, 82.8% reported being vaccinated against COVID-19 during the study period, but this proportion was relatively lower among adults aged 80 and above (62.7%) and those with chronic diseases (77.9%). The top-rated reasons for not being vaccinated included doctors not recommending it due to underlying diseases (34.1%), not being ready for it (18.3%), and failure to make an appointment (9.1%). General older adults who were aged below 70, had a high school and above education, were permanent residents of Shenzhen, were with good health and had pneumonia vaccination history were more likely to take the COVID-19 vaccination. Yet, among older adults with chronic diseases, other than age and permanent residency status, health status was the only significant indicator of COVID-19 vaccine uptake. Our study added to evidence that health condition is the critical barrier to the actual uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine among Chinese older adults, especially those aged 80 and above and those with chronic diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccination , Aged , Humans , Asian People , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Aged, 80 and over
10.
Swiss Med Wkly ; 151: w20508, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2272094

ABSTRACT

AIMS OF THE STUDY: The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to overlap with the seasonal influenza epidemic, increasing the risk of overextending the health system capacity in Switzerland. Influenza vaccine uptake has remained low in most countries, including Switzerland. The aim of the study was to determine parents’ intentions towards influenza vaccination of their children, as well as themselves, and to assess regional differences. METHODS: Parents presenting to four paediatric emergency departments (Zurich, Bern, Bellinzona, Geneva) were asked to complete an online survey during and after the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic (April to June 2020). The anonymised survey included demographic information, vaccination history and intentions to vaccinate against influenza, as well as attitudes towards future vaccination against COVID-19. RESULTS: The majority of children (92%; 602/654) were up-to-date on their vaccination schedule. In 2019/2020, 7.2% (47/654) were vaccinated against influenza. Children with chronic illnesses were more frequently vaccinated than healthy children (19.2% vs 5.6%; p = 0.002). For the coming winter season, 111 (17%) parents stated they plan to vaccinate their children against influenza, more than double the rate from last year, and 383 (59.2%) parents suggested they will vaccinate against COVID-19 once a vaccine is available. Regional differences between “German” and “Latin” Switzerland were found for parents’ intent to have their children vaccinated against influenza next season (Zurich and Bern 14.3%, Bellinzona and Geneva 27.2%, p <0.001), but not for a hypothetical vaccination against COVID-19 (Zurich and Bern 59.1%, Bellinzona and Geneva 59.7%, p = 0.894). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a substantial increase of parents’ intention to vaccinate their children against influenza, especially in hard-hit “Latin” Switzerland. The Swiss government and public health organisations can leverage these regional results to promote influenza vaccination among children for the coming seasons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Child , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Intention , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Switzerland
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268033

ABSTRACT

To date, we know little about COVID-19-related health literacy among school leaders, particularly in East Asia. The present study aimed to assess the level of COVID-19-related health literacy and associated factors (vaccine hesitancy, self-endangering behaviour, and work satisfaction) among school leaders in Hong Kong. A cross-sectional study of 259 school leaders was carried out during the COVID-19 pandemic between April 2021 and February 2022. COVID-19-related health literacy using HLS-COVID-Q22, three subscales of self-endangering work behaviour scales (i.e., "extensification of work", "intensification of work" and "quality reduction"), and two dimensions of Burnout Assessment Tool (BAT) (i.e., psychosomatic complaints and exhaustion) were used. The study employed independent sample t-test, ANOVA, and multilinear regression models. The findings show that more than half (53.7%) of school leaders had insufficient health literacy. Participants with insufficient health literacy scored significantly higher in the following factors: exhaustion related to work situation (p = 0.029), psychosomatic complaints (p < 0.001), attitude about vaccination (i.e., less agree with vaccination) (p < 0.001), level of informing on COVID-19 related information (i.e., felt less informed) (p < 0.001), and level of confusion about COVID-19-related information (i.e., felt more confused) (p < 0.001). In a linear regression model predicting attitude about coronavirus vaccination, age (ß, -0.188, 95% CI, -0.024, -0.005, p = 0.002) and health literacy (ß, -0.395, 95% CI, -0.716, -0.361, p < 0.001) were the negative predictors, F(5, 214) = 11.859, p < 0.001. For the linear regression model adjusted for sex and age for predicting health literacy, the model was insignificant. Despite being a highly educated group, this study reveals that one in two Hong Kong school leaders have insufficient health literacy. Inadequate health literacy was strongly associated with a negative attitude about vaccination, low information, and confusion about COVID-19-related information. Additionally, insufficient health literacy was associated with the two secondary symptoms of burnouts. The study highlights an urgent need to develop intervention programmes to promote the COVID-19-specific as well as overall health literacy of the school leaders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Schools , Vaccination/psychology
12.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604096, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2254588

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To examine the association between quarantine duration and psychological outcomes, social distancing, as well as vaccination intention during the second outbreak of COVID-19 in China. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in January 2021. Participants were invited to complete the measurement of quarantine duration, social distancing, psychological distress, wellbeing (WHO-5), and vaccination intention. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were performed to examine the relationship between quarantine duration and psychological distress, wellbeing, social distancing, and vaccination intention. Results: Of the 944 participants, 17.2% of the participants experienced quarantine. Quarantine for 1-7 days increased the social distancing (ß = 2.61 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.90-3.33) and vaccination intention (OR = 2.16 95% CI 1.22-3.82). Quarantine for >7 days was associated with the increased social distancing (ß = 3.00 95% CI 2.37-3.64) and psychological distress (ß = 1.03 95% CI 0.22-1.86), and decreased wellbeing (ß = 1.27 95% CI 0.29-2.26). Conclusion: Longer quarantine duration showed increased social distancing, increased psychological distress, and decreased wellbeing. Quarantine for 1-7 days was associated with increased vaccination intention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Intention , Physical Distancing , Vaccination/psychology
13.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 119(21): e2116311119, 2022 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251528

ABSTRACT

Does local partisan context influence the adoption of prosocial behavior? Using a nationwide survey of 60,000 adults and geographic data on over 180 million registered voters, we investigate whether neighborhood partisan composition affects a publicly observable and politicized behavior: wearing a mask. We find that Republicans are less likely to wear masks in public as the share of Republicans in their zip codes increases. Democratic mask wearing, however, is unaffected by local partisan context. Consequently, the partisan gap in mask wearing is largest in Republican neighborhoods, and less apparent in Democratic areas. These effects are distinct from other contextual effects such as variations in neighborhood race, income, or education. In contrast, partisan context has significantly reduced influence on unobservable public health recommendations like COVID-19 vaccination and no influence on nonpoliticized behaviors like flu vaccination, suggesting that differences in mask wearing reflect the publicly observable and politicized nature of the behavior instead of underlying differences in dispositions toward medical care.


Subject(s)
Altruism , COVID-19 , Masks , Politics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Mass Behavior , United States , Vaccination/psychology
14.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2186108, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277221

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has wreaked havoc across the globe for approximately three years. Vaccination is a key factor to ending this pandemic, but its protective effect diminishes over time. A second booster dose at the right time is needed. To explore the willingness to receive the fourth dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and its influencing factors, we commenced a national, cross-sectional and anonymous survey in mainland China among people aged 18 and above from October 24 to November 7, 2022. A total of 3,224 respondents were eventually included. The acceptance rate of the fourth dose was 81.1% (95% CI: 79.8-82.5%), while it was 72.6% (95% CI: 71.1-74.2%) for a heterologous booster. Confidence in current domestic situation and the effectiveness of previous vaccinations, and uncertainty about extra protection were the main reasons for vaccine hesitancy. Perceived benefit (aOR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.159-1.40) and cues to action (aOR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.60-1.88) were positively associated with the vaccine acceptance, whereas perceived barriers (aOR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.72-0.84) and self-efficacy (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.71-0.89) were both negatively associated with it. Additionally, sex, age, COVID-19 vaccination history, time for social media, and satisfaction with the government's response to COVID-19 were also factors affecting vaccination intention. Factors influencing the intention of heterologous booster were similar to the above results. It is of profound theoretical and practical significance to clarify the population's willingness to vaccinate in advance and explore the relevant influencing factors for the subsequent development and promotion of the fourth-dose vaccination strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccination , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Data Collection , East Asian People , Vaccination/psychology
15.
J Commun Healthc ; 16(1): 62-74, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guided by the 5C (confidence, complacency, constraints, calculation, and collective responsibility) model of vaccination behavior, we examine the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance (i.e. attitudes and intentions toward COVID-19 vaccination) among Black Americans, a group disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. METHOD: We conducted a national survey of Black Americans (N = 1,497) in February/March 2021. RESULTS: We found that, among the five psychological antecedents, three (confidence, calculation - or extensive information searching, and collective responsibility) significantly predicted attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination and had indirect effects on vaccination intentions through vaccination attitudes. Two antecedents (confidence and collective responsibility) also directly predicted vaccination intentions. Our analysis suggests that a partially mediated model produced better fit than a fully mediated model. CONCLUSIONS: Developing culturally tailored interventions for Black Americans that build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines, highlight collective responsibility, and attend to Black Americans' information sources is key to boosting Black Americans' COVID-19 vaccine acceptance. Future research is needed to understand how historical and ongoing racism affects the psychological antecedents of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among Black Americans.


Subject(s)
Black or African American , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination , Humans , Communication , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Vaccination/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2282773

ABSTRACT

Vaccine uptake is considered as one of the most effective methods of defending against COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019). However, many young adults are hesitant regarding COVID-19 vaccines, and they actually play an important role in virus transmission. Based on a multi-theory model, this study aims to explore the influencing factors related to COVID-19 vaccine willingness among young adults in China. Using semi-structured interviews, this study explored the factors that would motivate young adults with vaccine hesitancy to get the COVID-19 vaccine. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the interview data with topic modeling as a complementarity method. After comparing the differences and similarities of results generated by thematic analysis and topic modeling, this study ultimately identified ten key factors related to COVID-19 vaccination intention, including the effectiveness and safety of vaccines, application range of vaccine, etc. This study combined thematic analysis with machine learning and provided a comprehensive and nuanced picture of facilitating factors for COVID-19 vaccine uptake among Chinese young adults. Results may be taken as potential themes for authorities and public health workers in vaccination campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination , Humans , Young Adult , Asian People , China , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Vaccination/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology
18.
Public Health Rep ; 138(3): 422-427, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2280282

ABSTRACT

Limited studies are available on how decisions and perceptions on SARS-CoV-2 vaccination have changed since the start of vaccination availability. We performed a qualitative study to identify factors critical to SARS-CoV-2 vaccination decision making and how perspectives evolved among African American/Black, Native American, and Hispanic communities disproportionately affected by COVID-19 and social and economic disadvantage. We conducted 16 virtual meetings, with 232 participants in wave 1 meetings (December 2020) and with 206 returning participants in wave 2 meetings (January and February 2021). Wave 1 vaccine concerns in all communities included information needs, vaccine safety, and speed of vaccine development. Lack of trust in government and the pharmaceutical industry was influential, particularly among African American/Black and Native American participants. Participants showed more willingness to get vaccinated at wave 2 than at wave 1, indicating that many of their information needs had been addressed. Hesitancy remained greater among African American/Black and Native American participants than among Hispanic participants. Participants in all groups indicated that conversations tailored to their community and with those most trustworthy to them would be helpful. To overcome vaccine hesitancy, we propose a model of fully considered SARS-CoV-2 vaccine decision making, whereby public health departments supply information, align with community values and recognize lived experiences, offer support for decision making, and make vaccination easy and convenient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Decision Making , Humans , American Indian or Alaska Native/psychology , Black or African American/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Hispanic or Latino/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/psychology
19.
Vaccine ; 41(15): 2562-2571, 2023 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A high rate of COVID-19 vaccination is critical to reduce morbidity and mortality related to infection and to control the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the factors that influence vaccine confidence can inform policies and programs aimed at vaccine promotion. We examined the impact of health literacy on COVID-19 vaccine confidence among a diverse sample of adults living in two major metropolitan areas. METHODS: Questionnaire data from adults participating in an observational study conducted in Boston and Chicago from September 2018 through March 2021 were examined using path analyses to determine whether health literacy mediates the relationship between demographic variables and vaccine confidence, as measured by an adapted Vaccine Confidence Index (aVCI). RESULTS: Participants (N = 273) were on average 49 years old, 63 % female, 4 % non-Hispanic Asian, 25 % Hispanic, 30 % non-Hispanic white, and 40 % non-Hispanic Black. Using non-Hispanic white and other race as the reference category, Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with lower aVCI (-0.76, 95 % CI -1.00 to -0.50; -0.52, 95 % CI -0.80 to -0.27, total effects from a model excluding other covariates). Lower education was also associated with lower aVCI (using college or more as the reference, -0.73 for 12th grade or less, 95 % CI -0.93 to -0.47; -0.73 for some college/associate's/technical degree, 95 % CI -1.05 to -0.39). Health literacy partially mediated these effects for Black and Hispanic participants and those with lower education (indirect effects -0.19 and -0.19 for Black race and Hispanic ethnicity; 0.27 for 12th grade or less; -0.15 for some college/associate's/technical degree). CONCLUSIONS: Lower levels of education, Black race, and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with lower scores on health literacy, which in turn were associated with lower vaccine confidence. Our findings suggest that efforts to improve health literacy may improve vaccine confidence, which in turn may improve vaccination rates and vaccine equity. CLINICAL TRIALS NUMBER: NCT03584490.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Vaccination , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Black or African American , Boston/epidemiology , Chicago/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Hispanic or Latino , White , Vaccination/psychology
20.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0276238, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2267059

ABSTRACT

Increased misinformation circulating among the population during the COVID-10 pandemic can trigger rejection to take up vaccines. This study assesses the influence of vaccine information and other factors on vaccine acceptance in the Thai population. Between March and August 2021, six rounds of cross-sectional surveys through village health volunteer networks and online channels were conducted; as well as qualitative interviews with frontline health workers, patients with chronic diseases, and religious believers and leaders. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression with 95% level of confidence were used for survey findings while deductive thematic analysis was used for in-depth interview findings. Among the total 193,744 respondents, the initial COVID-19 vaccine acceptance rate decreased from 60.3% in March 2021 to 44.0% in April 2021, then increased to 88.8% in August 2021. Participants who were able to differentiate true and false statements were 1.2 to 2.4 times more likely to accept vaccine than those who were not. Those who perceived a high risk of infection (Adjusted odds ratio; AOR = 2.6-4.7), perceived vaccine safety (AOR = 1.4-2.4), judged the importance of vaccination (AOR = 2.3-5.1), and had trust in vaccine manufacture (AOR = 1.9-3.2) were also more likely to accept the vaccine. Moreover, higher education (AOR = 1.6-4.1) and living in outbreak areas (AOR = 1.4-3.0) were significantly related to vaccine uptake, except in people with chronic diseases who tended not to accept the vaccine (AOR = 0.7-0.9). This study recommends effective infodemic management and comprehensive public communication, prioritising vulnerable groups such as those with a low level of education and people with chronic conditions. Communication through reliable channels can support higher vaccine acceptance and rapid vaccine rollout. Finally, regular monitoring of misinformation is important such as fact checking support, timely legal actions and specific debunking communication.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Vaccination , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Southeast Asian People , Vaccination/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL