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1.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2410: 229-263, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575944

ABSTRACT

Vaccines are one of mankind's greatest medical advances, and their use has drastically reduced and in some cases eliminated (e.g., smallpox) disease and death caused by infectious agents. Traditional vaccine modalities including live-attenuated pathogen vaccines, wholly inactivated pathogen vaccines, and protein-based pathogen subunit vaccines have successfully been used to create efficacious vaccines against measles, mumps, rubella, polio, and yellow fever. These traditional vaccine modalities, however, take many months to years to develop and have thus proven less effective for use in creating vaccines to emerging or reemerging infectious diseases (EIDs) including influenza, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), West Nile virus (WNV), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses 1 and 2 (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2). As factors such as climate change and increased globalization continue to increase the pace of EID development, newer vaccine modalities are required to develop vaccines that can prevent or attenuate EID outbreaks throughout the world. One such modality, DNA vaccines, has been studied for over 30 years and has numerous qualities that make them ideal for meeting the challenge of EIDs including; (1) DNA vaccine candidates can be designed within hours of publishing of a pathogens genetic sequence; (2) they can be manufactured cheaply and rapidly in large quantities; (3) they are thermostable and have reduced requirement for a cold-chain during distribution, and (4) they have a remarkable safety record in the clinic. Optimizations made in plasmid design as well as in DNA vaccine delivery have greatly improved the immunogenicity of these vaccines. Here we describe the process of making a DNA vaccine to an EID pathogen and describe methods used for assessing the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines in small animal models.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Vaccines, DNA , Viral Vaccines , Animals , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control , Humans , Immunity , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Viral Vaccines/genetics , Viral Vaccines/immunology
2.
Curr Opin Immunol ; 71: 111-116, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531148

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pandemic of unprecedented proportions in recent human history. Less than 18 months since the onset of the pandemic, there are close to two hundred million confirmed cases and four million deaths worldwide. There have also been massive efforts geared towards finding safe and effective vaccines. By July 2021 there were 184 COVID-19 vaccine candidates in pre-clinical development, 105 in clinical development, and 18 vaccines approved for emergency use by at least one regulatory authority. These vaccines include whole virus live attenuated or inactivated, protein-based, viral vector, and nucleic acid vaccines. By mid-2021 three billion doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered around the world, mostly in high-income countries. COVID-19 vaccination provides hope for an end to the pandemic, if and only if there would be equal access and optimal uptake in all countries around the world.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
3.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(45)2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475573

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and other pathogens with pandemic potential requires safe, protective, inexpensive, and easily accessible vaccines that can be developed and manufactured rapidly at a large scale. DNA vaccines can achieve these criteria, but induction of strong immune responses has often required bulky, expensive electroporation devices. Here, we report an ultra-low-cost (<1 USD), handheld (<50 g) electroporation system utilizing a microneedle electrode array ("ePatch") for DNA vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. The low cost and small size are achieved by combining a thumb-operated piezoelectric pulser derived from a common household stove lighter that emits microsecond, bipolar, oscillatory electric pulses and a microneedle electrode array that targets delivery of high electric field strength pulses to the skin's epidermis. Antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 induced by this electroporation system in mice were strong and enabled at least 10-fold dose sparing compared to conventional intramuscular or intradermal injection of the DNA vaccine. Vaccination was well tolerated with mild, transient effects on the skin. This ePatch system is easily portable, without any battery or other power source supply, offering an attractive, inexpensive approach for rapid and accessible DNA vaccination to combat COVID-19, as well as other epidemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Electroporation/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Costs and Cost Analysis , Electroporation/economics , Electroporation/methods , Equipment Design , Female , Genes, Reporter , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Microelectrodes , Needles , Pandemics/prevention & control , Proof of Concept Study , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Skin/immunology , Skin/metabolism , Transfection , Vaccination/economics , Vaccination/instrumentation , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, DNA/genetics , Vaccines, DNA/immunology
4.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(9): e1009701, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435628

ABSTRACT

The speed of development, versatility and efficacy of mRNA-based vaccines have been amply demonstrated in the case of SARS-CoV-2. DNA vaccines represent an important alternative since they induce both humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models and in human trials. We tested the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA-based vaccine regimens expressing different prefusion-stabilized Wuhan-Hu-1 SARS-CoV-2 Spike antigens upon intramuscular injection followed by electroporation in rhesus macaques. Different Spike DNA vaccine regimens induced antibodies that potently neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in vitro and elicited robust T cell responses. The antibodies recognized and potently neutralized a panel of different Spike variants including Alpha, Delta, Epsilon, Eta and A.23.1, but to a lesser extent Beta and Gamma. The DNA-only vaccine regimens were compared to a regimen that included co-immunization of Spike DNA and protein in the same anatomical site, the latter of which showed significant higher antibody responses. All vaccine regimens led to control of SARS-CoV-2 intranasal/intratracheal challenge and absence of virus dissemination to the lower respiratory tract. Vaccine-induced binding and neutralizing antibody titers and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis inversely correlated with transient virus levels in the nasal mucosa. Importantly, the Spike DNA+Protein co-immunization regimen induced the highest binding and neutralizing antibodies and showed the strongest control against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in rhesus macaques.


Subject(s)
Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, DNA , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , DNA, Viral/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Immunization, Passive , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Mice , RNA, Messenger/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Vaccines, DNA/immunology
6.
Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol ; 21(6): 569-575, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356717

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Molecular forms of allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) are continuously emerging to improve the efficacy of the treatment, to shorten the duration of protocols and to prevent any side effects. The present review covers the recent progress in the development of AIT based on nucleic acid encoding allergens or CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN). RECENT FINDINGS: Therapeutic vaccinations with plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) encoding major shrimp Met e 1 or insect For t 2 allergen were effective for the treatment of food or insect bite allergy in respective animal models. DNA expressing hypoallergenic shrimp tropomyosin activated Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells whereas DNA encoding For t 2 down-regulated the expression of pruritus-inducing IL-31. Co-administrations of major cat allergen Fel d 1 with high doses of CpG-ODN reduced Th2 airway inflammation through tolerance induction mediated by GATA3+ Foxp3hi Treg cells as well as early anti-inflammatory TNF/TNFR2 signaling cascade. Non-canonical CpG-ODN derived from Cryptococcus neoformans as well as methylated CpG sites present in the genomic DNA from Bifidobacterium infantis mediated Th1 or Treg cell differentiation respectively. SUMMARY: Recent studies on plasmid DNA encoding allergens evidenced their therapeutic potential for the treatment of food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Unmethylated or methylated CpG-ODNs were shown to activate dose-dependent Treg/Th1 responses. Large clinical trials need to be conducted to confirm these promising preclinical data. Moreover, tremendous success of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 must encourage as well the re-exploration of mRNA vaccine platform for innovative AIT.


Subject(s)
Desensitization, Immunologic/methods , Hypersensitivity, Immediate/therapy , Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/administration & dosage , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Allergens/administration & dosage , Allergens/genetics , Allergens/immunology , Animals , Clinical Trials as Topic , Desensitization, Immunologic/trends , Disease Models, Animal , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Humans , Hypersensitivity, Immediate/immunology , Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/genetics , Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/immunology , Plasmids/administration & dosage , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/immunology , Treatment Outcome , Vaccines, DNA/genetics , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
7.
Int J Biol Macromol ; 188: 740-750, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356252

ABSTRACT

The world has been suffering from COVID-19 disease for more than a year, and it still has a high mortality rate. In addition to the need to minimize transmission of the virus through non-pharmacological measures such as the use of masks and social distance, many efforts are being made to develop a variety of vaccines to prevent the disease worldwide. So far, several vaccines have reached the final stages of safety and efficacy in various phases of clinical trials, and some, such as Moderna/NIAID and BioNTech/Pfizer, have reported very high safety and protection. The important point is that comparing different vaccines is not easy because there is no set standard for measuring neutralization. In this study, we have reviewed the common platforms of COVID-19 vaccines and tried to present the latest reports on the effectiveness of these vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemistry , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Protein Subunits/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
8.
Front Immunol ; 12: 658519, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317222

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly pathogenic novel virus that has caused a massive pandemic called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) worldwide. Wuhan, a city in China became the epicenter of the outbreak of COVID-19 in December 2019. The disease was declared a pandemic globally by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 11 March 2020. SARS-CoV-2 is a beta CoV of the Coronaviridae family which usually causes respiratory symptoms that resemble common cold. Multiple countries have experienced multiple waves of the disease and scientific experts are consistently working to find answers to several unresolved questions, with the aim to find the most suitable ways to contain the virus. Furthermore, potential therapeutic strategies and vaccine development for COVID-19 management are also considered. Currently, substantial efforts have been made to develop successful and safe treatments and SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Some vaccines, such as inactivated vaccines, nucleic acid-based, and vector-based vaccines, have entered phase 3 clinical trials. Additionally, diverse small molecule drugs, peptides and antibodies are being developed to treat COVID-19. We present here an overview of the virus interaction with the host and environment and anti-CoV therapeutic strategies; including vaccines and other methodologies, designed for prophylaxis and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with the hope that this integrative analysis could help develop novel therapeutic approaches against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity , Mutation Rate , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Small Molecule Libraries/therapeutic use , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/therapeutic use , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/therapeutic use
9.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1390-1403, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268055

ABSTRACT

Global concerns arose as the emerged and rapidly spreading SARS-CoV-2 variants might escape host immunity induced by vaccination. In this study, a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy for COVID-19 was designed to prime with a DNA vaccine encoding wild type (WT) spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) followed by S1 protein-based vaccine in rabbits. Four vaccine-elicited rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RmAbs), including 1H1, 9H1, 7G5, and 5E1, were isolated for biophysical property, neutralization potency and sequence analysis. All RmAbs recognized RBD or S1 protein with KD in the low nM or sub nM range. 1H1 and 9H1, but neither 7G5 nor 5E1, can bind to all RBD protein variants derived from B.1.351. All four RmAbs were able to neutralize wild type (WT) SARS-CoV-2 strain in pseudovirus assay, and 1H1 and 9H1 could neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 WT authentic virus with IC50 values of 0.136 and 0.026 µg/mL, respectively. Notably, 1H1 was able to neutralize all 6 emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants tested including D614G, B.1.1.7, B.1.429, P.1, B.1.526, and B.1.351 variants, and 5E1 could neutralize against the above 5 variants except P.1. Epitope binning analysis revealed that 9H1, 5E1 and 1H1 recognized distinct epitopes, while 9H1 and 7G5 may have overlapping but not identical epitope. In conclusion, DNA priming protein boost vaccination was an effective strategy to induce RmAbs with potent neutralization capability against not only SARS-CoV-2 WT strain but also emergent variants, which may provide a new avenue for effective therapeutics and point-of-care diagnostic measures.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Genetic Variation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Epitopes , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , Protein Domains/immunology , Protein Domains/physiology , Rabbits , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic , Virus Attachment
10.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 15(5): e0009374, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264204

ABSTRACT

The development of efficient vaccines against COVID-19 is an emergent need for global public health. The spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a major target for the COVID-19 vaccine. To quickly respond to the outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, a nucleic acid-based vaccine is a novel option, beyond the traditional inactivated virus vaccine or recombinant protein vaccine. Here, we report a DNA vaccine containing the spike gene for delivery via electroporation. The spike genes of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 were codon optimized for mammalian cell expression and then cloned into mammalian cell expression vectors, called pSARS-S and pSARS2-S, respectively. Spike protein expression was confirmed by immunoblotting after transient expression in HEK293T cells. After immunization, sera were collected for antigen-specific antibody and neutralizing antibody titer analyses. We found that both pSARS-S and pSARS2-S immunization induced similar levels of antibodies against S2 of SARS-CoV-2. In contrast, only pSARS2-S immunization induced antibodies against the receptor-binding domain of SARS-CoV-2. We further found that pSARS2-S immunization, but not pSARS-S immunization, could induce very high titers of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. We further analyzed SARS-CoV-2 S protein-specific T cell responses and found that the immune responses were biased toward Th1. Importantly, pSARS2-S immunization in hamsters could induce protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 challenge in vivo. These data suggest that DNA vaccination could be a promising approach for protecting against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/standards , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Electroporation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mesocricetus , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Plasmids , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vero Cells
11.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 96: 107763, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258391

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of the rapidly spreading pandemic COVID-19 in the world. As an effective therapeutic strategy is not introduced yet and the rapid genetic variations in the virus, there is an emerging necessity to design, evaluate and apply effective new vaccines. An acceptable vaccine must elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses, must have the least side effects and the storage and transport systems should be available and affordable for all countries. These vaccines can be classified into different types: inactivated vaccines, live-attenuated virus vaccines, subunit vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs), nucleic acid-based vaccines (DNA and RNA) and recombinant vector-based vaccines (replicating and non-replicating viral vector). According to the latest update of the WHO report on April 2nd, 2021, at least 85 vaccine candidates were being studied in clinical trial phases and 184 candidate vaccines were being evaluated in pre-clinical stages. In addition, studies have shown that other vaccines, including the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and the Plant-derived vaccine, may play a role in controlling pandemic COVID-19. Herein, we reviewed the different types of COVID-19 candidate vaccines that are currently being evaluated in preclinical and clinical trial phases along with advantages, disadvantages or adverse reactions, if any.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Animals , BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Female , Humans , Male , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Middle Aged , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology , Vaccines, Virus-Like Particle/immunology , Viral Vaccines/immunology
12.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248007, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145483

ABSTRACT

More than 65 million people have been confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 and more than 1 million have died from COVID-19 and this pandemic remains critical worldwide. Effective vaccines are one of the most important strategies to limit the pandemic. Here, we report a construction strategy of DNA vaccine candidates expressing full length wild type SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein, S1 or S2 region and their immunogenicity in mice. All DNA vaccine constructs of pCMVkan-S, -S1 and -S2 induced high levels of specific binding IgG that showed a balance of IgG1/IgG2a response. However, only the sera from mice vaccinated with pCMKkan-S or -S1 DNA vaccines could inhibit viral RBD and ACE2 interaction. The highest neutralizing antibody (NAb) titer was found in pCMVkan-S group, followed by -S1, while -S2 showed the lowest PRNT50 titers. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 2,551, 1,005 and 291 for pCMVkan-S, -S1 and -S2, respectively. pCMVkan-S construct vaccine also induced the highest magnitude and breadth of T cells response. Analysis of IFN-γ positive cells after stimulation with SARS-CoV-2 spike peptide pools were 2,991, 1,376 and 1,885 SFC/106 splenocytes for pCMVkan-S, -S1 and -S2, respectively. Our findings highlighted that full-length S antigen is more potent than the truncated spike (S1 or S2) in inducing of neutralizing antibody and robust T cell responses.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Th1 Cells/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Mice , Mice, Inbred ICR , Plasmids/genetics , Plasmids/metabolism , Protein Binding , Th1 Cells/cytology , Th1 Cells/metabolism , Vaccines, DNA/genetics
13.
Front Immunol ; 12: 637654, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138709

ABSTRACT

A coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which has caused the pandemic viral pneumonia disease COVID-19, significantly threatens global public health, highlighting the need to develop effective and safe vaccines against its infection. In this study, we developed a novel DNA vaccine candidate against SARS-CoV-2 by expressing a chimeric protein of its receptor-binding domain (RBD) fused to a 33-bp sequence (11 aa) from the hepatitis B virus (HBV) preS1 region with a W4P mutation (W4P-RBD) at the N-terminal region and evaluated its immunogenicity. In vitro transfection experiments in multiple cell lines demonstrated that W4P-RBD vs. wild-type RBD protein (W-RBD) led to enhanced production of IL-6 and TNFα at the transcription and translation levels, suggesting the adjuvant potential of N-terminal HBV preS1 sequences for DNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2. W4P-RBD also led to enhanced production of IgG and IgA, which can neutralize and block SARS-CoV-2 infection in both blood sera and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from the lung in vaccinated mice. Additionally, W4P-RBD led to an enhanced T-cell-mediated cellular immune response under S1 protein stimulation. In summary, W4P-RBD led to robust humoral and cell-mediated immune responses against SARS-CoV-2 in vaccinated mice, highlighting its feasibility as a novel DNA vaccine to protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hepatitis B Surface Antigens/genetics , Hepatitis B Surface Antigens/immunology , Mutation , Protein Domains/immunology , Protein Precursors/genetics , Protein Precursors/immunology , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Vaccination/methods , Vero Cells
14.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(12)2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125261

ABSTRACT

Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a replication-restricted smallpox vaccine, and numerous clinical studies of recombinant MVAs (rMVAs) as vectors for prevention of other infectious diseases, including COVID-19, are in progress. Here, we characterize rMVAs expressing the S protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Modifications of full-length S individually or in combination included two proline substitutions, mutations of the furin recognition site, and deletion of the endoplasmic retrieval signal. Another rMVA in which the receptor binding domain (RBD) is flanked by the signal peptide and transmembrane domains of S was also constructed. Each modified S protein was displayed on the surface of rMVA-infected cells and was recognized by anti-RBD antibody and soluble hACE2 receptor. Intramuscular injection of mice with the rMVAs induced antibodies, which neutralized a pseudovirus in vitro and, upon passive transfer, protected hACE2 transgenic mice from lethal infection with SARS-CoV-2, as well as S-specific CD3+CD8+IFNγ+ T cells. Antibody boosting occurred following a second rMVA or adjuvanted purified RBD protein. Immunity conferred by a single vaccination of hACE2 mice prevented morbidity and weight loss upon intranasal infection with SARS-CoV-2 3 wk or 7 wk later. One or two rMVA vaccinations also prevented detection of infectious SARS-CoV-2 and subgenomic viral mRNAs in the lungs and greatly reduced induction of cytokine and chemokine mRNAs. A low amount of virus was found in the nasal turbinates of only one of eight rMVA-vaccinated mice on day 2 and none later. Detection of low levels of subgenomic mRNAs in turbinates indicated that replication was aborted in immunized animals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Genetic Vectors/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccinia virus/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Specificity/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunization , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , Vaccines, DNA/administration & dosage , Vaccines, DNA/genetics
15.
Immunity ; 54(3): 542-556.e9, 2021 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101300

ABSTRACT

A combination of vaccination approaches will likely be necessary to fully control the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. Here, we show that modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vectors expressing membrane-anchored pre-fusion stabilized spike (MVA/S) but not secreted S1 induced strong neutralizing antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2 in mice. In macaques, the MVA/S vaccination induced strong neutralizing antibodies and CD8+ T cell responses, and conferred protection from SARS-CoV-2 infection and virus replication in the lungs as early as day 2 following intranasal and intratracheal challenge. Single-cell RNA sequencing analysis of lung cells on day 4 after infection revealed that MVA/S vaccination also protected macaques from infection-induced inflammation and B cell abnormalities and lowered induction of interferon-stimulated genes. These results demonstrate that MVA/S vaccination induces neutralizing antibodies and CD8+ T cells in the blood and lungs and is a potential vaccine candidate for SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Genetic Vectors/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccinia virus/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/genetics , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Gene Expression , Gene Order , Immunophenotyping , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Macaca , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/metabolism , Macrophages, Alveolar/pathology , Mice , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism , Vaccination/methods , Vaccines, DNA/genetics
16.
Viruses ; 13(2)2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079722

ABSTRACT

The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has highlighted both the importance of One Health, i.e., the interactions and transmission of pathogens between animals and humans, and the potential power of gene-based vaccines, specifically nucleic acid vaccines. This review will highlight key aspects of the development of plasmid DNA Nucleic Acid (NA) vaccines, which have been licensed for several veterinary uses, and tested for a number of human diseases, and will explain how an understanding of their immunological and real-world attributes are important for their efficacy, and how they helped pave the way for mRNA vaccines. The review highlights how combining efforts for vaccine development for both animals and humans is crucial for advancing new technologies and for combatting emerging diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , One Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , Humans , Immunity , Vaccines, DNA/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
17.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 342-355, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069193

ABSTRACT

The current study aims to develop a safe and highly immunogenic COVID-19 vaccine. The novel combination of a DNA vaccine encoding the full-length Spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2 and a recombinant S1 protein vaccine induced high level neutralizing antibody and T cell immune responses in both small and large animal models. More significantly, the co-delivery of DNA and protein components at the same time elicited full protection against intratracheal challenge of SARS-CoV-2 viruses in immunized rhesus macaques. As both DNA and protein vaccines have been proven safe in previous human studies, and DNA vaccines are capable of eliciting germinal center B cell development, which is critical for high-affinity memory B cell responses, the DNA and protein co-delivery vaccine approach has great potential to serve as a safe and effective approach to develop COVID-19 vaccines that provide long-term protection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Cell Line , DNA/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Plasmids/genetics , Rabbits , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology
19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3125, 2021 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065956

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and its rapid spread into a global pandemic made the urgent development of scalable vaccines to prevent coronavirus disease (COVID-19) a global health and economic imperative. Here, we characterized and compared the immunogenicity of two alphavirus-based DNA-launched self-replicating (DREP) vaccine candidates encoding either SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (DREP-S) or a spike ectodomain trimer stabilized in prefusion conformation (DREP-Secto). We observed that the two DREP constructs were immunogenic in mice inducing both binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as T cell responses. Interestingly, the DREP coding for the unmodified spike turned out to be more potent vaccine candidate, eliciting high titers of SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG antibodies that were able to efficiently neutralize pseudotyped virus after a single immunization. In addition, both DREP constructs were able to efficiently prime responses that could be boosted with a heterologous spike protein immunization. These data provide important novel insights into SARS-CoV-2 vaccine design using a rapid response DNA vaccine platform. Moreover, they encourage the use of mixed vaccine modalities as a strategy to combat SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Animals , Female , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL
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