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1.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 7(1): 69, 2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1721495

ABSTRACT

Emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants and the gradually decreasing neutralizing antibodies over time post vaccination have led to an increase in incidents of breakthrough infection across the world. To investigate the potential protective effect of the recombinant protein subunit COVID-19 vaccine targeting receptor-binding domain (RBD) (PS-RBD) and whole inactivated virus particle vaccine (IV) against the variant strains, in this study, rhesus macaques were immunized with PS-RBD or IV vaccine, followed by a Beta variant (B.1.351) challenge. Although neutralizing activity against the Beta variant was reduced compared with that against the prototype, the decreased viral load in both upper and lower respiratory tracts, milder pathological changes, and downregulated inflammatory cytokine levels in lung tissues after challenge demonstrated that PS-RBD and IV still provided effective protection against the Beta variant in the macaque model. Furthermore, PS-RBD-induced macaque sera possessed general binding and neutralizing activity to Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron variants in our study, though the neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers declined by varying degrees, demonstrating potential protection of PS-RBD against current circulating variants of concern (VOCs). Interestingly, although the IV vaccine-induced extremely low neutralizing antibody titers against the Beta variant, it still showed reduction for viral load and significantly alleviated pathological change. Other correlates of vaccine-induced protection (CoP) like antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and immune memory were both confirmed to be existing in IV vaccinated group and possibly be involved in the protective mechanism.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/pharmacology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/pharmacology
3.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263468, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mass vaccination is the key element in controlling current COVID-19 pandemic. Studies comparing immunogenicity of different COVID-19 vaccines are largely lacking. We aimed at measuring anti-S antibody (Ab) levels in individuals fully vaccinated with BNT162b2, BBIBP-CorV and Gam-COVID-Vac, as well as in COVID-19 convalescents. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, serum was collected from 400 age- and sex-matched participants, 100 fully vaccinated with BNT162b2, 100 with BBIBP-CorV and 100 with Gam-COVID-Vac on the 28th day after the second vaccine dose, and 100 recovered from COVID-19 at least 28 days after symptom(s) resolution. Sera were analyzed using the LIAISON SARS-CoV-2 S1/S2 IgG assay (DiaSorin, Saluggia, Italy). Wilcoxon rank-sum or Kruskal-Wallis tests was used for comparison of Ab levels. RESULTS: Highest mean value (210.11, SD = 100.42) was measured in the BNT162b2 group, followed by Gam-COVID-Vac (171.11, SD = 120.69) and BBIBP-CorV (68.50, SD = 72.78) AU/mL (p<0.001). Significant differences in antibody levels were found between BNT162b2 and BBIBP-CorV (p<0.001), BNT162b2 and Gam-COVID-Vac (p = 0.001), as well as BBIBP-CorV and Gam-COVID-Vac groups (p<0.001). Percentage of seropositive was 81% in the convalescent group, 83% in BBIBP-CorV vaccinated and 100% in BNT162b2 and Gam-COVID-Vac. When comparing measured antibody levels in vaccinated to those in COVID-19 recovered, significantly higher antibody levels were found for vaccinated with BNT162b2 (p<0.001), and with Gam-COVID-Vac (p<0.001), while for BBIBP-CorV there was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.641). CONCLUSIONS: All three investigated vaccines, BNT162b2, BBIBP-CorV and Gam-COVID-Vac, provide robust immune response 28 days after the second dose of vaccine, in the majority of participants. All individuals vaccinated with BNT162b2 and Gam-COVID-Vac seroconverted, while in vaccinated with BBIBP-CorV and COVID-19 recovered seroconversion rates were lower. Although less potent compared to other two vaccines, immune response after BBIBP-CorV was similar to response measured in convalescents. Challenge still remains to examine dynamics and durability of immunoprotection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Treatment Outcome , Adult , Antibodies/analysis , Antibodies/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Convalescence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Immunity/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/analysis , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Serbia , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
4.
Transplantation ; 106(4): 853-861, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703621

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 mRNA vaccines elicit lower humoral responses in solid-organ transplant recipients. This is the first prospective trial investigating the effect of an inactivated whole-virion vaccine in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: Prospective, single-center, phase 4, interventional study. Kidney transplant recipients aged 30-69 y with >30 d of transplantation received two 3 µg intramuscular doses of CoronaVac 28 d apart and are being followed for 6 mo. Primary outcomes: (1) reactogenicity after first dose; (2) antibody responses 28 d after each dose; and (3) incidence/severity of confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and 28-d lethality rate. For this analysis, clinical effectiveness was assessed for 3 mo, starting 15 d after the second dose, and compared with 3-mo period before vaccination. RESULTS: Of the 3371 individuals who received the first dose, 99% completed vaccination schedule. Mild/local adverse reactions were reported by 33% of the patients. In the immunogenicity cohort (n = 942), the proportion of patients with IgG antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 increased from 15.2% after first dose to 43% after second dose. Increase in antibody values after second dose was associated with higher proportion of patients with detected neutralizing antibodies. A significant reduction in the incidence of COVID-19 was observed (6.4% versus 4.2%; P < 0.0001), although the 28-d lethality rate remained unchanged (25% versus 22%; P = 0.534). In 45 patients from the immunogenicity cohort who developed COVID-19, all the 6 deaths occurred among those without antibody response (n = 22; 49%). CONCLUSIONS: CoronaVac vaccine was associated with low reactogenicity, low immunogenicity but reduced incidence of COVID-19 among kidney transplant recipients. The lack of reduction in lethality rates is perhaps associated with the low percentage of patients developing humoral response after the second dose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
5.
Front Immunol ; 13: 829665, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686487

ABSTRACT

Background: Understanding the long-term kinetic characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and the impact of inactivated vaccines on SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in convalescent patients can provide information for developing and improving vaccination strategies in such populations. Methods: In this cohort, 402 convalescent patients who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR from 1 January to 22 June 2020 in Jiangsu, China, were enrolled. The epidemiological data included demographics, symptom onset, and vaccination history. Blood samples were collected and tested for antibody levels of specific IgG, IgM, RBD-IgG, S-IgG, and neutralizing antibodies using a the commercial magnetic chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. Results: The median follow-up time after symptom onset was 15.6 months (IQR, 14.6 to 15.8). Of the 402 convalescent patients, 44 (13.84%) received an inactivated vaccine against COVID-19. A total of 255 (80.19%) patients were IgG-positive and 65 (20.44%) were IgM-positive. The neutralizing antibody was 83.02%. Compared with non-vaccinated individuals, the IgG antibody levels in vaccinated people were higher (P=0.007). Similarly, antibody levels for RBD-IgG, S-IgG, and neutralizing antibodies were all highly increased in vaccinated individuals (P<0.05). IgG levels were significantly higher after vaccination than before vaccination in the same population. IgG levels in those who received 'single dose and ≥14d' were similar to those with two doses (P>0.05). Similar conclusions were drawn for RBD-IgG and the neutralizing antibody. Conclusion: 15.6 months after symptom onset, the majority of participants remained positive for serum-specific IgG, RBD-IgG, S-IgG, and neutralizing antibodies. For convalescent patients, a single dose of inactivated vaccine against COVID-19 can further boost antibody titres.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Child , China , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Young Adult
7.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674827

ABSTRACT

A new SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.529 was named by the WHO as Omicron and classified as a Variant of Concern (VOC) on 26 November 2021. Because this variant has more than 50 mutations, including 30 mutations on the spike, it has generated a lot of concerns on the potential impacts of the VOC on COVID-19. Here through ELISA assays using the recombinant RBD proteins with sequences the same to that of SARS-CoV-2 WIV04 (lineage B.1), the Delta variant and the Omicron variant as the coating antigens, the binding capabilities between the RBDs and the antibodies in COVID-19 convalescent sera and vaccine sera after two doses of the inactivated vaccine produced by Sinopharm WIBP are compared with each other. The results showed that the Omicron variant may evade antibodies induced by the ancestral strain and by the inactivated vaccine, with significant reduction in the binding capability of its RBD much greater than that of the Delta variant.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Binding Sites, Antibody/physiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Convalescence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion , Mutation , Neutralization Tests , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
8.
Viruses ; 14(2)2022 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1667345

ABSTRACT

This study compared the immunogenicity of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines between people living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV-negative individuals. We recruited 120 PLWH and 53 HIV-negative individuals aged 18-59 years who had received an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in two Chinese cities between April and June 2021. Blood samples were tested for immunogenicity of the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. The prevalence and severity of adverse events associated with SARS-CoV-2 vaccines were similar between PLWH and HIV-negative individuals. The seropositivity of neutralizing activity against authentic SARS-CoV-2, of the total amount of antibody (total antibody) and of S-IgG were 71.3%, 81.9%, and 92.6%, respectively, among fully vaccinated PLWH. Among all participants, PLWH had lower neutralizing activity, total antibody, S-IgG, and T-cell-specific immune response levels, compared to HIV-negative individuals, after controlling for types of vaccine, time interval between first and second dose, time after receiving the second dose, and sociodemographic factors. PLWH with a longer interval since HIV diagnosis, who received their second dose 15-28 days prior to study commencement, and who had an interval of ≥21 days between first and second dose had higher neutralizing activity levels. The immunogenicity of the inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines was lower among PLWH as compared to HIV-negative individuals. Vaccination guideline specific for PLWH should be developed.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/immunology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Young Adult
10.
Nat Med ; 28(2): 401-409, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1655605

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants and the waning of vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies suggests that additional coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine doses may be needed for individuals who initially received CoronaVac. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the recombinant adenovirus type 5 (AD5)-vectored COVID-19 vaccine Convidecia as a heterologous booster versus those of CoronaVac as homologous booster in adults previously vaccinated with CoronaVac in an ongoing, randomized, observer-blinded, parallel-controlled phase 4 trial ( NCT04892459 ). Adults who had received two doses of CoronaVac in the past 3-6 months were vaccinated with Convidecia (n = 96) or CoronaVac (n = 102). Adults who had received one dose of CoronaVac in the past 1-3 months were also vaccinated with Convidecia (n = 51) or CoronaVac (n = 50). The co-primary endpoints were the occurrence of adverse reactions within 28 d after vaccination and geometric mean titers (GMTs) of neutralizing antibodies against live wild-type SARS-CoV-2 virus at 14 d after booster vaccination. Adverse reactions after vaccination were significantly more frequent in Convidecia recipients but were generally mild to moderate in all treatment groups. Heterologous boosting with Convidecia elicited significantly increased GMTs of neutralizing antibody against SARS-CoV-2 than homologous boosting with CoronaVac in participants who had previously received one or two doses of CoronaVac. These data suggest that heterologous boosting with Convidecia following initial vaccination with CoronaVac is safe and more immunogenic than homologous boosting.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adenoviridae/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Female , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Injection Site Reaction/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Young Adult
11.
Viruses ; 14(1)2021 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1639272

ABSTRACT

Inactivated vaccines based on cell culture are very useful in the prevention and control of many diseases. The most popular strategy for the production of inactivated vaccines is based on monkey-derived Vero cells, which results in high productivity of the virus but has a certain carcinogenic risk due to non-human DNA contamination. Since human diploid cells, such as MRC-5 cells, can produce a safer vaccine, efforts to develop a strategy for inactivated vaccine production using these cells have been investigated using MRC-5 cells. However, most viruses do not replicate efficiently in MRC-5 cells. In this study, we found that rabies virus (RABV) infection activated a robust interferon (IFN)-ß response in MRC-5 cells but almost none in Vero cells, suggesting that the IFN response could be a key limiting factor for virus production. Treatment of the MRC-5 cells with IFN inhibitors increased RABV titers by 10-fold. Additionally, the RABV titer yield was improved five-fold when using IFN receptor 1 (IFNAR1) antibodies. As such, we established a stable IFNAR1-deficient MRC-5 cell line (MRC-5IFNAR1-), which increased RABV production by 6.5-fold compared to normal MRC-5 cells. Furthermore, in a pilot-scale production in 1500 square centimeter spinner flasks, utilization of the MRC-5IFNAR1- cell line or the addition of IFN inhibitors to MRC cells increased RABV production by 10-fold or four-fold, respectively. Thus, we successfully established a human diploid cell-based pilot scale virus production platform via inhibition of IFN response for rabies vaccines, which could also be used for other inactivated virus vaccine production.


Subject(s)
Diploidy , Interferons/pharmacology , Rabies Vaccines/immunology , Rabies virus , Rabies/prevention & control , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Gene Expression , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/genetics , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vero Cells
12.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 477-481, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625890

ABSTRACT

The massive and rapid transmission of SARS-CoV-2 has led to the emergence of several viral variants of concern (VOCs), with the most recent one, B.1.1.529 (Omicron), which accumulated a large number of spike mutations, raising the specter that this newly identified variant may escape from the currently available vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Using VSV-based pseudovirus, we found that Omicron variant is markedly resistant to neutralization of sera from convalescents or individuals vaccinated by two doses of inactivated whole-virion vaccines (BBIBP-CorV). However, a homologous inactivated vaccine booster or a heterologous booster with protein subunit vaccine (ZF2001) significantly increased neutralization titers to both WT and Omicron variant. Moreover, at day 14 post the third dose, neutralizing antibody titer reduction for Omicron was less than that for convalescents or individuals who had only two doses of the vaccine, indicating that a homologous or heterologous booster can reduce the Omicron escape from neutralizing. In addition, we tested a panel of 17 SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Omicron resists seven of eight authorized/approved mAbs, as well as most of the other mAbs targeting distinct epitopes on RBD and NTD. Taken together, our results suggest the urgency to push forward the booster vaccination to combat the emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization, Secondary , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage
13.
Lancet ; 398(10296): 213-222, 2021 07 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598580

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: CoronaVac, an inactivated whole-virion SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, has been shown to be well tolerated with a good safety profile in individuals aged 18 years and older in phase 1/2 trials, and provided a good humoral response against SARS-CoV-2. We present the interim efficacy and safety results of a phase 3 clinical trial of CoronaVac in Turkey. METHODS: This was a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial. Volunteers aged 18-59 years with no history of COVID-19 and with negative PCR and antibody test results for SARS-CoV-2 were enrolled at 24 centres in Turkey. Exclusion criteria included (but were not limited to) immunosuppressive therapy (including steroids) within the past 6 months, bleeding disorders, asplenia, and receipt of any blood products or immunoglobulins within the past 3 months. The K1 cohort consisted of health-care workers (randomised in a 1:1 ratio), and individuals other than health-care workers were also recruited into the K2 cohort (randomised in a 2:1 ratio) using an interactive web response system. The study vaccine was 3 µg inactivated SARS-CoV-2 virion adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide in a 0·5 mL aqueous suspension. Participants received either vaccine or placebo (consisting of all vaccine components except inactivated virus) intramuscularly on days 0 and 14. The primary efficacy outcome was the prevention of PCR-confirmed symptomatic COVID-19 at least 14 days after the second dose in the per protocol population. Safety analyses were done in the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04582344) and is active but no longer recruiting. FINDINGS: Among 11 303 volunteers screened between Sept 14, 2020, and Jan 5, 2021, 10 218 were randomly allocated. After exclusion of four participants from the vaccine group because of protocol deviations, the intention-to-treat group consisted of 10 214 participants (6646 [65·1%] in the vaccine group and 3568 [34·9%] in the placebo group) and the per protocol group consisted of 10 029 participants (6559 [65·4%] and 3470 [34·6%]) who received two doses of vaccine or placebo. During a median follow-up period of 43 days (IQR 36-48), nine cases of PCR-confirmed symptomatic COVID-19 were reported in the vaccine group (31·7 cases [14·6-59·3] per 1000 person-years) and 32 cases were reported in the placebo group (192·3 cases [135·7-261·1] per 1000 person-years) 14 days or more after the second dose, yielding a vaccine efficacy of 83·5% (95% CI 65·4-92·1; p<0·0001). The frequencies of any adverse events were 1259 (18·9%) in the vaccine group and 603 (16·9%) in the placebo group (p=0·0108) with no fatalities or grade 4 adverse events. The most common systemic adverse event was fatigue (546 [8·2%] participants in the vaccine group and 248 [7·0%] the placebo group, p=0·0228). Injection-site pain was the most frequent local adverse event (157 [2·4%] in the vaccine group and 40 [1·1%] in the placebo group, p<0·0001). INTERPRETATION: CoronaVac has high efficacy against PCR-confirmed symptomatic COVID-19 with a good safety and tolerability profile. FUNDING: Turkish Health Institutes Association.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Double-Blind Method , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Turkey , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Virion/immunology
14.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 212-226, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585243

ABSTRACT

The recent emergence of COVID-19 variants has necessitated the development of new vaccines that stimulate the formation of high levels of neutralizing antibodies against S antigen variants. A new strategy involves the intradermal administration of heterologous vaccines composed of one or two doses of inactivated vaccine and a booster dose with the mutated S1 protein (K-S). Such vaccines improve the immune efficacy by increasing the neutralizing antibody titers and promoting specific T cell responses against five variants of the RBD protein. A viral challenge test with the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant confirmed that both administration schedules (i.e. "1 + 1" and "2 + 1") ensured protection against this strain. These results suggest that the aforementioned strategy is effective for protecting against new variants and enhances the anamnestic immune response in the immunized population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CHO Cells , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetulus , Female , Humans , Macaca mulatta , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vero Cells
15.
Lancet ; 398(10317): 2173-2184, 2021 12 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We report the clinical efficacy against COVID-19 infection of BBV152, a whole virion inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine formulated with a toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist molecule adsorbed to alum (Algel-IMDG) in Indian adults. METHODS: We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, phase 3 clinical trial in 25 Indian hospitals or medical clinics to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and immunological lot consistency of BBV152. Adults (age ≥18 years) who were healthy or had stable chronic medical conditions (not an immunocompromising condition or requiring treatment with immunosuppressive therapy) were randomised 1:1 with a computer-generated randomisation scheme (stratified for the presence or absence of chronic conditions) to receive two intramuscular doses of vaccine or placebo administered 4 weeks apart. Participants, investigators, study coordinators, study-related personnel, the sponsor, and nurses who administered the vaccines were masked to treatment group allocation; an unmasked contract research organisation and a masked expert adjudication panel assessed outcomes. The primary outcome was the efficacy of the BBV152 vaccine in preventing a first occurrence of laboratory-confirmed (RT-PCR-positive) symptomatic COVID-19 (any severity), occurring at least 14 days after the second dose in the per-protocol population. We also assessed safety and reactogenicity throughout the duration of the study in all participants who had received at least one dose of vaccine or placebo. This report contains interim results (data cutoff May 17, 2021) regarding immunogenicity and safety outcomes (captured on days 0 to 56) and efficacy results with a median of 99 days for the study population. The trial was registered on the Indian Clinical Trials Registry India, CTRI/2020/11/028976, and ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04641481 (active, not recruiting). FINDINGS: Between Nov 16, 2020, and Jan 7, 2021, we recruited 25 798 participants who were randomly assigned to receive BBV152 or placebo; 24 419 received two doses of BBV152 (n=12 221) or placebo (n=12 198). Efficacy analysis was dependent on having 130 cases of symptomatic COVID-19, which occurred when 16 973 initially seronegative participants had at least 14 days follow-up after the second dose. 24 (0·3%) cases occurred among 8471 vaccine recipients and 106 (1·2%) among 8502 placebo recipients, giving an overall estimated vaccine efficacy of 77·8% (95% CI 65·2-86·4). In the safety population (n=25 753), 5959 adverse events occurred in 3194 participants. BBV152 was well tolerated; the same proportion of participants reported adverse events in the vaccine group (1597 [12·4%] of 12 879) and placebo group (1597 [12·4%] of 12 874), with no clinically significant differences in the distributions of solicited, unsolicited, or serious adverse events between the groups, and no cases of anaphylaxis or vaccine-related deaths. INTERPRETATION: BBV152 was highly efficacious against laboratory-confirmed symptomatic COVID-19 disease in adults. Vaccination was well tolerated with no safety concerns raised in this interim analysis. FUNDING: Bharat Biotech International and Indian Council of Medical Research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Adult , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , India , Male
16.
Methods Mol Biol ; 2410: 229-263, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575944

ABSTRACT

Vaccines are one of mankind's greatest medical advances, and their use has drastically reduced and in some cases eliminated (e.g., smallpox) disease and death caused by infectious agents. Traditional vaccine modalities including live-attenuated pathogen vaccines, wholly inactivated pathogen vaccines, and protein-based pathogen subunit vaccines have successfully been used to create efficacious vaccines against measles, mumps, rubella, polio, and yellow fever. These traditional vaccine modalities, however, take many months to years to develop and have thus proven less effective for use in creating vaccines to emerging or reemerging infectious diseases (EIDs) including influenza, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), dengue virus (DENV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), West Nile virus (WNV), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses 1 and 2 (SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2). As factors such as climate change and increased globalization continue to increase the pace of EID development, newer vaccine modalities are required to develop vaccines that can prevent or attenuate EID outbreaks throughout the world. One such modality, DNA vaccines, has been studied for over 30 years and has numerous qualities that make them ideal for meeting the challenge of EIDs including; (1) DNA vaccine candidates can be designed within hours of publishing of a pathogens genetic sequence; (2) they can be manufactured cheaply and rapidly in large quantities; (3) they are thermostable and have reduced requirement for a cold-chain during distribution, and (4) they have a remarkable safety record in the clinic. Optimizations made in plasmid design as well as in DNA vaccine delivery have greatly improved the immunogenicity of these vaccines. Here we describe the process of making a DNA vaccine to an EID pathogen and describe methods used for assessing the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines in small animal models.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Vaccines, DNA , Viral Vaccines , Animals , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control , Humans , Immunity , SARS Virus , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Viral Vaccines/genetics , Viral Vaccines/immunology
18.
Transplantation ; 106(4): 853-861, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560559

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 mRNA vaccines elicit lower humoral responses in solid-organ transplant recipients. This is the first prospective trial investigating the effect of an inactivated whole-virion vaccine in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS: Prospective, single-center, phase 4, interventional study. Kidney transplant recipients aged 30-69 y with >30 d of transplantation received two 3 µg intramuscular doses of CoronaVac 28 d apart and are being followed for 6 mo. Primary outcomes: (1) reactogenicity after first dose; (2) antibody responses 28 d after each dose; and (3) incidence/severity of confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and 28-d lethality rate. For this analysis, clinical effectiveness was assessed for 3 mo, starting 15 d after the second dose, and compared with 3-mo period before vaccination. RESULTS: Of the 3371 individuals who received the first dose, 99% completed vaccination schedule. Mild/local adverse reactions were reported by 33% of the patients. In the immunogenicity cohort (n = 942), the proportion of patients with IgG antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 increased from 15.2% after first dose to 43% after second dose. Increase in antibody values after second dose was associated with higher proportion of patients with detected neutralizing antibodies. A significant reduction in the incidence of COVID-19 was observed (6.4% versus 4.2%; P < 0.0001), although the 28-d lethality rate remained unchanged (25% versus 22%; P = 0.534). In 45 patients from the immunogenicity cohort who developed COVID-19, all the 6 deaths occurred among those without antibody response (n = 22; 49%). CONCLUSIONS: CoronaVac vaccine was associated with low reactogenicity, low immunogenicity but reduced incidence of COVID-19 among kidney transplant recipients. The lack of reduction in lethality rates is perhaps associated with the low percentage of patients developing humoral response after the second dose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 772511, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556241

ABSTRACT

Recent exposure to seasonal coronaviruses (sCoVs) may stimulate cross-reactive antibody responses against severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, previous studies have produced divergent results regarding protective or damaging immunity induced by prior sCoV exposure. It remains unknown whether pre-existing humoral immunity plays a role in vaccine-induced neutralization and antibody responses. In this study, we collected 36 paired sera samples from 36 healthy volunteers before and after immunization with inactivated whole-virion SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for COVID-19, and analyzed the distribution and intensity of pre-existing antibody responses at the epitope level pre-vaccination as well as the relationship between pre-existing sCoV immunity and vaccine-induced neutralization. We observed large amounts of pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies in the conserved regions among sCoVs, especially the S2 subunit. Excep t for a few peptides, the IgG and IgM fluorescence intensities against S, M and N peptides did not differ significantly between pre-vaccination and post-vaccination sera of vaccinees who developed a neutralization inhibition rate (%inhibition) <40 and %inhibition ≥40 after two doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Participants with strong and weak pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies (strong pre-CRA; weak pre-CRA) had similar %inhibition pre-vaccination (10.9% ± 2.9% vs. 12.0% ± 2.2%, P=0.990) and post-vaccination (43.8% ± 25.1% vs. 44.6% ± 21.5%, P=0.997). Overall, the strong pre-CRA group did not show a significantly greater increase in antibody responses to the S protein linear peptides post-vaccination compared with the weak pre-CRA group. Therefore, we found no evidence for a significant impact of pre-existing antibody responses on inactivated vaccine-induced neutralization and antibody responses. Our research provides an important basis for inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine use in the context of high sCoV seroprevalence.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cross Reactions/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , Seasons , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology
20.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554851

ABSTRACT

The persistent circulation of SARS-CoV-2 represents an ongoing global threat due to the emergence of new viral variants that can sometimes evade the immune system of previously exposed or vaccinated individuals. We conducted a follow-up study of adult individuals that had received an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, evaluating antibody production and neutralizing activity over a period of 6 months. In addition, we performed mice immunization with inactivated SARS-CoV-2, and evaluated the immune response and pathological outcomes against Gamma and Zeta variant infection. Vaccinated individuals produced high levels of antibodies with robust neutralizing activity, which was significantly reduced against Gamma and Zeta variants. Production of IgG anti-S antibodies and neutralizing activity robustly reduced after 6 months of vaccination. Immunized mice demonstrated cellular response against Gamma and Zeta variants, and after viral infection, reduced viral loads, IL-6 expression, and histopathological outcome in the lungs. TNF levels were unchanged in immunized or not immunized mice after infection with the Gamma variant. Furthermore, serum neutralization activity rapidly increases after infection with the Gamma and Zeta variants. Our data suggest that immunization with inactivated WT SARS-CoV-2 induces a promptly responsive cross-reactive immunity response against the Gamma and Zeta variants, reducing COVID-19 pathological outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross Protection , Cytokines/metabolism , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunization , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Mice , Vaccines, Inactivated/administration & dosage , Viral Load
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