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1.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 80: 104-112, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to examine the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated impact on the provision of vascular services, and the pattern of presentation and practice in a tertiary referral vascular unit. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study from a prospectively maintained data-base comparing two time frames, Period 1(15th March-30th May 2019-P1) and Period 2(15th March-30th May 2020-P2)All the patients who presented for a vascular review in the 2 timeframes were included. Metrics of service and patient care episodes were collected and compared including, the number of emergency referrals, patient encounters, consultations, emergency admissions and interventions. Impact on key hospital resources such as critical care and imaging facilities during the two time periods were also examined. RESULTS: There was an absolute reduction of 44% in the number of patients who required urgent or emergency treatment from P1 to P2 (141 vs 79). We noted a non-significant trend towards an increase in the proportion of patients presenting with Chronic Limb Threatening Ischaemia (CLTI) Rutherford 5&6 (P=0.09) as well as a reduction in the proportion of admissions related to Aortic Aneurysm (P=0.21). There was a significant absolute reduction of 77% in all vascular interventions from P1 to P2 with the greatest reductions noted in Carotid (P=0.02), Deep Venous (P=0.003) and Aortic interventions (P=0.016). The number of lower limb interventions also decreased though there was a significant increase as a relative proportion of all vascular interventions in P2 (P=0.001). There was an absolute reduction in the number of scans performed for vascular pathology; Duplex scans reduced by 86%(P<0.002), CT scans by 68%(P<0.003) and MRIs by 74%(P<0.009). CONCLUSION: We report a decrease in urgent and emergency vascular presentations, admissions and interventions. The reduction in patients presenting with lower limb pathology was not as significant as other vascular conditions, resulting in a significant rise in interventions for CLTI and DFI as a proportion of all vascular interventions. These observations will help guide the provision of vascular services during future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Units/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Healthcare/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Facilities and Services Utilization , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , United Kingdom
2.
Am J Surg ; 223(1): 176-181, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568479

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Perioperative inefficiency can increase cost. We describe a process improvement initiative that addressed preoperative delays on an academic vascular surgery service. METHODS: First case vascular surgeries from July 2019-January 2020 were retrospectively reviewed for delays, defined as late arrival to the operating room (OR). A stakeholder group spearheaded by a surgeon-informaticist analyzed this process and implemented a novel electronic medical records (EMR) preoperative tool with improved preoperative workflow and role delegation; results were reviewed for 3 months after implementation. RESULTS: 57% of cases had first case on-time starts with average delay of 19 min. Inappropriate preoperative orders were identified as a dominant delay source (average delay = 38 min). Three months post-implementation, 53% of first cases had on-time starts with average delay of 11 min (P < 0.05). No delays were due to missing orders. CONCLUSIONS: Inconsistent preoperative workflows led to inappropriate orders and delays, increasing cost and decreasing quality. A novel EMR tool subsequently reduced delays with projected savings of $1,200/case. Workflow standardization utilizing informatics can increase efficiency, raising the value of surgical care.


Subject(s)
Cost Savings/statistics & numerical data , Efficiency, Organizational/economics , Medical Informatics , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Vascular Surgical Procedures/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/economics , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Efficiency, Organizational/standards , Efficiency, Organizational/statistics & numerical data , Health Plan Implementation/organization & administration , Health Plan Implementation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Operating Rooms/economics , Operating Rooms/standards , Operating Rooms/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Program Evaluation , Quality Improvement , Retrospective Studies , Root Cause Analysis/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/economics , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Workflow
3.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 112, 2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who undergo surgery have impaired postoperative outcomes and increased mortality. Consequently, elective and semi-urgent operations on the increasing number of patients severely affected by COVID-19 have been indefinitely postponed.in many countries with unclear implications on disease progression and overall survival. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the establishment of a standardized screening program for acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is sufficient to ensure high-quality medical and surgical treatment of COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients while minimizing in-hospital SARS-CoV-2 transmission. METHODS: The screening program comprised polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of nasopharyngeal swabs and a standardized questionnaire about potential symptoms for SARS-CoV-2 infection. All elective and emergency patients admitted to the surgical department of a tertiary-care hospital center in Lower Franconia, Germany, between March and May 2020 were included and their characteristics were recorded. RESULTS: Out of the study population (n = 657), 509 patients (77.5%) had at least one risk factor for a potentially severe course of COVID-19 and 164 patients (25%) were active smokers. The average 7-day incidence in Lower Franconia was 24.0/100,000 during the observation period. Preoperative PCR testing revealed four asymptomatic positive patients out of the 657 tested patients. No postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection or transmission could be detected. CONCLUSION: The implementation of a standardized preoperative screening program to both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients can ensure high-quality surgical care while minimizing infection risk for healthcare workers and potential in-hospital transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Infection Control/methods , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Adult , Aged , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Preoperative Care , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
4.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): 630-635, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304013

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the COVER Study is to identify global outcomes and decision making for vascular procedures during the pandemic. BACKGROUND DATA: During its initial peak, there were many reports of delays to vital surgery and the release of several guidelines advising later thresholds for vascular surgical intervention for key conditions. METHODS: An international multi-center observational study of outcomes after open and endovascular interventions. RESULTS: In an analysis of 1103 vascular intervention (57 centers in 19 countries), 71.6% were elective or scheduled procedures. Mean age was 67 ±â€Š14 years (75.6% male). Suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection was documented in 4.0%. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 11.0% [aortic interventions mortality 15.2% (23/151), amputations 12.1% (28/232), carotid interventions 10.7% (11/103), lower limb revascularisations 9.8% (51/521)]. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [odds ratio (OR) 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-3.15] and active lower respiratory tract infection due to any cause (OR 24.94, 95% CI 12.57-241.70) ware associated with mortality, whereas elective or scheduled cases were lower risk (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.22-0.73 and 0.60, 95% CI 0.45-0.98, respectively. After adjustment, antiplatelet (OR 0.503, 95% CI: 0.273-0.928) and oral anticoagulation (OR 0.411, 95% CI: 0.205-0.824) were linked to reduced risk of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality after vascular interventions during this period was unexpectedly high. Suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases were uncommon. Therefore an alternative cause, for example, recommendations for delayed surgery, should be considered. The vascular community must anticipate longer term implications for survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Endovascular Procedures/mortality , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Global Health , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Vascular Surgical Procedures/mortality , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
5.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 34(2): 43-50, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240792

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has placed significant strain on the health and welfare of all health care professionals, including vascular surgeons. This review summarizes the implications of the pandemic on the health and wellness of surgeons and trainees, with a particular focus on those in vascular surgery (VS). A literature review was completed using common resource databases. We provide a brief history of burnout in VS and explore burnout and wellness in VS during this unprecedented pandemic. We then offer recommendations to address mental health needs by the VS workforce and highlight opportunities to address the gaps in the literature. The impact of COVID-19 on the professional and personal lives of surgeons and trainees in VS is notable. More than half of vascular surgeons reported some degree of anxiety. Factors associated with anxiety and burnout include COVID-19 exposure, moral injury, practice changes, and financial impacts. Trainees appeared to have more active coping strategies with dampened rates of anxiety compared to those in practice. Women appear to be disproportionately affected by the pandemic, with higher rates of anxiety and burnout. Groups underrepresented in medicine seemed to have more resilience when it came to burnout, but struggled with other inequities in the health care environment, such as structural racism and isolation. Strategies for addressing burnout include mindfulness practices, exercise, and peer and institutional support. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial mental health impact on the VS workforce globally, as shifts were made in patient care, surgical practice, and work-home life concerns.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons/psychology , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans
6.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 34(2): 37-42, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240791

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has profoundly affected all aspects of medicine and surgery. Vascular surgery practice and interventions were also forced to change in order to deal with new COVID-19-related priorities and emergencies. In this setting, difficulties in aortic disease management were two-fold: new vascular complications related to COVID-19 infection and the need to guarantee prompt and correct treatment for the general "non-COVID-19" population. Furthermore, discomfort deriving from precautions to minimize the risk of virus transmission among patients and among health care professionals, the need to separate COVID-19-positive from COVID-19-negative patients, and the high incidence of postoperative complications in COVID-19 cases created a challenging scenario for cardiac operations. The aim of this review was to provide evidence derived from the published literature (case reports, case series, multicenter experience, and expert opinion) on the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on aortic vascular surgery services and interventions, describing COVID-19-related findings, intraoperative and postoperative outcomes, as well as the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on noninfectious aortic patients.


Subject(s)
Aortic Diseases/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Aortic Diseases/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Facilities and Services Utilization , Humans , Procedures and Techniques Utilization
7.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 34(2): 28-36, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240790

ABSTRACT

Quality improvement programs and clinical trial research experienced disruption due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Vascular registries showed an immediate impact with significant declines in second-quarter vascular procedure volumes witnessed across Europe and the United States. To better understand the magnitude and impact of the pandemic, organizations and study groups sent grass roots surveys to vascular specialists for needs assessment. Several vascular registries responded quickly by insertion of COVID-19 variables into their data collection forms. More than 80% of clinical trials have been reported delayed or not started due to factors that included loss of enrollment from patient concerns or mandated institutional shutdowns, weighing the risk of trial participation on patient safety. Preliminary data of patients undergoing vascular surgery with active COVID-19 infection show inferior outcomes (morbidity) and increased mortality. Disease-specific vascular surgery study collaboratives about COVID-19 were created for the desire to study the disease in a more focused manner than possible through registry outcomes. This review describes the pandemic effect on multiple VASCUNET registries including Germany (GermanVasc), Sweden (SwedVasc), United Kingdom (UK National Vascular Registry), Australia and New Zealand (bi-national Australasian Vascular Audit), as well as the United States (Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative). We will highlight the continued collaboration of VASCUNET with the Vascular Quality Initiative in the International Consortium of Vascular Registries as part of the Medical Device Epidemiology Network coordinated registry network. Vascular registries must remain flexible and responsive to new and future real-world problems affecting vascular patients.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Registries , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Procedures and Techniques Utilization , Quality Improvement
8.
Vasc Endovascular Surg ; 55(6): 601-611, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117767

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is characterized by a pulmonary interstitial compromise which can require intensive care unit (ICU) and mechanical ventilation. Covid patients develop a wide range of pathologies. This study aims to identify the impact of COVID-19 in diseases commonly treated by vascular surgeons. METHODS: Four conditions were selected: venous thromboembolism (VTE), pulmonary embolism (PE), peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and microangiopathy. A systematic review of the literature using PRISMA guidelines was. RESULTS: Out of 1195 papers reviewed for conditions in COVID-19 patients relevant to routine vascular surgery practice, 43 papers were included and analyzed. Venous thrombosis was found to be the most common COVID-19 associated pathology with a cumulative incidence of 25% at 7 days and 48% at 14 days. Additionally, D-dimer levels proved to be a good predictor, even in the early stages of the disease with a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 88.5% and a negative predictive value of 94.7%. Patients in the ICU demonstrated a significantly higher risk of developing VTE, even when receiving pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. Although evidence of arterial thrombosis was less common (1% to 16.3%), its consequences were typically more serious, including limb loss and death even in young individuals (OR = 25, 95% CI). Finally, microangiopathy has a wide spectrum of clinical presentations from retinal microangiopathy to other more severe manifestations such as myocardial injury, pulmonary compromise and potential multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Although the pathophysiological pathway by which COVID-19 produces thrombosis is not completely clear, the incidence of both arterial and venous thrombosis is increased. D-dimer screening should be done in all COVID-19 patients, as a predictor of thrombotic complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Peripheral Arterial Disease/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/epidemiology , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Humans , Peripheral Arterial Disease/surgery , Peripheral Arterial Disease/virology , Pulmonary Embolism/surgery , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/surgery , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/virology , Venous Thromboembolism/surgery , Venous Thromboembolism/virology
10.
World Neurosurg ; 148: e172-e181, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The institution-wide response of the University of California San Diego Health system to the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic was founded on rapid development of in-house testing capacity, optimization of personal protective equipment usage, expansion of intensive care unit capacity, development of analytic dashboards for monitoring of institutional status, and implementation of an operating room (OR) triage plan that postponed nonessential/elective procedures. We analyzed the impact of this triage plan on the only academic neurosurgery center in San Diego County, California, USA. METHODS: We conducted a de-identified retrospective review of all operative cases and procedures performed by the Department of Neurosurgery from November 24, 2019, through July 6, 2020, a 226-day period. Statistical analysis involved 2-sample z tests assessing daily case totals over the 113-day periods before and after implementation of the OR triage plan on March 16, 2020. RESULTS: The neurosurgical service performed 1429 surgical and interventional radiologic procedures over the study period. There was no statistically significant difference in mean number of daily total cases in the pre-versus post-OR triage plan periods (6.9 vs. 5.8 mean daily cases; 1-tail P = 0.050, 2-tail P = 0.101), a trend reflected by nearly every category of neurosurgical cases. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of California San Diego Department of Neurosurgery maintained an operative volume that was only modestly diminished and continued to meet the essential neurosurgical needs of a large population. Lessons from our experience can guide other departments as they triage neurosurgical cases to meet community needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Neurosurgery/organization & administration , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Brain Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , California/epidemiology , Cerebrospinal Fluid Shunts/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control , Information Dissemination/methods , Intensive Care Units , Laboratories, Hospital , Multi-Institutional Systems , Operating Rooms , Organizational Policy , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surge Capacity , Triage , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Ventilators, Mechanical/supply & distribution , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
11.
J Vasc Surg ; 73(6): 1876-1880.e1, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065425

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The delays in elective surgery caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have resulted in a substantial backlog of cases. In the present study, we sought to determine the estimated time to recovery for vascular surgery procedures delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic in a regional health system. METHODS: Using data from a 35-hospital regional vascular surgical collaborative consisting of all hospitals performing vascular surgery in the state of Michigan, we estimated the number of delayed surgical cases for adults undergoing carotid endarterectomy, carotid stenting, endovascular and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, and lower extremity bypass. We used seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average models to predict the surgical volume in the absence of the COVID-19 pandemic and historical data to predict the elective surgical recovery time. RESULTS: The median statewide monthly vascular surgical volume for the study period was 439 procedures, with a maximum statewide monthly case volume of 519 procedures. For the month of April 2020, the elective vascular surgery procedural volume decreased by ∼90%. Significant variability was seen in the estimated hospital capacity and estimated number of backlogged cases, with the recovery of elective cases estimated to require ∼8 months. If hospitals across the collaborative were to share the burden of backlogged cases, the recovery could be shortened to ∼3 months. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study of vascular surgical volume in a regional health collaborative, elective surgical procedures decreased by 90%, resulting in a backlog of >700 cases. The recovery time if all hospitals in the collaborative were to share the burden of backlogged cases would be reduced from 8 months to 3 months, underscoring the necessity of regional and statewide policies to minimize patient harm by delays in recovery for elective surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Retrospective Studies
12.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): 630-635, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054410

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the COVER Study is to identify global outcomes and decision making for vascular procedures during the pandemic. BACKGROUND DATA: During its initial peak, there were many reports of delays to vital surgery and the release of several guidelines advising later thresholds for vascular surgical intervention for key conditions. METHODS: An international multi-center observational study of outcomes after open and endovascular interventions. RESULTS: In an analysis of 1103 vascular intervention (57 centers in 19 countries), 71.6% were elective or scheduled procedures. Mean age was 67 ±â€Š14 years (75.6% male). Suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection was documented in 4.0%. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 11.0% [aortic interventions mortality 15.2% (23/151), amputations 12.1% (28/232), carotid interventions 10.7% (11/103), lower limb revascularisations 9.8% (51/521)]. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [odds ratio (OR) 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-3.15] and active lower respiratory tract infection due to any cause (OR 24.94, 95% CI 12.57-241.70) ware associated with mortality, whereas elective or scheduled cases were lower risk (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.22-0.73 and 0.60, 95% CI 0.45-0.98, respectively. After adjustment, antiplatelet (OR 0.503, 95% CI: 0.273-0.928) and oral anticoagulation (OR 0.411, 95% CI: 0.205-0.824) were linked to reduced risk of in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality after vascular interventions during this period was unexpectedly high. Suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases were uncommon. Therefore an alternative cause, for example, recommendations for delayed surgery, should be considered. The vascular community must anticipate longer term implications for survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Endovascular Procedures/mortality , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Global Health , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Vascular Surgical Procedures/mortality , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
13.
Vascular ; 29(6): 856-864, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052392

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The unprecedented pandemic spread of the novel coronavirus has severely impacted the delivery of healthcare services in the United States and around the world, and has exposed a variety of inefficiencies in healthcare infrastructure. Some states have been disproportionately affected such as New York and Michigan. In fact, Detroit and its surrounding areas have been named as the initial Midwest epicenter where over 106,000 cases have been confirmed in April 2020. METHOD, RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Facilities in Southeast Michigan have served as the frontline of the pandemic in the Midwest and in order to cope with the surge, rapid, and in some cases, complete restructuring of care was mandatory to effect change and attempt to deal with the emerging crisis. We describe the initial experience and response of 4 large vascular surgery health systems in Michigan to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Care Rationing , Hospital Restructuring , Infection Control , Resource Allocation , Vascular Diseases , Vascular Surgical Procedures , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Civil Defense/standards , Hospital Restructuring/methods , Hospital Restructuring/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Michigan/epidemiology , Organizational Innovation , Patient Selection , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Vascular Diseases/diagnosis , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Vascular Diseases/surgery , Vascular Surgical Procedures/organization & administration , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
14.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 73: 97-106, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046566

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to report the changes and adaptations of a vascular tertiary center during a global pandemic and the impact on its activity and patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study within the Vascular Surgery ward in Centro Hospitalar Universitário Lisboa Norte, Portugal. All data from surgical, inpatient and outpatient activity were collected from February to June 2020 and compared to the same 5-month period in 2018 and 2019. We ran a descriptive analysis of all data and performed statistical tests for the variation of procedures and admissions between February and June 2018 and the same time period in 2020. RESULTS: During the outbreak, our staff had to be readapted. Six nurses were transferred to COVID-19 units (out of a total of 33 nurses) while 1 of the 7 residents was transferred to an intensive care unit and 1 senior surgeon was put on prophylactic leave. In the outpatient clinic, there was an increase in the number of telemedicine consultations with a greater focus on first-time referrals and urgent cases. There was a significant increase in the total number of elective admissions whereas there were significantly less admissions from an emergency setting (+57% and -54%, respectively, P < 0.001). The vascular surgery team performed a total number of 584 procedures between February and June 2020 (-17.8% compared to 2018 and 2019), with a significant increase in the number of endovascular procedures (P < 0.001) and in the use of local and regional anesthesia (P < 0.001), especially in the Angio Suite (+600%, P < 0.001). Comparing with 2018 and 2019, the surgical team performed less outpatient procedures in early 2020. We reported a significant increase in the total number of procedures for patients with a chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) diagnosis (+21%, P < 0.001). We did not report significant changes in the proportion of other vascular conditions. Regarding mortality, we observed a 16% decrease in the intraoperative mortality (P 0.67). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we assessed the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak in daily activity during the contingency period. During the outbreak, there was an overall decline in outpatient clinics and inpatient admissions. Nevertheless, and despite the restrictions imposed by the pandemic and health authorities, we managed to maintain most procedures for most vascular diseases, particularly for CLTI urgent cases, without a significant increase in the mortality rate. Stringent protective measures for patient and staff or higher use of endovascular techniques and local anesthesia are some of the successful changes implemented in the department. These learned lessons are to be pursued as the pandemic evolves with future outbreaks of COVID-19, such as the current second outbreak currently spreading through Europe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Administration , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Portugal , Retrospective Studies , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Vascular Diseases/mortality , Vascular Diseases/surgery , Vascular Surgical Procedures/organization & administration
15.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 72: 191-195, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1037070

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection represents a serious threat to public health because it leads to a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The region Lombardia (Italy) has suffered from severe problems during the acute phase of the outbreak in Italy (March-April 2020). The aim of our analysis is to report the experience of the Department of Vascular Surgery of Pavia, including the learned lessons and future perspectives, considering that the COVID-19 outbreak is in its acute phase in other continents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Single-center, retrospective, observational study based on extracted data from the medical records of all consecutive COVID-19 patients observed in our Vascular Department between March 1st and April 30th, 2020. We reviewed the records for demographic information, comorbidities, laboratory tests, and anticoagulation treatment at the time of hospital admission. RESULTS: We observed an important reduction in elective and urgent interventions compared to the same period of the previous year; in parallel, we observed an increase in the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized patients, especially with severe infection. In our department, four infections were reported among health workers. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of the COVID19 pandemic on health-care delivery has been massive. A wave of vascular-related complications is expected. Regular SARS-CoV-2 screening, adequate protection, and quick reorganization of health-care resources are still needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/mortality , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243299, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999823

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is having a profound impact on global healthcare. Shortages in staff, operating theatre space and intensive care beds has led to a significant reduction in the provision of surgical care. Even vascular surgery, often insulated from resource scarcity due to its status as an urgent specialty, has limited capacity due to the pandemic. Furthermore, many vascular surgical patients are elderly with multiple comorbidities putting them at increased risk of COVID-19 and its complications. There is an urgent need to investigate the impact on patients presenting to vascular surgeons during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The COvid-19 Vascular sERvice (COVER) study has been designed to investigate the worldwide impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on vascular surgery, at both service provision and individual patient level. COVER is running as a collaborative study through the Vascular and Endovascular Research Network (VERN), an independent, international vascular research collaborative with the support of numerous national and international organisations). The study has 3 'Tiers': Tier 1 is a survey of vascular surgeons to capture longitudinal changes to the provision of vascular services within their hospital; Tier 2 captures data on vascular and endovascular procedures performed during the pandemic; and Tier 3 will capture any deviations to patient management strategies from pre-pandemic best practice. Data submission and collection will be electronic using online survey tools (Tier 1: SurveyMonkey® for service provision data) and encrypted data capture forms (Tiers 2 and 3: REDCap® for patient level data). Tier 1 data will undergo real-time serial analysis to determine longitudinal changes in practice, with country-specific analyses also performed. The analysis of Tier 2 and Tier 3 data will occur on completion of the study as per the pre-specified statistical analysis plan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Endovascular Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Health Impact Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet , Operating Rooms/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialties, Surgical/statistics & numerical data , Surgeons , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
17.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 69: 74-79, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-764229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown period on the number and type of vascular procedures performed in the operating theater. METHODS: A total of 38 patients who underwent 46 vascular procedures during the lockdown period of March 16th until April 30th, 2020, were included. The control groups consisted of 29 patients in 2019 and 54 patients in 2018 who underwent 36 and 66 vascular procedures, respectively, in the same time period. Data were analyzed using SPSS Statistics. RESULTS: Our study shows that the lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a significant increase in the number of major amputations (42% in 2020 vs. 18% and 15% in 2019 and 2020, respectively; P-value 0.019). Furthermore, we observed a statistically significant difference in the degree of tissue loss as categorized by the Rutherford classification (P-value 0.007). During the lockdown period, patients presented with more extensive ischemic damage when than previous years. We observed no difference in vascular surgical care for patients with an aortic aneurysm. CONCLUSIONS: Measurements taken during the lockdown period have a significant effect on non-COVID-19 vascular patient care, which leads to an increased severe morbidity. In the future, policy makers should be aware of the impact of their measurements on vulnerable patient groups such as those with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. For these patients, medical care should be easily accessible and adequate.


Subject(s)
Amputation/statistics & numerical data , Aortic Aneurysm/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Peripheral Vascular Diseases/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Social Control, Formal , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation
18.
CMAJ ; 192(44): E1347-E1356, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To mitigate the effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), jurisdictions worldwide ramped down nonemergent surgeries, creating a global surgical backlog. We sought to estimate the size of the nonemergent surgical backlog during COVID-19 in Ontario, Canada, and the time and resources required to clear the backlog. METHODS: We used 6 Ontario or Canadian population administrative sources to obtain data covering part or all of the period between Jan. 1, 2017, and June 13, 2020, on historical volumes and operating room throughput distributions by surgery type and region, and lengths of stay in ward and intensive care unit (ICU) beds. We used time series forecasting, queuing models and probabilistic sensitivity analysis to estimate the size of the backlog and clearance time for a +10% (+1 day per week at 50% capacity) surge scenario. RESULTS: Between Mar. 15 and June 13, 2020, the estimated backlog in Ontario was 148 364 surgeries (95% prediction interval 124 508-174 589), an average weekly increase of 11 413 surgeries. Estimated backlog clearance time is 84 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI] 46-145), with an estimated weekly throughput of 717 patients (95% CI 326-1367) requiring 719 operating room hours (95% CI 431-1038), 265 ward beds (95% CI 87-678) and 9 ICU beds (95% CI 4-20) per week. INTERPRETATION: The magnitude of the surgical backlog from COVID-19 raises serious implications for the recovery phase in Ontario. Our framework for modelling surgical backlog recovery can be adapted to other jurisdictions, using local data to assist with planning.


Subject(s)
Cardiac Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections , Neoplasms/surgery , Organ Transplantation/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/supply & distribution , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Ontario , Operating Rooms/supply & distribution , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
19.
World Neurosurg ; 144: e204-e209, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720739

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has directly and indirectly impacted health care systems, including residency programs. Social distancing, cancellation of elective cases, and staff re-deployment have compromised clinical and academic teaching. We describe the neurosurgical experience at Emory University during the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact of COVID-19-related policies on resident experience. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all neurosurgical cases performed at Emory University Hospital between March 16, the day cancellation of elective cases was effective, and April 15, 2020, and the same period in the preceding 3 years. For the study period, we collected the number of cases and their distribution by subspecialty along with total hospital charges. RESULTS: Compared with an average of 606 cases performed during the study period over the past 3 years, only 145 neurosurgical cases were performed between March 16 and April 15, 2020, which corresponds to an 80% reduction in case volume and 66% decrease in hospital revenue in 2020. When divided by subspecialty, the most significant reduction was observed in functional (84%; P < 0.01) followed by spine (78%; P < 0.01) surgery, although all subspecialties were significantly impacted. Assessing junior resident experience, we observed a significant reduction in number of neurosurgical admissions (47%; P < 0.01) and bedside procedures (59%; P < 0.01) in the study period in 2020 compared with the past 3 years, with no significant reduction in number of consultations (17%; P > 0.1). CONCLUSIONS: Even at academic centers that were not hugely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, prophylactic and preparedness measures still exhibited an unprecedented toll on neurosurgical resident and fellow experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Georgia , Hospital Charges/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Neuroendoscopy/education , Neuroendoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Vascular Surgical Procedures/education
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