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1.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 23(4): 244-246, 2022 Apr.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765605

ABSTRACT

In the clinical research arsenal, the COVID-19 vaccines are the strongest weapons against the most important worldwide sanitary crisis of the last centuries. Even if vaccine adverse events have mild clinical relevance, several thromboembolic events occurring after adenoviral recombinant vaccine administration have been reported. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after administration of mRNA vaccines have also recently been described. We report the case of a patient who suffered from two rare adverse events after BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine administration (Pfizer-BioNTech): acute myocarditis and pulmonary embolism. Although the temporal consequentiality does not demonstrate a causal link, the strong analogies emerging in the latest clinical reports suggest a possible relation. Further studies are needed to understand the potential mechanisms of myocardial damage and atypical thrombosis. Despite the favorable and self-limiting clinical course of post-vaccinal myocarditis, in these cases a tight follow-up is advisable and vaccine adverse event reporting remains mandatory, especially if not described during pivotal clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Pulmonary Embolism , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Myocarditis/chemically induced , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects
3.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1354, 2021 Dec 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1632816

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) were excluded from the original SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine trials, which may influence vaccine hesitancy in this population. We prospectively characterized the safety and immunogenicity of two-dose SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination in 44 patients with MM, who underwent vaccination from 12/17/2020 to 3/18/2021. RESULTS: Rates adverse reactions were low and consistent with those documented in vaccine trials. Among those on MM therapy, 93% developed detectable anti-receptor binding domain (RBD) antibodies after dose 2, while 94% of patients not on MM therapy seroconverted. CONCLUSIONS: Two-dose SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination is mildly reactogenic and leads to high rates of seroconversion in patients with MM. These findings can provide reassurance to MM patients who are hesitant to receive SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccines.


Subject(s)
/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization Schedule , Multiple Myeloma/blood , /adverse effects , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects
5.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 384-391, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1615765

ABSTRACT

This paper presents the key outcomes of the above WHO informal consultation with global stakeholders including regulatory authorities, vaccine developers and manufacturers, academia and other international health organizations and institutions involved in the development, evaluation and use of messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines. The aim of the consultation was to further clarify the main principles to be presented in an upcoming WHO guidance document on the regulatory considerations in evaluating the quality, safety and efficacy of mRNA prophylactic vaccines for infectious diseases. This WHO guidance document is intended to facilitate global mRNA vaccine development and regulatory convergence in the assessment of such vaccines. The urgent need to develop such a document as a new WHO written standard is outlined in this report along with the key scientific and regulatory challenges. A number of key conclusions are provided at the end of this report along with an update on the steps taken following this meeting.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Diseases/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/therapeutic use , /therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Vaccine Potency , World Health Organization
6.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 42(6): 515-521, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607107

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute allergic reactions to messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines are rare but may limit public health immunization efforts. Objectives: To characterize suspected allergic reactions to the first dose of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mRNA vaccine and to assess the safety and utility of a two-step graded-dose protocol for the second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine in patients with a history of low suspicion of anaphylaxis to their first dose. Methods: This was a retrospective evaluation of referrals to the allergy and immunology clinic for a presumed allergic reaction to the first dose of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) between December 17, 2020, and February 28, 2021. Recommendations for the second dose and outcomes were evaluated by trained board-certified allergists. Results: Seventy-seven patients presented with a Pfizer-BioNTech reaction (56 [72.7%]) or with a Moderna reaction (21 [27.3%]). Most patients (69.7%) had symptom onset within 4 hours. Most commonly reported symptoms were cutaneous (51.9%), cardiovascular (48.1%), and respiratory (33.8%) symptoms. Recommendations included to proceed with the single dose (70.1%), two-step graded dose (19.5%), or deferral (10.4%). Twelve of 15 patients completed the second dose with a graded-dose protocol. Of these patients, five reported at least one or more similar symptoms as experienced with their first dose. Conclusion: Of the patients with presumed allergic reactions to their first dose of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine, most were able to safely receive the second dose. For those with a low suspicion of anaphylaxis, the two-step graded protocol with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine was well tolerated. A graded-dose protocol could be an effective strategy for second-dose vaccination in those who may otherwise defer the second dose.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hypersensitivity , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
7.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(3): e87-e89, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608728

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology of multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS) in children (MIS-C) is unknown. It occurs several weeks after COVID-19 infection or exposure; however, MIS is rarely reported after COVID-19 vaccination, and cases are mostly in adults. Herein, we present a 12-year-old male who had no prior COVID-19 infection or exposure and developed MIS-C after his first dose of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Diagnosis, Differential , Drug Therapy, Combination , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy
8.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 43(1): 40-43, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607225

ABSTRACT

Background: As the vaccination campaign in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues, concerns with regard to adverse reactions to the vaccine remain. Although immediate hypersensitivity reactions have received much attention, delayed systemic urticarial reactions after vaccination can occur. Objective: To describe the clinical presentation, vaccine excipient skin testing results, and outcomes of subsequent COVID-19 vaccination in patients who experienced delayed systemic urticarial reactions after messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccination. Methods: This was a retrospective case series of 12 patients referred to the Mayo Clinics in Rochester, Minnesota, and Jacksonville, Florida, between January 19, 2021, and April 30, 2021, for evaluation of delayed systemic urticarial reactions after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. Demographics, medical and allergic history, reaction details, vaccine excipient skin testing results (when performed), and the outcome after subsequent vaccination were collected for each patient. Results: The mean age of the patients was 52 years, all were white, and 9 (75%) were women. Half of the patients had a history of drug allergy, and one had a history of chronic spontaneous urticaria. Seven patients reacted to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine and five reacted to the Moderna vaccine. Seven patients developed symptoms between 8 and 24 hours after vaccination. Nine patients required antihistamines for treatment. The median time to symptom resolution was 4 days. Nine patients underwent allergist-directed COVID-19 vaccine excipient skin testing, all of which were negative. Ten patients chose to receive their next mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose, and four patients experienced recurrent delayed urticaria. Conclusion: Delayed systemic urticarial reactions after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination were not life-threatening, could be treated with antihistamines, and were not predicted with vaccine excipient skin testing. They were not a contraindication to subsequent vaccination, although patients should be counseled with regard to the possibility of recurrence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Urticaria , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Histamine Antagonists/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Urticaria/chemically induced , Urticaria/diagnosis , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccine Excipients/adverse effects
9.
Allergy Asthma Proc ; 43(1): 37-39, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604942

ABSTRACT

Background: After Emergency Use Authorization of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines, guidance was provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that persons with an immediate allergic reaction to a messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccine should be evaluated by an allergist/immunologist before receipt of the second dose. Methods: In vaccinating health-care personnel, we referred those with significant reactions to allergy/immunology specialists so that they could safely receive the second dose. Results: We found that many reactions after the first dose were nonallergic but could be debilitating and a barrier to the second dose. We created a protocol of premedications to allow health-care personnel to safely receive their second mRNA COVID-19 vaccine dose. Conclusion: This protocol is adaptable and can be used in settings where allergy/immunology referral is not immediately available.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects , Anaphylaxis/chemically induced , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , RNA, Messenger
10.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 128(2): 153-160, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597012

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The mechanism of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine hypersensitivity reactions is unknown. COVID-19 vaccine excipient skin testing has been used in evaluation of these reactions, but its utility in predicting subsequent COVID-19 vaccine tolerance is also unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility of COVID-19 vaccine and vaccine excipient skin testing in both patients with an allergic reaction to their first messenger RNA COVID-19 vaccine dose and patients with a history of polyethylene glycol allergy who have not yet received a COVID-19 vaccine dose. METHODS: In this multicenter, retrospective review, COVID-19 vaccine and vaccine excipient skin testing was performed in patients referred to 1 of 3 large tertiary academic institutions. Patient medical records were reviewed after skin testing to determine subsequent COVID-19 vaccine tolerance. RESULTS: A total of 129 patients underwent skin testing, in whom 12 patients (9.3%) had positive results. There were 101 patients who received a COVID-19 vaccine after the skin testing, which was tolerated in 90 patients (89.1%) with no allergic symptoms, including 5 of 6 patients with positive skin testing results who received a COVID-19 vaccine after the skin testing. The remaining 11 patients experienced minor allergic symptoms after COVID-19 vaccination, none of whom required treatment beyond antihistamines. CONCLUSION: The low positivity rate of COVID-19 vaccine excipient skin testing and high rate of subsequent COVID-19 vaccine tolerance suggest a low utility of this method in evaluation of COVID-19 vaccine hypersensitivity reactions. Focus should shift to the use of existing vaccine allergy practice parameters, with consideration of graded dosing when necessary. On the basis of these results, strict avoidance of subsequent COVID-19 vaccination should be discouraged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Hypersensitivity , Skin Tests , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Hypersensitivity/etiology , Medical Futility , Retrospective Studies , Vaccine Excipients/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects
11.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(3): e104-e105, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592757

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a serious complication that is observed most commonly in pediatric patients following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections. However, the mechanism and predictors of disease are poorly understood. There are no prior reports of MIS-C among patients who have been fully vaccinated, and only a single case of MIS in an adult patient who had received his second shot just 4 days prior to symptom onset. Here, we present an adolescent with sickle cell disease who was fully vaccinated against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and had no prior history of known or suspected infection, who presented in shock and was ultimately diagnosed with MIS-C. This case highlights the importance of clinical suspicion for MIS-C even when patients are fully vaccinated.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Sickle Cell/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects , Adolescent , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diagnosis, Differential , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy
12.
Int J Rheum Dis ; 25(3): 353-363, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583715

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Considering the concerns regarding the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) vaccine safety among pediatric patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD) due to a lack of data, an urgent need for studies evaluating safety profiles of vaccines emerged. METHODS: Among participants vaccinated by CoronaVac inactive SARS-CoV-2 or BNT162b2 messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 (Pfizer-BioNTech) vaccine, healthy children under 18 and patients under 21 with an at least 1-year follow-up period in our department for a childhood-onset rheumatic disease were included into this cross-sectional study. RESULTS: Overall, 246 subjects (141 [57.3%] females) (biologic group: 43, non-biologic group: 180, healthy control group: 23) were eligible for the study. The median age was 15.34 (12.02-20.92) years. The most common adverse events were fatigue (n = 68, 27.6%), headache (n = 44, 17.9%), myalgia (n = 38, 15.4%), arthralgia (n = 38, 15.4%), and fever (n = 35, 14.2%). Only 3 subjects (2 patients with familial Mediterranean fever, and one healthy child) were considered to experienced serious adverse events, since they required hospitalization. Local reactions were seen in 20 (8.13%), and 27 patients (12.1%) had disease flares within 1 month after the vaccines. Although it was significantly higher in those who received the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine (P < .001), there was no significant relationship between adverse event frequency and age, gender, the existing diseases, ongoing treatment regimens and pre-vaccination COVID-19 histories. CONCLUSION: Although immunogenicity studies for efficacy of the vaccines and long-term follow-up studies for adverse events monitoring are required, our study indicates an acceptable safety profile of COVID-19 vaccines and encourages children with IRD to be vaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Rheumatic Diseases/complications , Adolescent , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Young Adult , /adverse effects
14.
Clin Pharmacol Ther ; 111(3): 605-613, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549188

ABSTRACT

Myocarditis and pericarditis may constitute adverse reactions of mRNA coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines. This study aimed to document these reactions and to assess the association with patient sex and age. This is as an observational retrospective study using a case-non-case design (also called disproportionality study) on inflammatory heart reactions reported with mRNA COVID-19 vaccines within the World Health Organization (WHO) global safety database (VigiBase), up to June 30, 2021. Results are expressed using reporting odds ratios (RORs) and their 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Of 716,576 reports related to mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, 2,277 were cases of inflammatory heart reactions, including 1241 (55%) myocarditis and 851 (37%) pericarditis. The main age group was 18-29 years (704, 31%), and mostly male patients (1,555, 68%). Pericarditis onset was delayed compared with myocarditis with a median time to onset of 8 (3-21) vs. 3 (2-6) days, respectively (P = 0.001). Regarding myocarditis, an important disproportionate reporting was observed in adolescents (ROR, 22.3, 95% CI 19.2-25.9) and in 18-29 years old (ROR, 6.6, 95% CI 5.9-7.5) compared with older patients, as well as in male patients (ROR, 9.4, 95% CI 8.3-10.6). Reporting rate of myocarditis was increased in young adults and adolescents. Inflammatory heart reactions may rarely occur shortly following mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. Although an important disproportionate reporting of myocarditis was observed among adolescents and young adults, particularly in male patients, reporting rates support a very rare risk, that does not seem to compromise the largely positive benefit-risk balance of these vaccines. Furthermore, this study confirmed the value of disproportionality analyses for estimation of relative risks among subgroups of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Myocarditis/chemically induced , Myocarditis/epidemiology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
15.
J Clin Invest ; 131(23)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546629

ABSTRACT

BackgroundSARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications and neonatal respiratory distress and hospitalization. Effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in pregnant women is not known.MethodsAll women with confirmed pregnancy who presented to the national referral hospital in Qatar between December 20, 2020, and May 30, 2021, with at least 1 SARS-CoV-2 test and not testing prior to pregnancy were included. We determined the vaccine effectiveness of mRNA vaccines in preventing confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy using both cohort and test-negative case-control designs. Analyses were adjusted for age group, nationality, and gestational age.ResultsAmong 4534 pregnant women, there were 407 vaccinated and 407 unvaccinated women in the matched cohort analysis. Vaccine effectiveness was 87.6% (95%CI 44.1%-97.2%) at least 14 days after the second dose. There were 386 test-positive and 834 matched women in the test-negative case control analysis. Vaccine effectiveness was 86.8% (95%CI 47.5%-98.5%) at least 14 days after the second dose. Adjustment for age, nationality, and gestational age yielded similar results for both designs. In the test-negative analysis, vaccine effectiveness at least 14 days after the first dose but before the second dose was 40.8% (95% CI 0.0%-80.4%). Of the 386 test-positive pregnant women, 74 cases were Alpha variant, 163 cases were Beta variant, and 156 cases were variants of unknown status. There were 9 severe or critical disease cases and no deaths in the test-positive pregnant women, all of whom were unvaccinated.ConclusionThe mRNA vaccines provide a high level of protection against documented SARS-CoV-2 infection, which supports the inclusion of pregnant women in vaccination campaigns.FUNDINGHamad Medical Corporation, Weill Cornell Medicine Qatar, and the Ministry of Public Health Qatar.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects
16.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6486-6495, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544303

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines currently undergoing clinical trials. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched to collect open human COVID-19 vaccines randomized controlled trials, without limiting the search time and language. The research papers collected in the above-mentioned databases were initially screened according to the title and abstract content and merged, and the repeated ones were removed. After reading the full text of the remaining research, the studies that did not meet the inclusion criteria were excluded, and finally, nine studies were obtained. After extracting the statistical data of adverse events in the study, load them into Review Manager for heterogeneity analysis. RESULTS: The incidence of adverse reactions of inactivated virus vaccines, RNA vaccines, and adenovirus vector vaccines was higher than that of placebo. Common adverse reactions included pain, swelling, and fever at the injection site. CONCLUSION: From the perspective of effectiveness, RNA vaccine > adenovirus vector vaccine > inactivated virus vaccine. From the perspective of safety, the incidence of adverse reactions of the three vaccines is higher than that of a placebo, and the incidence of adverse reactions of the adenovirus vector vaccine is higher.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adenovirus Vaccines/adverse effects , Adenovirus Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , Vaccination , Vaccines, Inactivated/adverse effects , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
17.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 128(2): 161-168.e1, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536424

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Allergic and nonallergic adverse reactions have been reported with global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination. It was previously hypothesized that polyethylene glycol (PEG) may be responsible for anaphylactic reactions to messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccines. OBJECTIVE: To report the workflow established at our institution, types, and frequency of adverse reactions to mRNA COVID-19 vaccines in patients presenting for allergy evaluation. METHODS: A COVID-19 vaccine adverse reaction registry was established. We used PEG prick skin testing, followed by PEG challenges in selected cases, to ensure PEG tolerance and encourage completion of COVID-19 vaccination series. RESULTS: A total of 113 patients were included. Most vaccine reactions (86.7%) occurred in women. Anaphylaxis occurred only in women, all of which had a history of allergic disease and two-thirds had asthma. Anaphylaxis rate was 40.6 cases per million. None of the anaphylactic cases developed hypotension, required intubation, or required hospital admission. Systemic allergic symptoms, not fulfilling anaphylaxis criteria, were significantly more common in Pfizer-BioNTech than Moderna-vaccinated patients (P = .02). We observed a higher incidence of dermatologic nonurticarial reactions in men (P = .004). Among first-dose reactors, 86.7% received and tolerated the second dose. We observed a high rate of false-positive intradermal skin test results and frequent subjective symptoms with oral PEG challenge. CONCLUSION: Intradermal PEG testing has limited utility in evaluating anaphylaxis to mRNA vaccines. Most severe postvaccination allergic symptoms are not caused by hypersensitivity to PEG. Most people with reaction to the initial mRNA vaccine can be safely revaccinated. Patients with anaphylaxis to COVID-19 vaccines benefit from physician-observed vaccination.


Subject(s)
Anaphylaxis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Anaphylaxis/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Polyethylene Glycols/adverse effects , Skin Tests , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects
19.
Am J Cardiovasc Drugs ; 22(1): 9-26, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530485

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the novel coronavirus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has affected human lives across the globe. On 11 December 2020, the US FDA granted an emergency use authorization for the first COVID-19 vaccine, and vaccines are now widely available. Undoubtedly, the emergence of these vaccines has led to substantial relief, helping alleviate the fear and anxiety around the COVID-19 illness for both the general public and clinicians. However, recent cases of vaccine complications, including myopericarditis, have been reported after administration of COVID-19 vaccines. This article discusses the cases, possible pathogenesis of myopericarditis, and treatment of the condition. Most cases were mild and should not yet change vaccine policies, although prospective studies are needed to better assess the risk-benefit ratios in different groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Myocarditis , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Myocarditis/drug therapy , Myocarditis/etiology , Myocarditis/pathology , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , /adverse effects
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