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1.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(12): 106118, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415616

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: RCVS (Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstrictive Syndrome) is a condition associated with vasoactive agents that alter endothelial function. There is growing evidence that endothelial inflammation contributes to cerebrovascular disease in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In our study, we describe the clinical features, risk factors, and outcomes of RCVS in a multicenter case series of patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Multicenter retrospective case series. We collected clinical characteristics, imaging, and outcomes of patients with RCVS and COVID-19 identified at each participating site. RESULTS: Ten patients were identified, 7 women, ages 21 - 62 years. Risk factors included use of vasoconstrictive agents in 7 and history of migraine in 2. Presenting symptoms included thunderclap headache in 5 patients with recurrent headaches in 4. Eight were hypertensive on arrival to the hospital. Symptoms of COVID-19 included fever in 2, respiratory symptoms in 8, and gastrointestinal symptoms in 1. One patient did not have systemic COVID-19 symptoms. MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in 3 cases, intraparenchymal hemorrhage in 2, acute ischemic stroke in 4, FLAIR hyperintensities in 2, and no abnormalities in 1 case. Neurovascular imaging showed focal segment irregularity and narrowing concerning for vasospasm of the left MCA in 4 cases and diffuse, multifocal narrowing of the intracranial vasculature in 6 cases. Outcomes varied, with 2 deaths, 2 remaining in the ICU, and 6 surviving to discharge with modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores of 0 (n=3), 2 (n=2), and 3 (n=1). CONCLUSIONS: Our series suggests that patients with COVID-19 may be at risk for RCVS, particularly in the setting of additional risk factors such as exposure to vasoactive agents. There was variability in the symptoms and severity of COVID-19, clinical characteristics, abnormalities on imaging, and mRS scores. However, a larger study is needed to validate a causal relationship between RCVS and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Arteries/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Circulation , Vasoconstriction , Vasospasm, Intracranial/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebral Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroimaging , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Syndrome , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States , Vasospasm, Intracranial/diagnostic imaging , Vasospasm, Intracranial/physiopathology , Vasospasm, Intracranial/therapy , Young Adult
2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(7): 105822, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179851

ABSTRACT

There have been limited cases linking SARS-CoV-2 infection with the development of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). We hereby report a rare case of RCVS in the setting of mild SARS-CoV-2 respiratory infection successfully treated with nimodipine and aspirin. SARS-CoV-2 attacks the ACE2-receptors, which are expressed in various body organs including the lungs, kidneys, and blood vessels. Vasoconstriction can result from down-regulation of the ACE2-receptors that can lead to sympathetic hypertonia of the cerebral blood vessel walls and/or over-activation of the renin-angiotensin axis.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Arteries/drug effects , Nimodipine/therapeutic use , Vasoconstriction/drug effects , Vasodilator Agents/therapeutic use , Vasospasm, Intracranial/drug therapy , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cerebral Arteries/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Arteries/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Syndrome , Treatment Outcome , Vasospasm, Intracranial/diagnostic imaging , Vasospasm, Intracranial/etiology , Vasospasm, Intracranial/physiopathology
3.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 25(3): 19, 2021 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100995

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides an updated discussion on the clinical presentation, diagnosis and radiographic features, mechanisms, associations and epidemiology, treatment, and prognosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Headache is common in PRES, though headache associated with PRES was not identified as a separate entity in the 2018 International Classification of Headache Disorders. Here, we review the relevant literature and suggest criteria for consideration of its inclusion. RECENT FINDINGS: COVID-19 has been identified as a potential risk factor for PRES, with a prevalence of 1-4% in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection undergoing neuroimaging, thus making a discussion of its identification and treatment particularly timely given the ongoing global pandemic at the time of this writing. PRES is a neuro-clinical syndrome with specific imaging findings. The clinical manifestations of PRES include headache, seizures, encephalopathy, visual disturbances, and focal neurologic deficits. Associations with PRES include renal failure, preeclampsia and eclampsia, autoimmune conditions, and immunosuppression. PRES is theorized to be a syndrome of disordered autoregulation and endothelial dysfunction resulting in preferential hyperperfusion of the posterior circulation. Treatment typically focuses on treating the underlying cause and removal of the offending agents.


Subject(s)
Endothelium/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/physiopathology , Seizures/physiopathology , Vision Disorders/physiopathology , Acute Chest Syndrome/epidemiology , Aminolevulinic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Anemia, Sickle Cell/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology , Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism , Brain Edema/diagnostic imaging , Brain Edema/physiopathology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Circulation/physiology , Cytokines/metabolism , Eclampsia/epidemiology , Female , Homeostasis/physiology , Humans , Hypertension/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/epidemiology , Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome/therapy , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Prognosis , Renal Insufficiency/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vasospasm, Intracranial/physiopathology
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