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1.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(4): 570-578, 2022 Jul 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237020

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Unvaccinated emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are at increased risk of contracting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and potentially transmitting the virus to their families, coworkers, and patients. Effective vaccines for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus exist; however, vaccination rates among EMS professionals remain largely unknown. Consequently, we sought to document vaccination rates of EMS professionals and identify predictors of vaccination uptake. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of North Carolina EMS professionals after the COVID-19 vaccines were widely available. The survey assessed vaccination status as well as beliefs regarding COVID-19 illness and vaccine effectiveness. Prediction of vaccine uptake was modeled using logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 860 EMS professionals completed the survey, of whom 74.7% reported receiving the COVID-19 vaccination. Most respondents believed that COVID-19 is a serious threat to the population, that they are personally at higher risk of infection, that vaccine side effects are outweighed by illness prevention, and the vaccine is safe and effective. Despite this, only 18.7% supported mandatory vaccination for EMS professionals. Statistically significant differences were observed between the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups regarding vaccine safety and effectiveness, recall of employer vaccine recommendation, perceived risk of infection, degree of threat to the population, and trust in government to take actions to limit the spread of disease. Unvaccinated respondents cited reasons such as belief in personal health and natural immunity as protectors against infection, concerns about vaccine safety and effectiveness, inadequate vaccine knowledge, and lack of an employer mandate for declining the vaccine. Predictors of vaccination included belief in vaccine safety (odds ratio [OR] 5.5, P=<0.001) and effectiveness (OR 4.6, P=<0.001); importance of vaccination to protect patients (OR 15.5, P=<0.001); perceived personal risk of infection (OR 1.8, P=0.04); previous receipt of influenza vaccine (OR 2.5, P=0.003); and sufficient knowledge to make an informed decision about vaccination (OR 2.4, P=0.024). CONCLUSION: In this survey of EMS professionals, over a quarter remained unvaccinated for COVID-19. Given the identified predictors of vaccine acceptance, EMS systems should focus on countering misinformation through employee educational campaigns as well as on developing policies regarding workforce immunization requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Health Personnel , Vaccination , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Cross-Sectional Studies , Decision Making , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Surveys , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , North Carolina , Occupational Health , Patient Safety , Vaccination/legislation & jurisprudence , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
2.
Health Psychol ; 42(7): 496-509, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233316

ABSTRACT

The development of effective interventions for COVID-19 vaccination has proven challenging given the unique and evolving determinants of that behavior. A tailored intervention to drive vaccination uptake through machine learning-enabled personalization of behavior change messages unexpectedly yielded a high volume of real-time short message service (SMS) feedback from recipients. A qualitative analysis of those replies contributes to a better understanding of the barriers to COVID-19 vaccination and demographic variations in determinants, supporting design improvements for vaccination interventions. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine unsolicited replies to a text message intervention for COVID-19 vaccination to understand the types of barriers experienced and any relationships between recipient demographics, intervention content, and reply type. METHOD: We categorized SMS replies into 22 overall themes. Interrater agreement was very good (all κpooled > 0.62). Chi-square analyses were used to understand demographic variations in reply types and which messaging types were most related to reply types. RESULTS: In total, 10,948 people receiving intervention text messages sent 17,090 replies. Most frequent reply types were "already vaccinated" (31.1%), attempts to unsubscribe (25.4%), and "will not get vaccinated" (12.7%). Within "already vaccinated" and "will not get vaccinated" replies, significant differences were observed in the demographics of those replying against expected base rates, all p > .001. Of those stating they would not vaccinate, 34% of the replies involved mis-/disinformation, suggesting that a determinant of vaccination involves nonvalidated COVID-19 beliefs. CONCLUSIONS: Insights from unsolicited replies can enhance our ability to identify appropriate intervention techniques to influence COVID-19 vaccination behaviors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Qualitative Research , Text Messaging , Vaccination , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Machine Learning , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Demography , Anti-Vaccination Movement/psychology , Behavioral Sciences , COVID-19/prevention & control
5.
Front Immunol ; 13: 994311, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2325164

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV2 vaccination efficiently prevents severe COVID-19, although hematological patients, particularly under therapy, respond less well. Besides vaccine efficacy, adherence to vaccination is essential for ensuring adequate protection of this vulnerable population. Methods: We evaluated the impact of a program aimed at maximizing patient adherence by comparing the rate of SARS-CoV2 vaccination of our hematological patients and a matched sample of the general population. Results: Vaccination rates were 88.9% among 2,156 patients, aged 65.2 ± 15.8 years (M ± SD, range 19-86 years). Rates differed considerably with age, i.e. 84.2% between 18-64 years and 92.4% above 65 years (p<0.0001), but not with sex. In the general population, rates were 76.3% overall, 73.0% between 18-64 and 86.7% above 65 years, all significantly lower than among patients, overall (Standardized Incidence ratio (SIR) 1.17; 95%CI 1.12-1.22, p<0.0001) as well as among younger (SIR 1.15; 1.07-1.24, p<0.0001) or older (SIR 1.06; 1.00-1.13, p=0.046) people. Vaccination rates increased to 92.2% overall (SIR 1.21; 1.16-1.27, p<0.0001), 88.5% in younger (SIR 1.21; 1.13-1.30, p<0.0001) and 94.8% in older (SIR 1.09; 1.03-1.12, p=0.0043) patients, after excluding those with medical contraindications, and further to 95.6% overall (SIR 1.26; 1.20-1.32, p<0.0001), 93.8% in younger (SIR 1.29; 1.20-1.38, p<0.0001) and 96.9% in older (SIR 1.11; 1.05-1.18, p=0.0004) patients, after excluding those not seen in hematology in 2021. Conclusions: Vaccination rates were significantly higher in hematological patients compared to the general population regardless of age, sex and municipality. Acceptance of Covid vaccines by hematological patients may be improved by targeted information campaigns carried out by trusted health care professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Hematologic Diseases , Treatment Adherence and Compliance , Vaccination , Aged , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Treatment Adherence and Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Male , Female , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Hematologic Diseases/therapy
7.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2196914, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305910

ABSTRACT

Evidence is limited on the actual uptake of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine among older adults, especially those with chronic diseases, during the pandemic. To examine COVID-19 vaccine uptake, reasons, and associated factor among older adults, a cross-sectional survey was conducted between September 24 and October 20, 2021 among older adults aged 60 and above in Shenzhen, China. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations of COVID-19 vaccine uptake with sociodemographic characteristics, pneumonia vaccination history, and participation in health education activities among older adults and among those with chronic diseases. Of the 951 participants, 82.8% reported being vaccinated against COVID-19 during the study period, but this proportion was relatively lower among adults aged 80 and above (62.7%) and those with chronic diseases (77.9%). The top-rated reasons for not being vaccinated included doctors not recommending it due to underlying diseases (34.1%), not being ready for it (18.3%), and failure to make an appointment (9.1%). General older adults who were aged below 70, had a high school and above education, were permanent residents of Shenzhen, were with good health and had pneumonia vaccination history were more likely to take the COVID-19 vaccination. Yet, among older adults with chronic diseases, other than age and permanent residency status, health status was the only significant indicator of COVID-19 vaccine uptake. Our study added to evidence that health condition is the critical barrier to the actual uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine among Chinese older adults, especially those aged 80 and above and those with chronic diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccination , Aged , Humans , Asian People , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Aged, 80 and over
8.
Epidemiol Health ; 43: e2021054, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2274737

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is considered to be the most effective measure for preventing the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Many countries, including of Korea, are focusing on achieving herd immunity with the goal of reaching a vaccination rate of 70-80%. However, achieving herd immunity does not mean eradicating COVID-19, and the following challenges can occur in the process of achieving herd immunity. First, as the vaccination rate is likely to slow down over time, it is necessary to promote the benefits of vaccination through risk communication strategies and provide incentives for those who have been vaccinated. Second, a booster dose may be required depending on future studies on vaccine-induced immunity. Third, since variants capable of evading immunity and with higher transmissibility can emerge, rapid contract tracing and regular community genomic surveillance could help mitigate the impact of new variants. When the impact of COVID-19 is controlled to the level of seasonal influenza, the current public health measures that have been strictly imposed on society since the beginning of the pandemic will no longer be needed. The overall response strategy to COVID-19 will need to change accordingly, based on evaluations of the level of population immunity. These changes will include more efficient and targeted contact tracing and eased quarantine measures for vaccinated close contacts and travelers. Mask wearing and a minimum of social distancing will still be required in the journey towards the end of the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic will end, but the virus will not disappear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Herd , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing , Humans , Quarantine , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
10.
Bioengineered ; 13(2): 3797-3809, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2257273

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) has spread globally with catastrophic damages to the public health, social and economy since the beginning of the outbreak. In 2020, Southeast Asia proved that it could prevent the worst effects of a pandemic through the closure of activities and borders and movement restriction, as well as social distancing. Nevertheless, with the occurrence of the common variants of concern (VOCs), especially Alpha (B.1.1.7), Beta (B.1.351), Delta (B.1.617.2), Southeast Asia is facing a significant increase in the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections. Now, the area also has the threats of the spreading out of the dangerous variant - Omicron (B.1.1.529) from other close countries or regions. COVID-19 countermeasures such as closures and social distancing seem to be insufficient. Moreover, Southeast Asia is being held back by a shortage of vaccines and other medical resources. This work focuses on describing the COVID-19 situation, the virus variants, and the coverage of COVID-19 vaccination in the area. We also provide perspectives on the COVID-19 vaccine distribution, protecting the economic capitals, developing the green zone, and the importance of finding more vaccine supplies in Southeast Asia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Asia, Southeastern , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
11.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 42(3): 357-365, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278944

ABSTRACT

In July 2021 New York City (NYC) instituted a requirement for all municipal employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or undergo weekly testing. The city eliminated the testing option November 1 of that year. We used general linear regression to compare changes in weekly primary vaccination series completion among NYC municipal employees ages 18-64 living in the city and a comparison group of all other NYC residents in this age group during May-December 2021. The rate of change in vaccination prevalence among NYC municipal employees was greater than that of the comparison group only after the testing option was eliminated (employee slope = 12.0; comparison slope = 5.3). Among racial and ethnic groups, the rate of change in vaccination prevalence among municipal employees was higher than the comparison group for Black and White people. The requirements were associated with narrowing the gap in vaccination prevalence between municipal employees and the comparison group overall and between Black municipal employees and employees from other racial and ethnic groups. Workplace requirements are a promising strategy for increasing vaccination among adults and reducing racial and ethnic disparities in vaccination uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Mandatory Programs , Vaccination , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Young Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , New York City , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Black or African American
12.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 116: 109823, 2023 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283350

ABSTRACT

This paper examines effectiveness of vaccination with symptoms by age groups in the US and Hamamatsu city in Japan. The efficacy of vaccination has been reported in Singapore, but both datasets such as the US CDC dataset and the Hamamatsu dataset contradict the Singapore results. Both local government and government datasets are publicly available for peer review and reader validation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccine Efficacy , Cost-Benefit Analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Japan/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccine Efficacy/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors
13.
Clin Chest Med ; 44(2): 425-434, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2257139

ABSTRACT

In the United States, the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disproportionally affected Black, Latinx, and Indigenous populations, immigrants, and economically disadvantaged individuals. Such historically marginalized groups are more often employed in low-wage jobs without health insurance and have higher rates of infection, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19 than non-Latinx White individuals. Mistrust in the health care system, language barriers, and limited health literacy have hindered vaccination rates in minorities, further exacerbating health disparities rooted in structural, institutional, and socioeconomic inequities. In this article, we discuss the lessons learned over the last 2 years and how to mitigate health disparities moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Inequities , Health Services Accessibility , Social Determinants of Health , Social Discrimination , Vulnerable Populations , Humans , Black or African American , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Ethnicity/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/economics , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Hispanic or Latino/psychology , Hispanic or Latino/statistics & numerical data , Indigenous Peoples/psychology , Indigenous Peoples/statistics & numerical data , Poverty/ethnology , Poverty/psychology , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , Social Determinants of Health/economics , Social Determinants of Health/ethnology , Social Determinants of Health/statistics & numerical data , Social Discrimination/economics , Social Discrimination/ethnology , Social Discrimination/psychology , Social Discrimination/statistics & numerical data , Social Marginalization/psychology , Trust/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/economics , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , White/psychology , White/statistics & numerical data
14.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1009309, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2247783

ABSTRACT

Background: The 2021 World Health Organization study on the impact of COVID-19 on older people (≥60 years) in the African region highlighted the difficulties they faced as the virus spread across borders and dominated the way of life. These difficulties included disruptions to both essential health care services and social support, as well as disconnections from family and friends. Among those who contracted COVID-19, the risks of severe illness, complications, and mortality were highest among near-old and older persons. Objective: Recognizing that older persons are a diverse group including younger- and older-aged individuals, a study was conducted to track the epidemic among near-old (50-59 years) and older persons (≥60 years) in South Africa covering the 2 years since the epidemic emerged. Methods: Using a quantitative secondary research approach, data for near-old and older persons were extracted for comparative purposes. COVID-19 surveillance outcomes (confirmed cases, hospitalizations, and deaths) and vaccination data were compiled up to March 5th, 2022. COVID-19 surveillance outcomes were plotted by epidemiological week and epidemic waves to visualize the overall growth and trajectory of the epidemic. Means for each age-group and by COVID-19 waves, together with age-specific rates, were calculated. Results: Average numbers of new COVID-19 confirmed cases and hospitalizations were highest among people aged 50-59- and 60-69-years. However, average age-specific infection rates showed that people aged 50-59 years and ≥80 years were most vulnerable to contracting COVID-19. Age-specific hospitalization and death rates increased, with people aged ≥ 70 years most affected. The number of people vaccinated was slightly higher among people aged 50-59 years before Wave Three and during Wave Four, but higher among people aged ≥ 60 years during Wave Three. The findings suggest that uptake of vaccinations stagnated prior to and during Wave Four for both age groups. Discussion: Health promotion messages and COVID-19 epidemiological surveillance and monitoring are still needed, particularly for older persons living in congregate residential and care facilities. Prompt health-seeking should be encouraged, including testing and diagnosis as well as taking up vaccines and boosters, particularly for high-risk older persons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemiological Monitoring , South Africa/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Aged , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Vaccines
15.
Am J Prev Med ; 64(5): 734-741, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2233982

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Focusing on subpopulations that express the intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccination but are unvaccinated may improve the yield of COVID-19 vaccination efforts. METHODS: A nationally representative sample of 789,658 U.S. adults aged ≥18 years participated in the National Immunization Survey Adult COVID Module from May 2021 to April 2022. The survey assessed respondents' COVID-19 vaccination status and intent by demographic characteristics (age, urbanicity, educational attainment, region, insurance, income, and race/ethnicity). This study compared composition and within-group estimates of those who responded that they definitely or probably will get vaccinated or are unsure (moveable middle) from the first and last month of data collection. RESULTS: Because vaccination uptake increased over the study period, the moveable middle declined among persons aged ≥18 years. Adults aged 18-39 years and suburban residents comprised most of the moveable middle in April 2022. Groups with the largest moveable middles in April 2022 included persons with no insurance (10%), those aged 18-29 years (8%), and those with incomes below poverty (8%), followed by non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (7%), non-Hispanic multiple or other race (6%), non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons (6%), non-Hispanic Black or African American persons (6%), those with below high school education (6%), those with high school education (5%), and those aged 30-39 years (5%). CONCLUSIONS: A sizable percentage of adults open to receiving COVID-19 vaccination remain in several demographic groups. Emphasizing engagement of persons who are unvaccinated in some racial/ethnic groups, aged 18-39 years, without health insurance, or with lower income may reach more persons open to vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data
16.
JAMA ; 329(1): 9-11, 2023 01 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2172179

ABSTRACT

This Medical News article discusses an annual report on measles from the World Health Organization and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Measles Vaccine , Measles , Vaccination , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Measles/epidemiology , Measles/prevention & control , Measles Vaccine/therapeutic use , Ohio/epidemiology , Pandemics , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
17.
Nature ; 613(7945): 704-711, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2185935

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, sizeable groups of unvaccinated people persist even in countries with high vaccine access1. As a consequence, vaccination became a controversial subject of debate and even protest2. Here we assess whether people express discriminatory attitudes in the form of negative affectivity, stereotypes and exclusionary attitudes in family and political settings across groups defined by COVID-19 vaccination status. We quantify discriminatory attitudes between vaccinated and unvaccinated citizens in 21 countries, covering a diverse set of cultures across the world. Across three conjoined experimental studies (n = 15,233), we demonstrate that vaccinated people express discriminatory attitudes towards unvaccinated individuals at a level as high as discriminatory attitudes that are commonly aimed at immigrant and minority populations3-5. By contrast, there is an absence of evidence that unvaccinated individuals display discriminatory attitudes towards vaccinated people, except for the presence of negative affectivity in Germany and the USA. We find evidence in support of discriminatory attitudes against unvaccinated individuals in all countries except for Hungary and Romania, and find that discriminatory attitudes are more strongly expressed in cultures with stronger cooperative norms. Previous research on the psychology of cooperation has shown that individuals react negatively against perceived 'free-riders'6,7, including in the domain of vaccinations8,9. Consistent with this, we find that contributors to the public good of epidemic control (that is, vaccinated individuals) react with discriminatory attitudes towards perceived free-riders (that is, unvaccinated individuals). National leaders and vaccinated members of the public appealed to moral obligations to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake10,11, but our findings suggest that discriminatory attitudes-including support for the removal of fundamental rights-simultaneously emerged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Internationality , Prejudice , Vaccination Refusal , Vaccination , Humans , Civil Rights/psychology , Cooperative Behavior , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Germany , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Hungary , Moral Obligations , Pandemics/prevention & control , Politics , Prejudice/psychology , Prejudice/statistics & numerical data , Romania , Stereotyping , United States , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data
18.
J Behav Med ; 46(1-2): 129-139, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2174606

ABSTRACT

Latino, Black, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN), and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander people have the highest hospitalizations and death rates from COVID-19. Social inequalities have exacerbated COVID-19 related health disparities. This study examines social and structural determinants of COVID-19 vaccine uptake. Results from logistic regressions suggest Latino and Black people were less likely to be vaccinated. People that did not have health insurance, a primary care doctor and were unemployed were more than 30% less likely to be vaccinated for COVID-19. Greater perceived health inequalities in one's neighborhood and perceived racial/ethnic discrimination were associated with a decreased odds in being vaccinated. People that suffered the loss of a household member from COVID-19 were three times more likely to have been vaccinated. Establishing policies that will increase access to health insurance and create jobs with living wages may have lasting impacts. Furthermore, collaboration with local and national community organizations can enhance the development of sustainable solutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Health Inequities , Health Status Disparities , Social Determinants of Health , Vaccination Coverage , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Hispanic or Latino/statistics & numerical data , Racial Groups/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology , Social Determinants of Health/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Black or African American/statistics & numerical data
19.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2158012, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2166145

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine the willingness of college students to choose COVID-19 heterologous vaccination and its associated influencing factors in Taizhou, China. A population-based, self-administered online questionnaire was conducted from March 15 to 17, 2022. Of the 2,463 participants who had received the invitation, 1,821 responded to the survey (response rate = 73.9%). Only 14% (86/614) of those willing to receive a booster would chose a heterologous vaccination; the perception of better effectiveness of a COVID-19 heterologous vaccination booster was the significant factor (X2 = 22.671, p < .001). Additionally, female college students'older age (χ2 = 7.523, P = .023), major of medical (χ2 = 6.294, P = .012), and better perceived effectiveness of COVID-19 heterologous vaccination booster (χ2 = 22.659, P < .001), were more willing to receive heterologous booster doses. Chinese college students have a strong willingness to receive booster shots, but the percentage of those willing to receive a heterologous vaccine is only 14.0%, and the lack of understanding of its effectiveness is an important factor in the low proportion of heterologous vaccine selection. Health education, public health awareness, and the disclosure of heterologous vaccine information can help improve the public's understanding of heterologous vaccines and provide them with more choices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccination , Female , Humans , Asian People , China , COVID-19/prevention & control , Students , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage
20.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501319221136361, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139057

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine Influenza and COVID-19 vaccine concerns and uptake among adult patients in a Southern safety-net health system. METHODS: Trained research assistants conducted a structured telephone interview from April to October 2021. Of 118 participants, mean age was 57.7 years, 63.6% were female, 55.1% were Black, 42.4% white, and 54.2% reported rural residence. RESULTS: Among participants, 44.9% had received the influenza vaccine during the 2020 to 2021 season, and 66.1% had received the COVID-19 vaccine. Participants who received the influenza vaccine were more likely to report getting a COVID-19 vaccine compared to those who reported not getting a flu vaccine (81.1% vs 53.8%, P = .002). Black adults were significantly less likely than white adults (29.2% vs 46.0%, P = .048) and bordering on significance, males less likely than females (27.9% vs 41.3%, P = .054) to have reported receiving both vaccines. Of note, 25.4% of participants did not get either vaccine. The most common reasons for not getting the influenza vaccine were not being concerned about getting the flu (13.8%) and belief the vaccine gave them the flu (12.3%). The primary reasons for not getting a COVID-19 vaccine were concern about vaccine safety (22.5%), concern about side effects (20.0%), and belief they were not going to get sick (20.0%). CONCLUSIONS: These findings could help direct regional vaccine messaging and clinical communication to improve vaccine uptake among underserved populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Influenza Vaccines , Safety-net Providers , Vaccination , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Influenza Vaccines/adverse effects , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
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