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1.
JAMA ; 326(17): 1690-1702, 2021 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525402

ABSTRACT

Importance: The evidence for benefit of convalescent plasma for critically ill patients with COVID-19 is inconclusive. Objective: To determine whether convalescent plasma would improve outcomes for critically ill adults with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: The ongoing Randomized, Embedded, Multifactorial, Adaptive Platform Trial for Community-Acquired Pneumonia (REMAP-CAP) enrolled and randomized 4763 adults with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 between March 9, 2020, and January 18, 2021, within at least 1 domain; 2011 critically ill adults were randomized to open-label interventions in the immunoglobulin domain at 129 sites in 4 countries. Follow-up ended on April 19, 2021. Interventions: The immunoglobulin domain randomized participants to receive 2 units of high-titer, ABO-compatible convalescent plasma (total volume of 550 mL ± 150 mL) within 48 hours of randomization (n = 1084) or no convalescent plasma (n = 916). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary ordinal end point was organ support-free days (days alive and free of intensive care unit-based organ support) up to day 21 (range, -1 to 21 days; patients who died were assigned -1 day). The primary analysis was an adjusted bayesian cumulative logistic model. Superiority was defined as the posterior probability of an odds ratio (OR) greater than 1 (threshold for trial conclusion of superiority >99%). Futility was defined as the posterior probability of an OR less than 1.2 (threshold for trial conclusion of futility >95%). An OR greater than 1 represented improved survival, more organ support-free days, or both. The prespecified secondary outcomes included in-hospital survival; 28-day survival; 90-day survival; respiratory support-free days; cardiovascular support-free days; progression to invasive mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal mechanical oxygenation, or death; intensive care unit length of stay; hospital length of stay; World Health Organization ordinal scale score at day 14; venous thromboembolic events at 90 days; and serious adverse events. Results: Among the 2011 participants who were randomized (median age, 61 [IQR, 52 to 70] years and 645/1998 [32.3%] women), 1990 (99%) completed the trial. The convalescent plasma intervention was stopped after the prespecified criterion for futility was met. The median number of organ support-free days was 0 (IQR, -1 to 16) in the convalescent plasma group and 3 (IQR, -1 to 16) in the no convalescent plasma group. The in-hospital mortality rate was 37.3% (401/1075) for the convalescent plasma group and 38.4% (347/904) for the no convalescent plasma group and the median number of days alive and free of organ support was 14 (IQR, 3 to 18) and 14 (IQR, 7 to 18), respectively. The median-adjusted OR was 0.97 (95% credible interval, 0.83 to 1.15) and the posterior probability of futility (OR <1.2) was 99.4% for the convalescent plasma group compared with the no convalescent plasma group. The treatment effects were consistent across the primary outcome and the 11 secondary outcomes. Serious adverse events were reported in 3.0% (32/1075) of participants in the convalescent plasma group and in 1.3% (12/905) of participants in the no convalescent plasma group. Conclusions and Relevance: Among critically ill adults with confirmed COVID-19, treatment with 2 units of high-titer, ABO-compatible convalescent plasma had a low likelihood of providing improvement in the number of organ support-free days. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02735707.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , ABO Blood-Group System , Adult , Aged , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Length of Stay , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Failure , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
2.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(10): 1409-1419, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1515633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused substantial morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: To describe monthly clinical trends among adults hospitalized with COVID-19. DESIGN: Pooled cross-sectional study. SETTING: 99 counties in 14 states participating in the Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET). PATIENTS: U.S. adults (aged ≥18 years) hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 during 1 March to 31 December 2020. MEASUREMENTS: Monthly hospitalizations, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, and in-hospital death rates per 100 000 persons in the population; monthly trends in weighted percentages of interventions, including ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor use, among an age- and site-stratified random sample of hospitalized case patients. RESULTS: Among 116 743 hospitalized adults with COVID-19, the median age was 62 years, 50.7% were male, and 40.8% were non-Hispanic White. Monthly rates of hospitalization (105.3 per 100 000 persons), ICU admission (20.2 per 100 000 persons), and death (11.7 per 100 000 persons) peaked during December 2020. Rates of all 3 outcomes were highest among adults aged 65 years or older, males, and Hispanic or non-Hispanic Black persons. Among 18 508 sampled hospitalized adults, use of remdesivir and systemic corticosteroids increased from 1.7% and 18.9%, respectively, in March to 53.8% and 74.2%, respectively, in December. Frequency of ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor use decreased from March (37.8%, 27.8%, and 22.7%, respectively) to December (20.5%, 12.3%, and 12.8%, respectively); use of noninvasive respiratory support increased from March to December. LIMITATION: COVID-NET covers approximately 10% of the U.S. population; findings may not be generalizable to the entire country. CONCLUSION: Rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalization, ICU admission, and death were highest in December 2020, corresponding with the third peak of the U.S. pandemic. The frequency of intensive interventions for management of hospitalized patients decreased over time. These data provide a longitudinal assessment of clinical trends among adults hospitalized with COVID-19 before widespread implementation of COVID-19 vaccines. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospitalization/trends , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care/trends , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Length of Stay/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Young Adult
3.
Crit Care Med ; 49(11): e1151-e1156, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467423

ABSTRACT

TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04420468. OBJECTIVES: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children is frequently associated with shock; endothelial involvement may be one of the underlying mechanisms. We sought to describe endothelial dysfunction during multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children with shock and then assess the relationship between the degree of endothelial involvement and the severity of shock. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: A PICU in a tertiary hospital. PATIENTS: Patients aged under 18 (n = 28) with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and shock, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Correlations between endothelial marker levels and shock severity were assessed using Spearman coefficient. The median (interquartile range) age was 9 years (7.5-11.2 yr). Sixteen children presented with cardiogenic and distributive shock, 10 presented with cardiogenic shock only, and two presented with distributive shock only. The median left ventricular ejection fraction, troponin level, and lactate level were, respectively, 40% (35-45%), 261 ng/mL (131-390 ng/mL), and 3.2 mmol/L (2-4.2 mmol/L). Twenty-five children received inotropes and/or vasopressors; the median Vasoactive and Inotropic Score was 8 (5-28). Plasma levels of angiopoietin-2 (6,426 pg/mL [2,814-11,836 pg/mL]), sE-selectin (130,405 pg/mL [92,987-192,499 pg/mL]), von Willebrand factor antigen (344% [288-378%]), and the angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 ratio (1.111 [0.472-1.524]) were elevated and significantly correlated with the Vasoactive and Inotropic Score (r = 0.45, p = 0.016; r = 0.53, p = 0.04; r = 0.46, p = 0.013; and r = 0.46, p = 0.012, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Endothelial dysfunction is associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-related multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children with shock and may constitute one of the underlying mechanisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Shock/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Angiopoietin-2/blood , Biomarkers , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiotonic Agents/therapeutic use , Child , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Interleukin-6/blood , Lactic Acid/blood , Male , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Shock, Cardiogenic/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Troponin/blood , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Ventricular Function, Left
5.
J Pediatr ; 229: 33-40, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1382573

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the similarities and differences in the evaluation and treatment of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) at hospitals in the US. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a cross-sectional survey from June 16 to July 16, 2020, of US children's hospitals regarding protocols for management of patients with MIS-C. Elements included characteristics of the hospital, clinical definition of MIS-C, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up. We summarized key findings and compared results from centers in which >5 patients had been treated vs those in which ≤5 patients had been treated. RESULTS: In all, 40 centers of varying size and experience with MIS-C participated in this protocol survey. Overall, 21 of 40 centers required only 1 day of fever for MIS-C to be considered. In the evaluation of patients, there was often a tiered approach. Intravenous immunoglobulin was the most widely recommended medication to treat MIS-C (98% of centers). Corticosteroids were listed in 93% of protocols primarily for moderate or severe cases. Aspirin was commonly recommended for mild cases, whereas heparin or low molecular weight heparin were to be used primarily in severe cases. In severe cases, anakinra and vasopressors frequently were recommended; 39 of 40 centers recommended follow-up with cardiology. There were similar findings between centers in which >5 patients vs ≤5 patients had been managed. Supplemental materials containing hospital protocols are provided. CONCLUSIONS: There are many similarities yet key differences between hospital protocols for MIS-C. These findings can help healthcare providers learn from others regarding options for managing MIS-C.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Protocols , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Heparin/therapeutic use , Hospitals , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/therapeutic use , Surveys and Questionnaires , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , United States/epidemiology , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
6.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 7(1)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388517

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the major cause of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. It appears that development of 'cytokine storm' in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia precipitates progression to ARDS. However, severity scores on admission do not predict severity or mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Our objective was to determine whether patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS are clinically distinct, therefore requiring alternative management strategies, compared with other patients with ARDS. We report a single-centre retrospective study comparing the characteristics and outcomes of patients with ARDS with and without SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Two intensive care unit (ICU) cohorts of patients at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham were analysed: SARS-CoV-2 patients admitted between 11 March and 21 April 2020 and all patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from bacterial or viral infection who developed ARDS between 1 January 2017 and 1 November 2019. All data were routinely collected on the hospital's electronic patient records. RESULTS: A greater proportion of SARS-CoV-2 patients were from an Asian ethnic group (p=0.002). SARS-CoV-2 patients had lower circulating leucocytes, neutrophils and monocytes (p<0.0001), but higher CRP (p=0.016) on ICU admission. SARS-CoV-2 patients required a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p=0.01), but had lower vasopressor requirements (p=0.016). DISCUSSION: The clinical syndromes and respiratory mechanics of SARS-CoV-2 and CAP-ARDS are broadly similar. However, SARS-CoV-2 patients initially have a lower requirement for vasopressor support, fewer circulating leukocytes and require prolonged ventilation support. Further studies are required to determine whether the dysregulated inflammation observed in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS may contribute to the increased duration of respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Critical Care/methods , Patient Outcome Assessment , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Mechanics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time , United Kingdom , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
8.
Crit Pathw Cardiol ; 20(2): 100-102, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234149

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To understand the hemodynamic effect of angiotensin II as a vasopressor in patients with shock secondary to COVID-19 infection. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients at a single center with COVID-19 infection and shock who were treated with angiotensin II. The hemodynamic response to angiotensin II was estimated by recording the mean arterial pressure, norepinephrine equivalent dose (NED) and urine output. RESULTS: Ten patients with COVID-19 related shock were treated with angiotensin II. Over the initial 6 hours, the average the NED decreased by 30.4% (from 64.6 to 44 µg/min) without a significant change in the mean arterial pressure (0.7% decrease). Six patients experienced at least a 25% reduction in NED by 6 hours, and 2 experienced at least a 50% reduction. CONCLUSIONS: On average, the hemodynamic response to angiotensin II in COVID-19 related shock was favorable. Two patients had a marked rapid improvement. Given the relationship of SARS-CoV-2 with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, further evaluation of angiotensin II for the treatment of COVID-19 related shock is warranted.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin II/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Shock/drug therapy , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Aged , Arterial Pressure , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Shock/physiopathology , Shock/virology
9.
JCI Insight ; 6(4)2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150281

ABSTRACT

BackgroundMitochondrial DNA (MT-DNA) are intrinsically inflammatory nucleic acids released by damaged solid organs. Whether circulating cell-free MT-DNA quantitation could be used to predict the risk of poor COVID-19 outcomes remains undetermined.MethodsWe measured circulating MT-DNA levels in prospectively collected, cell-free plasma samples from 97 subjects with COVID-19 at hospital presentation. Our primary outcome was mortality. Intensive care unit (ICU) admission, intubation, vasopressor, and renal replacement therapy requirements were secondary outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis determined whether MT-DNA levels were independent of other reported COVID-19 risk factors. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve assessments were used to compare MT-DNA levels with established and emerging inflammatory markers of COVID-19.ResultsCirculating MT-DNA levels were highly elevated in patients who eventually died or required ICU admission, intubation, vasopressor use, or renal replacement therapy. Multivariate regression revealed that high circulating MT-DNA was an independent risk factor for these outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities. We also found that circulating MT-DNA levels had a similar or superior area under the curve when compared against clinically established measures of inflammation and emerging markers currently of interest as investigational targets for COVID-19 therapy.ConclusionThese results show that high circulating MT-DNA levels are a potential early indicator for poor COVID-19 outcomes.FundingWashington University Institute of Clinical Translational Sciences COVID-19 Research Program and Washington University Institute of Clinical Translational Sciences (ICTS) NIH grant UL1TR002345.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Cell-Free Nucleic Acids/blood , DNA, Mitochondrial/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6488, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146197

ABSTRACT

Prisons in the United States have become a hotbed for spreading COVID-19 among incarcerated individuals. COVID-19 cases among prisoners are on the rise, with more than 143,000 confirmed cases to date. However, there is paucity of data addressing clinical outcomes and mortality in prisoners hospitalized with COVID-19. An observational study of all patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between March 10 and May 10, 2020 at two Henry Ford Health System hospitals in Michigan. Clinical outcomes were compared amongst hospitalized prisoners and non-prisoner patients. The primary outcomes were intubation rates, in-hospital mortality, and 30-day mortality. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox-regression models were used to investigate primary outcomes. Of the 706 hospitalized COVID-19 patients (mean age 66.7 ± 16.1 years, 57% males, and 44% black), 108 were prisoners and 598 were non-prisoners. Compared to non-prisoners, prisoners were more likely to present with fever, tachypnea, hypoxemia, and markedly elevated inflammatory markers. Prisoners were more commonly admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (26.9% vs. 18.7%), required vasopressors (24.1% vs. 9.9%), and intubated (25.0% vs. 15.2%). Prisoners had higher unadjusted inpatient mortality (29.6% vs. 20.1%) and 30-day mortality (34.3% vs. 24.6%). In the adjusted models, prisoner status was associated with higher in-hospital death (odds ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.33 to 4.05) and 30-day mortality (hazard ratio, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.33 to 3.00). In this cohort of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, prisoner status was associated with more severe clinical presentation, higher rates of ICU admissions, vasopressors requirement, intubation, in-hospital mortality, and 30-day mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adult , African Americans , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prisoners , Proportional Hazards Models , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survival Rate , United States , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Ventilators, Mechanical
12.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 29(1): 30, 2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069576

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), an emerging virus, has caused a global pandemic. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by SARS-CoV-2, has led to high hospitalization rates worldwide. Little is known about the occurrence of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and high mortality rates have been proposed. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence, characteristics and outcome of IHCA during the pandemic in comparison to an earlier period. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of data prospectively recorded during 3-month-periods 2019 and 2020 at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). All consecutive adult patients with IHCA were included. Clinical parameters, neurological outcomes and organ failure/support were assessed. RESULTS: During the study period hospital admissions declined from 18,262 (2019) to 13,994 (2020) (- 23%). The IHCA incidence increased from 4.6 (2019: 84 IHCA cases) to 6.6 (2020: 93 IHCA cases)/1000 hospital admissions. Median stay before IHCA was 4 (1-9) days. Demographic characteristics were comparable in both periods. IHCA location shifted towards the ICU (56% vs 37%, p < 0.01); shockable rhythm (VT/VF) (18% vs 29%, p = 0.05) and defibrillation were more frequent in the pandemic period (20% vs 35%, p < 0.05). Resuscitation times, rates of ROSC and post-CA characteristics were comparable in both periods. The severity of illness (SAPS II/SOFA), frequency of mechanical ventilation and frequency of vasopressor therapy after IHCA were higher during the 2020 period. Overall, 43 patients (12 with & 31 without COVID-19), presented with respiratory failure at the time of IHCA. The Horowitz index and resuscitation time were significantly lower in patients with COVID-19 (each p < 0.01). Favourable outcomes were observed in 42 and 10% of patients with and without COVID-19-related respiratory failure, respectively. CONCLUSION: Hospital admissions declined during the pandemic, but a higher incidence of IHCA was observed. IHCA in patients with COVID-19 was a common finding. Compared to patients with non-COVID-19-related respiratory failure, the outcome was improved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Arrest/epidemiology , Aged , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Drug Utilization/trends , Electric Countershock/trends , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Heart Arrest/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Patient Admission/trends , Respiration, Artificial/trends , Respiratory Insufficiency/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
13.
Pancreatology ; 21(1): 306-311, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Covid-19 is a rapidly spreading viral disease that can cause severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Besides the lungs it can also affect other organs like the heart or the liver. Whether there is a pancreatic manifestation as well is currently unclear. METHODS: and aims: We prospectively collected patient information of patients with Covid-19 associated ARDS in a registry (COvid Registry REChts der Isar intensive care Trial - CORRECT) and analyzed this patient cohort for signs of acute pancreatitis (e.g. lipase activity >3 times the upper limit). RESULTS: 12/38 (31.6%) patients with Covid-19 associated ARDS had a serum lipase activity >180 U/l. Median lipase activity was 422 U/l (186-1127). No patient showed typical findings of acute pancreatitis on imaging studies. On hemodynamic monitoring no patient had signs of intravascular fluid demand regarding MAP, GEDVI and therapy with vasopressors. To avoid worsening respiratory function no treatment with crystalloids was initiated. Lipasemia was not explained by gastroenteritis or renal insufficiency, occurred before as well as after viral clearance and 16.1 ± 6.0 days after the first symptoms. No patient developed severe acute pancreatitis during the follow up period of 35.8 ± 8.3 days. CONCLUSION: High lipasemia without typical signs of acute pancreatitis is a frequent finding in severe Covid-19 associated ARDS. Considering the markedly high levels of serum lipase activity, we think impaired microcirculation in severely ill patients can explain this finding rather than extra-pancreatic co-morbidities (UTN: DRKS00021612).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Lipase/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arterial Pressure , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Female , Hemodynamics , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pancreatitis/blood , Pancreatitis/diagnostic imaging , Pancreatitis/etiology , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Young Adult
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(1): e2035699, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052808

ABSTRACT

Importance: Although health care workers (HCWs) are at higher risk of acquiring coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it is unclear whether they are at risk of poorer outcomes. Objective: To evaluate the association between HCW status and outcomes among patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective, observational cohort study included consecutive adult patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 across 36 North American centers from April 15 to June 5, 2020. Data were collected from 1992 patients. Data were analyzed from September 10 to October 1, 2020. Exposures: Data on patient baseline characteristics, comorbidities, presenting symptoms, treatments, and outcomes were collected, including HCW status. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was a requirement for mechanical ventilation or death. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to yield adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% CIs for the association between HCW status and COVID-19-related outcomes in a 3:1 propensity score-matched cohort, adjusting for residual confounding after matching. Results: In total, 1790 patients were included, comprising 127 HCWs and 1663 non-HCWs. After 3:1 propensity score matching, 122 HCWs were matched to 366 non-HCWs. Women comprised 71 (58.2%) of matched HCWs and 214 (58.5%) of matched non-HCWs. Matched HCWs had a mean (SD) age of 52 (13) years, whereas matched non-HCWs had a mean (SD) age of 57 (17) years. In the matched cohort, the odds of the primary outcome, mechanical ventilation or death, were not significantly different for HCWs compared with non-HCWs (AOR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-1.04). The HCWs were less likely to require admission to an intensive care unit (AOR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.92) and were also less likely to require an admission of 7 days or longer (AOR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.34-0.83). There were no differences between matched HCWs and non-HCWs in terms of mechanical ventilation (AOR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.37-1.17), death (AOR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.18-1.27), or vasopressor requirements (AOR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.37-1.24). Conclusions and Relevance: In this propensity score-matched multicenter cohort study, HCW status was not associated with poorer outcomes among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and, in fact, was associated with a shorter length of hospitalization and decreased likelihood of intensive care unit admission. Further research is needed to elucidate the proportion of HCW infections acquired in the workplace and to assess whether HCW type is associated with outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Occupational Exposure , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , North America , Odds Ratio , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Workplace
15.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 11: 593179, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045524

ABSTRACT

Background: The majority of the critically ill patients may have critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI). The therapeutic effect of dexamethasone may be related to its ability to improve cortical function. Recent study showed that dexamethasone can reduce COVID-19 deaths by up to one third in critically ill patients. The aim of this article is to investigate whether SARS-CoV-2 can attack the adrenal cortex to aggravate the relative adrenal insufficiency. Methods: We summarized the clinical features of COVID-19 reported in currently available observational studies. ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression was examined in human adrenal glands by immunohistochemical staining. We retrospectively analyzed serum cortisol levels in critically ill patients with or without COVID-19. Results: High percentage of critically ill patients with SARS-COV-2 infection in the study were treated with vasopressors. ACE2 receptor and TMPRSS2 serine protease were colocalized in adrenocortical cells in zona fasciculata and zona reticularis. We collected plasma cortisol concentrations in nine critically ill patients with COVID-19. The cortisol levels of critically ill patients with COVID-19 were lower than those in non-COVID-19 critically ill group. Six of the nine COVID-19 critically ill patients had random plasma cortisol concentrations below 10 µg/dl, which met the criteria for the diagnosis of CIRCI. Conclusion: We demonstrate that ACE2 and TMPRSS2 are colocalized in adrenocortical cells, and that the cortisol levels are lower in critically ill patients with COVID-19 as compared to those of non-COVID-19 critically ill patients. Based on our findings, we recommend measuring plasma cortisol level to guide hormonal therapy.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Diseases/drug therapy , Adrenal Cortex Diseases/virology , Adrenal Cortex/virology , COVID-19/virology , Adrenal Cortex/enzymology , Adrenal Insufficiency/etiology , Adrenal Insufficiency/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Critical Illness , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Hydrocortisone/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Zona Fasciculata/metabolism , Zona Reticularis/metabolism
16.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1020900

ABSTRACT

Here we present the case of a 37-year-old previously healthy man who developed fever, headache and a unilateral, painful neck swelling while working offshore. He had no known contact with anyone with COVID-19; however, due to the ongoing pandemic, a nasopharyngeal swab was performed, which was positive for the virus. After transfer to hospital for assessment his condition rapidly deteriorated, requiring admission to intensive care for COVID-19 myocarditis. One week after discharge he re-presented with unilateral facial nerve palsy. Our case highlights an atypical presentation of COVID-19 and the multifaceted clinical course of this still poorly understood disease.


Subject(s)
Alkalosis, Respiratory/blood , Bell Palsy/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Myocarditis/physiopathology , Adult , Alkalosis, Respiratory/etiology , Blood Gas Analysis , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Echocardiography , Edema/etiology , Electrocardiography , Humans , Hypotension/etiology , Hypotension/physiopathology , Lymphadenitis/etiology , Lymphadenitis/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Myocarditis/blood , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Myocarditis/therapy , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Neck , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Peptide Fragments/blood , Procalcitonin/blood , Recovery of Function , SARS-CoV-2 , Troponin T/blood , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
17.
Am J Kidney Dis ; 77(4): 490-499.e1, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012701

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE & OBJECTIVE: Although coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been associated with acute kidney injury (AKI), it is unclear whether this association is independent of traditional risk factors such as hypotension, nephrotoxin exposure, and inflammation. We tested the independent association of COVID-19 with AKI. STUDY DESIGN: Multicenter, observational, cohort study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: Patients admitted to 1 of 6 hospitals within the Yale New Haven Health System between March 10, 2020, and August 31, 2020, with results for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing via polymerase chain reaction of a nasopharyngeal sample. EXPOSURE: Positive test for SARS-CoV-2. OUTCOME: AKI by KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) criteria. ANALYTICAL APPROACH: Evaluated the association of COVID-19 with AKI after controlling for time-invariant factors at admission (eg, demographic characteristics, comorbidities) and time-varying factors updated continuously during hospitalization (eg, vital signs, medications, laboratory results, respiratory failure) using time-updated Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Of the 22,122 patients hospitalized, 2,600 tested positive and 19,522 tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. Compared with patients who tested negative, patients with COVID-19 had more AKI (30.6% vs 18.2%; absolute risk difference, 12.5% [95% CI, 10.6%-14.3%]) and dialysis-requiring AKI (8.5% vs 3.6%) and lower rates of recovery from AKI (58% vs 69.8%). Compared with patients without COVID-19, patients with COVID-19 had higher inflammatory marker levels (C-reactive protein, ferritin) and greater use of vasopressors and diuretic agents. Compared with patients without COVID-19, patients with COVID-19 had a higher rate of AKI in univariable analysis (hazard ratio, 1.84 [95% CI, 1.73-1.95]). In a fully adjusted model controlling for demographic variables, comorbidities, vital signs, medications, and laboratory results, COVID-19 remained associated with a high rate of AKI (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.29-1.53]). LIMITATIONS: Possibility of residual confounding. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is associated with high rates of AKI not fully explained by adjustment for known risk factors. This suggests the presence of mechanisms of AKI not accounted for in this analysis, which may include a direct effect of COVID-19 on the kidney or other unmeasured mediators. Future studies should evaluate the possible unique pathways by which COVID-19 may cause AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Creatinine/blood , Diuretics/therapeutic use , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Renal Dialysis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/blood , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Respiration, Artificial , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
18.
Chest ; 159(2): 524-536, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996765

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has placed unprecedented burden on the delivery of intensive care services worldwide. RESEARCH QUESTION: What is the global point estimate of deaths and risk factors for patients who are admitted to ICUs with severe COVID-19? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: In this systematic review and meta-analysis Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library were searched up to August 1, 2020. Pooled prevalence of participant characteristics, clinical features, and outcome data was calculated with the use of random effects models. Subgroup analyses were based on geographic distribution, study type, quality assessment, sample size, end date, and patient disposition. Studies that reported in-hospital mortality rate of adult patients (age >18 years) with confirmed COVID-19 admitted to an ICU met study eligibility criteria. Critical evaluation was performed with the Newcastle Ottawa Scale for nonrandomized studies. RESULTS: Forty-five studies with 16,561 patients from 17 countries across four continents were included. Patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to ICUs had a mean age of 62.6 years (95% CI, 60.4-64.7). Common comorbidities included hypertension (49.5%; 95% CI, 44.9-54.0) and diabetes mellitus (26.6%; 95% CI, 22.7-30.8). More than three-quarters of cases experienced the development of ARDS (76.1%; 95% CI, 65.7-85.2). Invasive mechanical ventilation was required in 67.7% (95% CI, 59.1-75.7) of case, vasopressor support in 65.9% (95% CI, 52.4-78.4) of cases, renal replacement therapy in 16.9% (95% CI, 12.1-22.2) of cases, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in 6.4% (95% CI, 4.1-9.1) of cases. The duration of ICU and hospital admission was 10.8 days (95% CI, 9.3-18.4) and 19.1 days (95% CI, 16.3-21.9), respectively, with in-hospital mortality rate of 28.1% (95% CI, 23.4-33.0; I2 = 96%). No significant subgroup effect was observed. INTERPRETATION: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 who are admitted to the ICU require substantial organ support and prolonged ICU and hospital level care. The pooled estimate of global death from severe COVID-19 is <1 in 3.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Intensive Care Units , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Coinfection/physiopathology , Coinfection/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Heart Diseases/physiopathology , Heart Diseases/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Thrombosis/therapy
19.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 84(4): 946-952, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988149

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Limited information exists on mucocutaneous disease and its relation to course of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: To estimate prevalence of mucocutaneous findings, characterize morphologic patterns, and describe relationship to course in hospitalized adults with COVID-19. METHODS: Prospective cohort study at 2 tertiary hospitals (Northwell Health) between May 11, 2020 and June 15, 2020. RESULTS: Among 296 hospitalized adults with COVID-19, 35 (11.8%) had at least 1 disease-related eruption. Patterns included ulcer (13/35, 37.1%), purpura (9/35, 25.7%), necrosis (5/35, 14.3%), nonspecific erythema (4/35, 11.4%), morbilliform eruption (4/35, 11.4%), pernio-like lesions (4/35, 11.4%), and vesicles (1/35, 2.9%). Patterns also showed anatomic site specificity. A greater proportion of patients with mucocutaneous findings used mechanical ventilation (61% vs 30%), used vasopressors (77% vs 33%), initiated dialysis (31% vs 9%), had thrombosis (17% vs 11%), and had in-hospital mortality (34% vs 12%) compared with those without mucocutaneous findings. Patients with mucocutaneous disease were more likely to use mechanical ventilation (adjusted prevalence ratio, 1.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.37-2.86); P < .001). Differences for other outcomes were attenuated after covariate adjustment and did not reach statistical significance. LIMITATIONS: Skin biopsies were not performed. CONCLUSIONS: Distinct mucocutaneous patterns were identified in hospitalized adults with COVID-19. Mucocutaneous disease may be linked to more severe clinical course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Skin Diseases/virology , Skin/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Aged , Blister/virology , COVID-19/therapy , Chilblains/virology , Erythema/virology , Exanthema/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane , Necrosis/virology , Prospective Studies , Purpura/virology , Renal Dialysis , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Ulcer/virology , Thrombosis/virology , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
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